General Education Requirements for Professional Undergraduate Students (Regional Campus and Online)

APU’s General Education program comprises five major outcome areas, and all of these requirements must be met by approved courses:

  • Intellectual and Practical Skills
  • Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World
  • Biblical, Theological, and Philosophical Formation
  • Personal and Social Responsibility
  • Integrative and Applied Learning

All courses approved to satisfy General Education requirements are identified in the class schedule and are included on the list of approved General Education courses. This list is available through the Office of the Graduate and Professional Registrar. Additional courses may be approved in the future.

Even though students work closely with their Academic Records Specialist in determining their General Education requirements, the responsibility for fulfilling these requirements is solely that of the student.

All professional undergraduate students are required to access their Web-based Advisement Report (through the University Portal) for information regarding their major and General Education requirements and fulfillment of these requirements. Any questions about the application of transfer courses for course requirements should be directed to an Academic Records Specialist in the Office of the Graduate and Professional Registrar.

For additional information regarding the General Education program, please visit either General Education for APU Students, or the General Education website (tailored for faculty and staff).

Requirements

Courses listed in 2 categories cannot satisfy both requirements; students must choose which category the course will fulfill.

Intellectual and Practical Skills

Inquiry and Analysis, Critical and Creative Thinking, Written and Oral Communication, Personal Wellness, Quantitative Literacy, Information Literacy, and Teamwork and Problem Solving.

Writing 14-5
Writing 1A: Writing and Rhetoric for Professional Students
Writing 1B: Research and Writing for Professional Students
Writing for Prior Learning
Writing 2 13
Writing 2: Psychology Subdisciplines and Career Trajectories
Writing 2: Business Communication
Writing 2: Criminal Justice Research Methods
Writing 2: Theoretical Frameworks in Nursing
Writing 33-5
Writing 3: Business Ethics
Writing 3: Criminal Justice Research Design
Writing 3: Senior Capstone in Criminal Justice
Writing 3: Writing for Communication
Writing 3: Public Relations Strategies and Techniques
Writing 3: Senior Seminar in Psychology and Christian Integration
Writing 3: Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare
Writing 3: Evidence-Based Practice, Theory, and Clinical Pathways
Writing 3: Ethics and Issues in Health Care
Oral Communication3
Public Communication
Quantitative Literacy3
College Algebra
Introduction to Statistics
Statistics and Data Management for Nursing and Health Care
Total Units16-19

Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World

History3
World Civilizations to 1648
World Civilizations Since 1648
United States History to 1877
Literature3
Studies in Literature
Fine Arts3
Introduction to Art
Social Science3
Principles of Macroeconomics
Intro to Criminal Justice
General Psychology
Human Growth and Development
Natural Science with Lab4
Fundamentals of Biology
Introduction to Chemistry
Introduction to Astronomy
Total Units16

Biblical, Theological, and Philosophical Formation 2

PRBL 230Luke/Acts3
PRTH 200Theology and the Christian Life3
RNRS 396Professional Practice: Ethics, Issues, and Spirituality in Health Care 36
Choose from the following:
PRMI 108Christian Life, Faith, and Ministry3
PRBL 100Introduction to Biblical Literature: Exodus/Deuteronomy3
PRPH 100Introduction to Philosophy3
PRRS 200World Religions3
Total Units6-18

Personal and Social Responsibility

Civic Knowledge and Engagement3
Criminal Justice, Civic Engagement, and Social Responsibility
American Government
Political Psychology
Community Health Nursing
Intercultural Competence3
International Business
Multicultural Psychology
Urban/Rural Health Nursing

Integrative and Applied Learning

Strategic Management
Criminal Justice Internship
Senior Capstone in Criminal Justice
Field Experience
Research Experience I
Leadership in Health Care Settings
Clinical Practicum
Clinical Residency Nursing
Total Units2-3
AVERAGE TOTAL UNITS for GENERAL EDUCATION46-62

Program Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully complete this program shall be able to:
  1. Analyze the interactions of specific disciplines (e.g., science, mathematics, social science, humanities, history, language, or arts) with human culture.
  2. Apply scientific vocabulary, data, methods, and/or principles to explain natural or human phenomena.
  3. Critically analyze arguments (e.g., for assumptions, presumptions, alternative viewpoints, and logical consistency) to draw reasoned conclusions.
  4. Communicate in writing effectively (e.g., fluent use of thesis, argumentation, support, source materials, organization, language, diction, grammar, syntax, and formatting).
  5. Communicate orally effectively (e.g., strong organization, central message, language choice, supporting materials, and delivery techniques such as posture, gesture, eye contact, vocal expressiveness).
  6. Demonstrate information literacy competencies by accessing information and evaluating its reliability and value, as well as collaboratively producing and sharing information ethically.
  7. Demonstrate quantitative reasoning skills (e.g., by accurately representing, processing, and interpreting quantitative information).
  8. Apply disciplinary knowledge in order to evaluate principles and practices of civic engagement and make informed decisions.
  9. Engage with people and ideas from their own and other cultures (e.g., by seeking to understanding with curiosity, grace, humility, respect, and compassion).
  10. Make ethical decisions (e.g., by identifying, analyzing, and evaluating ethical issues in complex contexts and constructing an ethical framework).
  11. Interact with the breadth of Christian thought and practice by integrating at least two of the following: biblical texts, philosophical ideas, and theological traditions.
  12. Synthesize and apply learning from multiple contexts including classroom and non-classroom experiences.
  13. Utilize appropriate vocabulary, concepts, and knowledge systems of techniques to explain or demonstrate phenomena (e.g., in art, music, theater, or film).
  14. Interpret, analyze, or produce sound, visuals, or speech (e.g., in music, art, theater, film, creative writing, etc.) for an aesthetic outcome.
  15. Articulate best practices for improved personal wellness.

PRWR 110, Writing 1: The Art and Craft of Writing, 3 Units

Writing is a skill that can be practiced and improved. In this course, students learn about writing by approaching it from theoretical, historical, pedagogical, and practical perspectives. Students engage with writing processes, literacies, and genres by reading and writing about research and arguments dealing with all aspects of writing. Students also craft arguments of their own based on their research on the art and craft of writing. *Students must earn a C or higher in Writing 1 in order to register for Writing 2. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 1: The Art Craft of Writing. 

PRWR 112, Writing 1A: Writing and Rhetoric for Professional Students, 2 Units

Writing is a skill that can be practiced and improved. In this course, students learn about writing by approaching it from practical perspectives, engaging with writing processes, literacies, and genres by reading and writing about research and arguments dealing with all aspects of writing. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 1 (PRWR112+PRWR113), Writing 1 (PRWR112+PRWR115). 

PRWR 113, Writing 1B: Research and Writing for Professional Students, 2 Units

In this course, students build upon the foundation they established in PRWR 112, continuing to develop their writing processes and their writing portfolios by further revising, editing, and proofreading the major assignments from PRWR 112. They also improve their information literacy and research skills and write a comprehensive argument. Students must earn a C or better in PRWR 113 to enroll in Writing 2. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 1 (PRWR112+PRWR113). 

Prerequisite: PRWR 112 Writing 1A: Writing and Rhetoric for Professional Students

PRWR 115, Writing for Prior Learning, 3 Units

Writing is a lifelong skill that can be practiced and improved. In this course, each student writes a Prior Learning Essay, a key requirement for submitting a Prior Learning Assessment Portfolio (PLP). Writing the essay involves learning how to describe past experience, make reflective observations, articulate abstract principles, communicate personal competencies, perform self-guided research, and express one's professional goals. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 1 (PRWR112+PRWR115). 

Prerequisite: Writing 1 or PRWR 112

PRWR 260, Writing 2: Psychology Subdisciplines and Career Trajectories, 3 Units

This course provides a foundation for students to think, write and communicate as a psychological scientist. The specific style of writing is based on the American Psychological Association (APA) format that reflects the precepts within the discipline. The course focuses on the general writing process as well as the particular writing conventions in the social sciences to build critical skills in communication. As students learn to write thoughtfully and persuasively, students also engage in a comprehensive overview of the major subfields in the discipline of psychology and the variety of career trajectories that students may consider in behavioral settings. In the process of career exploration as it relates to central concerns, themes and professional trajectories, students will critically assess the writing style, questions, and arguments from multiple sub-disciplines. Students will also develop skill in formatting written work utilizing the style adopted by the APA in order to develop skills in effective writing, researching and identifying credible sources in the field. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: C- or better in PRWR 110 or PRWR 113

PRWR 261, Writing 2: Business Communication, 3 Units

In this course, students critically assess the writing styles, questions, and arguments found in the organizational environment in order to better understand what is considered persuasive and effective writing in business and management. Students respond to and evaluate writing, methodologies, ideas, and arguments, and practice rhetorical strategies being employed in their own field. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: C- or better in PRWR 110 or PRWR 113

PRWR 262, Writing 2: Criminal Justice Research Methods, 3 Units

This course is designed to introduce students to research writing in the social and behavioral sciences. Students will examine the basic methods of research design, measurement, and data collection in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Students will compare research writing to other genres of writing, taking into account audience and rhetorical situation (as learned in Writing 1). Additionally, this course will focus on teaching students the techniques used to define research problems, select and appropriately measure variables, state hypotheses, and select experimental methods, culminating in each student completing a research proposal (topic of their own choosing). Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: C- or better in PRWR 110 or PRWR 113, and PRCJ 110