General Education Program

APU’s General Education program comprises five major outcome areas, and all of these requirements must be met by approved courses:

  • Intellectual and Practical Skills
  • Biblical, Theological, and Philosophical Formation
  • Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World
  • Personal and Social Responsibility
  • Integrative and Applied Learning

Each student graduating from APU completes a maximum of 62 units of General Education courses. The number of units required is determined by whether a student enters as a freshman or as a transfer student, and by the year the student begins coursework at APU. Current students seeking to transfer coursework from other colleges and universities must verify with the Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center that those courses will be accepted for General Education credit. The policy for transferring credits to meet General Education requirements is available on the Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center website.

All courses approved to satisfy General Education requirements are identified in the class schedule and are included on the list of approved General Education courses; this list can be found at the Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center, the Academic Success Center, and through the Office of the Graduate and Professional Registrar. Additional courses may be approved in the future. Students are encouraged to take their General Education courses throughout all their years at APU.

Even though students work closely with a faculty advisor in determining their General Education requirements, the responsibility for fulfilling these requirements is solely that of the student. For more information, contact the Academic Success Center (traditional undergraduate students) or the Office of the Graduate and Professional Registrar (professional undergraduate students).

All students are required to access their Web-based Advisement Report (through home.apu.edu) for information regarding their major and General Education requirements and fulfillment of these requirements. Any questions about the application of transfer courses for course requirements should be directed to the Academic Success Center (traditional undergraduate students) or the Office of the Graduate and Professional Registrar (professional undergraduate students).

Note: Bachelor of Music majors are not required to take the Fitness for Life, Oral Communication, Foreign Language, Math, or Humanities: Fine Arts requirements. This statement does NOT apply to Bachelor of Arts music majors.

Courses listed in two categories cannot satisfy both requirements; students must choose which category the course will fulfill.
 
For additional information regarding the General Education program, visit either General Education for APU Students, or the General Education website (tailored for faculty and staff).

Information for Transfer Students

Students transferring in to Azusa Pacific University may have some of their General Education requirements met by courses taken at their previous institution(s). Additionally, the unit requirements for Biblical, Theological, and Philosophical Formation (BTPF) may be adjusted depending on the number of units the student transferred in to APU. See the General Education Information for Transfer Students section of the catalog for more information about these adjusted requirements.

The evaluation of a traditional undergraduate student’s transfer work is conducted by the Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center. All students are encouraged to work with the Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center and their academic advisor to determine their General Education requirements.

The evaluation of a professional undergraduate student’s transfer work is conducted by the Office of the Graduate and Professional Registrar. All students are encouraged to work with the Office of the Graduate and Professional Registrar and their academic advisor to determine their General Education requirements.

GE 100, First-Year Seminar, 3 Units

First-Year Seminar is designed to introduce students to academic success strategies and foster a sense of belonging at the university through engagement in the curricular and cocurricular life on campus. These small, seminar-style classes form around a broad, interdisciplinary topic or question and are taught by experienced faculty focused on students' critical thinking and communication skills, information literacy, spiritual formation, diversity competency, and wellness. The course helps students clarify their purpose, meaning, and direction, and promotes campus engagement and utilization of campus resources. Meets the General Education Requirement: First Year Seminar. 

Corequisite: MATH 90, MATH 99, or ALEKS 30-100 or satisfaction of GE Quantitative Literacy requirement.

GE 100H, First-Year Seminar - Honors, 3 Units

First-Year Seminar is designed to introduce students to academic success strategies and foster a sense of belonging at the university through engagement in the curricular and co-curricular life on campus. These small, seminar-style classes form around a broad, interdisciplinary topic or question and are taught by experienced faculty focused on students' critical thinking, communication skills, information literacy, spiritual formation, diversity competency, and wellness. The course helps students clarify their purpose, meaning, and direction, and promotes campus engagement and utilization of campus resources. Meets the General Education Requirement: First Year Seminar. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

GE 101, Academic Success Lab, 1 Unit

The Academic Success Lab is designed to support student admitted to the University in the Academic Success Launch Program. Through this course students will gain an increased awareness of on campus resources, create personal and academic goals and will be able to implement success strategies to maintain good academic standing at APU.

Prerequisite: Admission into the Academic Success Launch Program

PRWR 110, Writing 1: The Art and Craft of Writing, 3 Units

Writing is a skill that can be practiced and improved. In this course, students learn about writing by approaching it from theoretical, historical, pedagogical, and practical perspectives. Students engage with writing processes, literacies, and genres by reading and writing about research and arguments dealing with all aspects of writing. Students also craft arguments of their own based on their research on the art and craft of writing. *Students must earn a C or higher in Writing 1 in order to register for Writing 2. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 1: The Art Craft of Writing. 

PRWR 112, Writing 1A: Writing and Rhetoric for Professional Students, 2 Units

Writing is a skill that can be practiced and improved. In this course, students learn about writing by approaching it from practical perspectives, engaging with writing processes, literacies, and genres by reading and writing about research and arguments dealing with all aspects of writing. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 1 (PRWR112+PRWR113), Writing 1 (PRWR112+PRWR115). 

PRWR 113, Writing 1B: Research and Writing for Professional Students, 2 Units

In this course, students build upon the foundation they established in PRWR 112, continuing to develop their writing processes and their writing portfolios by further revising, editing, and proofreading the major assignments from PRWR 112. They also improve their information literacy and research skills and write a comprehensive argument. Students must earn a C or better in PRWR 113 to enroll in Writing 2. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 1 (PRWR112+PRWR113). 

Prerequisite: PRWR 112 Writing 1A: Writing and Rhetoric for Professional Students

PRWR 115, Writing for Prior Learning, 3 Units

Writing is a lifelong skill that can be practiced and improved. In this course, each student writes a Prior Learning Essay, a key requirement for submitting a Prior Learning Assessment Portfolio (PLP). Writing the essay involves learning how to describe past experience, make reflective observations, articulate abstract principles, communicate personal competencies, perform self-guided research, and express one's professional goals. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 1 (PRWR112+PRWR115). 

Prerequisite: Writing 1 or PRWR 112

PRWR 260, Writing 2: Psychology Subdisciplines and Career Trajectories, 3 Units

This course provides a foundation for students to think, write and communicate as a psychological scientist. The specific style of writing is based on the American Psychological Association (APA) format that reflects the precepts within the discipline. The course focuses on the general writing process as well as the particular writing conventions in the social sciences to build critical skills in communication. As students learn to write thoughtfully and persuasively, students also engage in a comprehensive overview of the major subfields in the discipline of psychology and the variety of career trajectories that students may consider in behavioral settings. In the process of career exploration as it relates to central concerns, themes and professional trajectories, students will critically assess the writing style, questions, and arguments from multiple sub-disciplines. Students will also develop skill in formatting written work utilizing the style adopted by the APA in order to develop skills in effective writing, researching and identifying credible sources in the field. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: C- or better in PRWR 110 or PRWR 113

PRWR 261, Writing 2: Business Communication, 3 Units

In this course, students critically assess the writing styles, questions, and arguments found in the organizational environment in order to better understand what is considered persuasive and effective writing in business and management. Students respond to and evaluate writing, methodologies, ideas, and arguments, and practice rhetorical strategies being employed in their own field. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: C- or better in PRWR 110 or PRWR 113

PRWR 262, Writing 2: Criminal Justice Research Methods, 3 Units

This course is designed to introduce students to research writing in the social and behavioral sciences. Students will examine the basic methods of research design, measurement, and data collection in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Students will compare research writing to other genres of writing, taking into account audience and rhetorical situation (as learned in Writing 1). Additionally, this course will focus on teaching students the techniques used to define research problems, select and appropriately measure variables, state hypotheses, and select experimental methods, culminating in each student completing a research proposal (topic of their own choosing). Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: C- or better in PRWR 110 or PRWR 113, and PRCJ 110

WRIT 110, Writing 1: The Art and Craft of Writing, 3 Units

Writing is a skill that can be practiced and improved. In this course, students learn about writing by approaching it from theoretical, historical, pedagogical, and practical perspectives. Students engage with writing processes, literacies, and genres by reading and writing about research and arguments dealing with all aspects of writing. Students also craft arguments of their own based on their research on the art and craft of writing. *Students must earn a C- or higher in Writing 1 in order to register for Writing 2. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 1: The Art Craft of Writing. 

Prerequisite: Completion of The Writing Class Placement Questionnaire.

WRIT 120, Writing 1 Lab, 1 Unit

For students who have chosen through advising and self-placement to receive the extra support that will encourage success in their Writing 1 course, the Writing 1 Lab provides weekly tutorials on Writing 1 assignments and brief assignments that provide enrichment in reading/writing/rhetoric/grammar in ways that support their work as writers in Writing 1. During weekly one hour sessions, students will work with a writing coach to further develop their writing processes, their handling of language conventions at the sentence and paragraph level, and deepen their reading and writing through peer editing sessions with a writing coach. Work will include tutoring on Writing 1 assignments, including rough drafts for Writing 1, and additional small assignments designed for the lab to link reading, writing, logic, and grammar. Students should expect to work two additional hours outside of the session. 1 unit course.

Prerequisite: Co-requisite: WRIT 110

WRIT 200, Writing 2: Writing for Christian Practice, 3 Units

In this course, students will critically assess the writing styles, questions, and arguments of one or more disciplines in order to better understand what is considered persuasive and effective writing in those fields. Students will respond to and evaluate writing, methodologies, ideas, and arguments and practice rhetorical strategies being employed in their own field. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, MIN 108; HON 101 or C- or Better in WRIT 110

WRIT 201, Writing 2: Philosophy of Math, Logic, and Language, 3 Units

Why is mathematics so effective in describing the physical universe? What happens when ordinary reasoning and languages are translated into more abstract mathematical and logical symbolism? Is anything lost in translation? This course introduces students to these and other questions on the nature of mathematics, logic, and language. Students evaluate the arguments, writing styles, rhetorical strategies, and types of evidence employed by the mathematicians, scientists, and philosophers addressing these questions. By critically thinking about formal logical and mathematical discourse, students become better writers in and about that discourse. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101, or C- or better in WRIT 110; PHIL 310 or MATH 280 or instructor's consent.

WRIT 202, Writing 2: Philosophical Writing in C. S. Lewis, 3 Units

C. S. Lewis was one of the most influential public Christian intellectuals of the 20th century. One of the reasons for this is that he wrote clearly and persuasively about the perennial questions of philosophy but for the common person. In this course, we will study and practice the art of writing well on philosophical matters for a broad audience. Students will critically assess the writing styles, questions, and arguments of philosophical writing for a general audience and will contrast what it takes to do such writing well with related forms of writing such as philosophical writing for a specialist audience and philosophical writing in fictional form. We will do so by analyzing, emulating, and critiquing the work of C. S. Lewis from the standpoint of philosophy. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or Better in WRIT 110

WRIT 203, Writing 2: Writing in Religion, Cinema, and Popular Culture, 3 Units

In this course, students critically assess the writing styles, questions, and arguments in the discipline of religious studies, with special focus on the study of religion and visual studies in order to better understand what is considered persuasive and effective writing in religious studies. Students respond to and evaluate writing, methodologies, ideas, arguments, and genres, and practice rhetorical strategies employed in the field. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101, or C- or better in WRIT 110.

WRIT 204, Writing 2: Writing for the Humanities in Spanish, 3 Units

Students in this course critically assess writing styles, questions, and arguments important to the humanities through a study of great works and life's enduring questions. In order to understand better what is considered persuasive and effective writing in the humanities, students respond to and evaluate writing, methodologies, ideas, and arguments, and practice rhetorical strategies employed in the liberal arts. The entire course, including all assignments, is in Spanish. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or better in WRIT 110, and SPAN 202

WRIT 210, Writing 2: Writing in the Humanities, 3 Units

In this course, students will critically assess writing styles, questions, and arguments important to the humanities through a study of great works and life's enduring questions. In order to understand better what is considered persuasive and effective writing in the humanities, students will respond to and evaluate writing, methodologies, ideas, and arguments, and practice rhetorical strategies being employed in the liberal arts. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or Better in WRIT 110

WRIT 220, Writing 2: Film Analysis and Criticism, 3 Units

This course is an introduction to film as a narrative and visual medium, emphasizing the terms, methods, and techniques of film analysis. Students view and discuss films in terms of formal elements plot structure, character development, themes, genres, and literary sources. Some attention is given to the history of cinema, film criticism and theory, as well as film production from development through distribution. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or Better in WRIT 110

WRIT 221, Writing 2: Writing for Visual Thinkers, 3 Units

In this course, students examine writing styles as expressed in the studio arts and design, whether as criticism, analysis, personal expression, persuasion, or artist and designer statements. Students will learn how to translate their visual world into words, and to evaluate visual ideas, both their own and others; as those gifted for visual expression are able. In order to understand how to write persuasively and effectively, students will examine theoretical approaches that are employed as conceptual frameworks in making art and design. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or Better in WRIT 110

WRIT 222, Writing 2: Writing about Music, 3 Units

In this course, students examine methods and tools of research and writing in music. They assess and practice various writing styles, as well as questions and arguments associated with (1) the historical fields of research (e.g., musicology, ethnomusicology, music education, music criticism, music analysis, program notes) and (2) music entrepreneurship (e.g., music business, production, marketing, artist management). Students also become familiar with online and hard copy music resources available in Marshburn Memorial Library. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or Better in WRIT 110

WRIT 240, Writing 2: Scientific Writing, 3 Units

In this course, students critically assess genres of scientific writing, including scientific journal articles, grant proposals, and writing for popular audiences, examining writing styles and forms of argument that are considered persuasive in the sciences. Students also evaluate writing samples, methodologies, ideas, and arguments, and practice writing in scientific genres. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or better in WRIT 110; and BIOL 152, BIOL 250, CHEM 152, PHYC 152, or PHYC 162.

WRIT 241, Writing 2: Physical Activity and Health Promotion, 3 Units

Students in this course have multiple opportunities to share knowledge through written assignments and brief verbal responses. The course activities challenge the student to consider the audience and platform for communication, develop a concise argument, persuade readers, and critically evaluate research articles. Students also enhance their skills in literature searches using the APU library databases, and gain proficiency in citing sources using APA formatting. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100; HON 101 or C- or better in WRIT 110; C- or higher in BIOL 230 or BIOL 250; and students must be applied exercise science, kinesiology, or physical education majors.

WRIT 242, Writing 2: Entrepreneurial Tech Start-ups, 3 Units

In this course, students will critically assess the writing styles, questions, and arguments of business, computer science and technology in order to better understand what is considered persuasive and effective writing in these fields. Students will respond to and evaluate writing, methodologies, ideas, and arguments and practice rhetorical strategies being employed in their own field while both analyzing and contributing to current trends in the field through the creation of relevant business-tech documents. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or Better in WRIT 110

WRIT 243, Writing 2: Mathematical Careers and Callings, 3 Units

In this course, students explore a variety of mathematical careers, assess writings from subdisciplines of mathematics, evaluate arguments regarding the purpose or value of mathematics, and explore the value of mathematical work in their individual contexts. Students critically assess the writing styles, questions, and arguments of mathematicians in a variety of careers in order to better understand what is considered persuasive and effective writing in those fields, and also practice rhetorical strategies. Course material includes Christian perspectives on the value of work and culture in general and the value and purpose of mathematical work in particular. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: HON 101 or WRIT 110 with C- or better

WRIT 260, Writing 2: Psychology Subdisciplines and Career Trajectories, 3 Units

This course provides a foundation for students to think, write, and communicate as psychological scientists. The specific style of writing is based on the American Psychological Association (APA) format, which reflects the precepts of the discipline. The course focuses on the general writing process as well as the particular writing conventions in the social sciences to build critical skills in communication. As students learn to write thoughtfully and persuasively, they also engage in a comprehensive overview of the major subfields in the discipline of psychology and the variety of career trajectories that students may consider in behavioral settings. In the process of career exploration as it relates to central concerns, themes, and professional trajectories, students critically assess the writing style, questions, and arguments from multiple subdisciplines. Students also develop skill in formatting written work utilizing APA style, in order to develop skills in effective writing, researching, and identifying credible sources in the field. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101, or C- or better in WRIT 110.

WRIT 261, Writing 2: Writing in Business, 3 Units

In this course, students critically assess the writing styles, questions, and arguments found in the organizational environment in order to better understand what is considered persuasive and effective writing in business and management. Students respond to and evaluate writing, methodologies, ideas, and arguments, and practice rhetorical strategies being employed in their own field. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or Better in WRIT 110

WRIT 262, Writing 2: Criminal Justice Research Methods, 3 Units

This course introduces students to research writing in the social and behavioral sciences, including the basic methods of research design, measurement, and data collection in criminology and criminal justice. Students compare research writing to other genres of writing, taking into account audience and rhetorical situation (as learned in Writing 1). Students also learn the techniques used to define research problems, select and appropriately measure variables, state hypotheses, and select experimental methods, culminating in each student completing a research proposal on a topic of their own choosing. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or better in WRIT 110; MATH 115 or MATH 130; and CJ 110

WRIT 263, Writing 2: Writing Ethnography in the Social Sciences, 3 Units

Ethnography is a research methodology used in business, education, health care, and ministry. In this course, students critically assess genres of ethnographic writing in the social sciences, including analytical journals, journal articles, and writing for popular audiences. Students examine writing styles and forms of argument that are considered persuasive in the social sciences. Students evaluate writing samples, methodologies, ideas, and arguments, and practice writing in social scientific genres. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: GE 100, HON 101 or C- or Better in WRIT 110