School of Business and Management

Wilden Hall on APU’s East Campus is home to the School of Business and Management and the LP and Timothy Leung School of Accounting.

Mission

The School of Business and Management is a Christ-centered community of scholars and professionals pursuing academic excellence to advance the work of God in the world, developing students of character and competence as difference makers in business and society.

Tenets

The School of Business and Management is committed to the following core principles:

Academic Excellence

Learning and producing scholarship in a community of excellence by:

  1. Viewing students as the first priority.
  2. Maintaining a dynamic teaching environment where relevant business and management theories and practical tools are imparted.
  3. Engaging in scholarship that advances the thinking in related fields, informs teaching, involves students, and serves communities in practical ways.
  4. Investing in campus infrastructure, technology, and alliances to enhance capabilities to learn and produce scholarship.
  5. Sustaining a learning environment that fosters critical analysis and creative thinking.

Students of Character

Learning and producing scholarship in a community of faith by:

  1. Modeling and infusing a Christian perspective of truth and life throughout SBM programs.
  2. Enlivening the mind and transforming the heart by developing important links between faith, learning, and application.
  3. Facilitating nurturing, caring, and mentoring relationships among faculty, staff, students, and alumni.
  4. Practicing God-honoring diversity.

Advance the Work of God in the World

Learning and producing scholarship to impact the world by:

  1. Helping students identify their strengths and providing mentoring to ensure those strengths are developed and utilized to benefit business and society.
  2. Using experiential, real-world, and service learning to create value for students and the community.
  3. Developing programs, alumni, and students that have an impact around the world.
  4. Preparing students academically, professionally, and spiritually to engage their field and community in God-honoring ways.
  5. Actively advancing the work of God through research, teaching, and community service.
  6. Teaching the ethical conduct of business throughout all SBM programs.

LP and Timothy Leung School of Accounting

Housed within Azusa Pacific’s School of Business and Management, the LP and Timothy Leung School of Accounting focuses on developing graduates with the Christian character and competence demanded by the public accounting profession. The school offers a B.S. in Accounting, an accounting minor, and a Master of Professional Accountancy (MAcc).

Vision Statement

To be a premier Christian accounting school, recognized as a thought leader on accounting character and competence to reflect the life of Christ and shine the light of Truth.

Accreditation

Undergraduate Business Programs

The School of Business and Management (SBM) provides professional career preparation in accordance with the university’s Christian heritage and mission. To this end, the school has built a reputation for pragmatic and ethically based education. The curriculum blends with the liberal studies foundation provided by other schools or departments of the university.

The school encompasses diverse programs in business, management, and economics, and within these programs are multiple options for majors and minors. The school offers a Bachelor of Arts in Business Management and a Bachelor of Science in Business with six majors: accounting, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, and marketing. The B.A. degree requires students to complete the common professional component (the business core) and then select elective courses deemed most appropriate for their career objectives. The B.S. degrees require students to complete the business core and courses in an area of specialization. The school also offers a Bachelor of Arts in Economics, which requires the completion of the economics core and additional economics electives. 

At the professional level, the school offers a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree completion program and a business administration minor, both of which feature learning that is immediately applicable in the workplace. The relevant coursework addresses current issues in business and encourages the integration of real-world work experiences and hands-on projects. Combine these experiences with internships or international study opportunities to further expand your portfolio and network. Optional concentrations provide students the opportunities to dive deeper into the specific business areas of supply chain management, human resource development, and leading teams and people. 

Curriculum content in the undergraduate business program is aligned with graduate school requirements for those who wish to pursue a Master of Business Administration (MBA)Master of Business Management (MBM), or Master of Professional Accountancy (MAcc)

Graduate Business Programs

The School of Business and Management offers a Master of Business Administration (MBA)Master of Business Management (MBM), and Master of Professional Accountancy (MAcc). These comprehensive and intensive graduate accounting, business, and management programs develop exceptional business management professionals with outstanding moral character, strong analytical and innovative decision-making skills, and a worldview that understands and appreciates the global diversity in cultures, markets, and economies. SBM graduate programs provide advanced professional education and academic studies leading to successful careers in business firms, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations.

The graduate business and management programs are an integral part of the university’s vision of scholastic leadership through excellence in academic programs, a community service focus, and deep commitment to faith that reaches across the globe. The programs further reflect the commitment of the School of Business and Management to continuously advance the university’s core principles of transformational scholarship, faith integration, God-honoring diversity, and intentional internationalization.

ACCT 120, Principles of Accounting I, 4 Units

This course introduces the financial accounting model and application of fundamental accounting principles. The corporate form of business serves as the primary model to demonstrate accounting principles for cash, accounts receivable, inventories, operational assets, liabilities and stockholders' equity. Students complete a computer simulation which introduces computer application in accounting.

ACCT 121, Principles of Accounting II, 3 Units

This course introduces basic managerial accounting concepts and emphasizes the use of accounting data in decision making. Topics covered include cost accumulation models, cost behavior, break-even analysis, variable costing, budgeting, differential analysis, product pricing, capital expenditure analysis, and financial statement analysis.

Prerequisite: ACCT 120

ACCT 122, Accounting Perspectives, 1 Unit

This course introduces students pursuing an accounting degree to a broad overview of the various career paths available to successful accounting graduates.

ACCT 320, Intermediate Accounting I, 3 Units

This course offers an intensive study of the accounting theory and principles underlying financial accounting. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical and conceptual framework of the financial reporting process including the role and authority of official accounting pronouncements and the responsibilities of professional accountants. This course begins with a review of the accounting model and covers accounting theory as it relates to revenue recognition, current assets including cash, accounts receivable, inventories, and current liabilities.

Prerequisite: ACCT 121

ACCT 321, Intermediate Accounting II, 3 Units

This course continues the study begun in ACCT 320, covering operational assets, intangible assets, investments, long-term liabilities, leases, income taxes, corporate capital transactions, and statement of cash flows. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical and conceptual framework of the financial reporting process including the role and authority of official accounting pronouncements and the responsibilities of professional accountants.

Prerequisite: ACCT 320

ACCT 325, Cost Accounting, 3 Units

This course explores managerial accounting concepts used in planning and controlling operations, determining cost of production, inventory control and evaluation, budgeting, and long-range planning. Emphasis is placed on cost determination, cost accumulation, cost-volume-profit relationships, standard costs, variances analysis and reporting, and the relationship between controlling costs and controlling operations.

Prerequisite: ACCT 321

ACCT 331, Federal Taxes I, 3 Units

This course offers an intensive study of the theory and principles of federal income tax law as it applies to individuals. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical framework and philosophy of the federal tax system as well as practical application and planning. This course covers basic concepts in the determination of income, classes of deductions, allowable credits, and property transactions. The importance of appropriate tax planning is stressed.

Prerequisite: ACCT 121

ACCT 332, Federal Taxes II, 3 Units

This course offers an intensive study of the theory and principles of federal income tax law as it applies to business entities - corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical framework as well as practical application and planning. This course covers basic concepts of taxation in corporate formation and operation, partnership and S corporation formation and operation, and fundamentals of estate, gift, and trust taxation. The course also covers the tax audit process and professional tax preparer responsibilities.

Prerequisite: ACCT 331

ACCT 336, Advanced Accounting, 3 Units

This course provides an in-depth study of accounting theory and principles. Topics include business combinations, consolidations, insolvency, foreign currency transactions, segment reporting, partnerships, fund accounting, and accounting for state and local governmental units and other non-business organizations.

Prerequisite: ACCT 321

ACCT 425, Writing 3: Accounting Ethics, 3 Units

Students in this course are introduced to issues of accounting ethics that professionals encounter in practice, moral reasoning to resolve ethical dilemmas, and accountants' professional codes of conduct. Topics include major philosophical schools of thought, biblical perspectives on accountability, ethical reasoning strategies, earnings management, fraud, and corporate governance. Credit is not given for both ACCT 425 and ACCT 525. ACCT 425 does not satisfy the requirements of the Master of Professional Accounting (MAcc) program. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2 and ACCT 321.

ACCT 426, Auditing Principles I, 3 Units

This course is an overview of auditing concepts, with special attention to auditing standards, professional ethics, the legal ability inherent in the attest function, the study and evaluation of internal control, the nature of evidence, statistical sampling, and the impact of electronic data processing. The basic approach to planning an audit is also addressed, as are the audit objectives and procedures applied to the elements in a financial statement.

ACCT 427, Auditing Principles II, 3 Units

This course takes the concepts and procedures learned in ACCT 426 and applies them in a comprehensive audit case study. Students prepare audit work papers that demonstrate application of audit theory and objectives for various classes of financial statement accounts. Students are exposed to the planning, control, and review procedures used by many public accounting firms. The use of computerized audit software is covered.

Prerequisite: ACCT 426

ACCT 502, Financial Accounting, 3 Units

This course introduces the financial accounting model and application of fundamental accounting principles. The corporate form of business serves as the primary model to demonstrate accounting principles for cash, accounts receivable, inventories, operational assets, liabilities and stockholders' equity. Students will interpret company performance by analyzing accounting statements and complete a computer simulation which demonstrates computer applications in accounting.

ACCT 505, Accounting Internship, 3 Units

This course provides a practical application of principles and theory in an actual business setting through an accounting internship with a CPA firm. Students without prior public accounting internships or work experience are required to take the course.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

ACCT 510, Accounting and Tax Research Methods, 3 Units

In preparation for professional practice, students explore accounting research methods and tax issues utilizing professional online research databases to properly identify and focus research questions, interpret data, develop opinions, and effectively communicate the results.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

ACCT 512, Management Accounting, 3 Units

Students investigate the various ways management uses accounting information to make critical strategic and operational decisions such as product pricing, line extensions, and activity-based costing and to evaluate operating performance including EVA and balanced scorecard. Students discuss methods of distilling key financial and managerial accounting information, as well as motivating and aligning management to act in the firm's best interests. Case based

ACCT 515, Accounting Information Systems, 3 Units

This course emphasizes the application of accounting information systems. Students gain experience in auditing data within the computer environment and learn the controls necessary to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the accounting system.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

ACCT 520, Global Financial Accounting Standards, 3 Units

This course compares global accounting standards of the International Financial Reporting Standards to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles standards in the United States. Topics include statements of operations, financial position, stockholders' equity, and cash flow, as well as research and development, inventories, pensions, stock options, intangibles, leases, and taxes. Students learn through in-depth analysis of contemporary financial reporting requirements promulgated by the national and international accounting standards boards.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

ACCT 525, Accounting Ethics, 3 Units

Students explore accounting ethics encountered in practice such as, moral reasoning to resolve ethical dilemmas and accountants' professional codes of conduct. Topics include major philosophical schools of thought, biblical perspective on accountability, ethical reasoning strategies, earnings management, fraud, and corporate governance.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

ACCT 530, Advanced Business Law, 3 Units

Focusing on advanced legal issues encountered in financial and commercial business transactions, this course offers an in-depth study of business law, mergers and acquisitions, sales, commercial paper, secured transactions, documents of title, bankruptcy, securities regulations, and the legal liability of accountants.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

ACCT 535, Advanced Managerial Accounting, 3 Units

Students investigate the various ways management uses accounting information to make critical strategic and operational decisions such as product pricing, line extensions, and activity-based costing, and to evaluate operating performance including EVA and balanced scorecard. Students discuss methods of distilling key financial and managerial accounting information, as well as motivating and aligning management to act in the firm's best interests. Case based.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

ACCT 540, Forensic Accounting and Fraud Investigation, 3 Units

Discussion focuses on the principles and methodology of forensic accounting, including fraud detection and prevention. Students examine consumer, management, employee, and financial statement fraud. Prevention through internal controls and evidence gathering techniques are also addressed.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

ACCT 545, Advanced Auditing, 3 Units

This course covers advanced auditing topics and helps students develop an understanding of auditing standards and practice through in-depth analysis of contemporary auditing theory as promulgated by the accounting profession. The course emphasizes pronouncements by the Auditing Standards Board and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

ACCT 550, Accounting for Governmental and Nonprofit Entities, 3 Units

Students review theory and principles applicable to nonprofit accounting and accounting for government units. Topics include financial performance measurement and the accounting requirements and reporting practices of specific types of nonprofit organizations. Government topics include objectives and principles of government accounting and budgetary, revenue, and expenditure accounting.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

ACCT 590, Integrative Accounting Review, 3 Units

In this course, students integrate the learning experience by completing modules related directly to CPA exam preparation.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Accountancy Program

BUSI 100, Personal Finance, 3 Units

An overview of personal financial planning offers students power over financial resources, freedom to give generously, and insight for better citizenship. The course emphasizes concepts such as goal setting, budgeting, debt management, investing, major purchases, insurance, and retirement/estate planning.

BUSI 110, Business and Entrepreneurship, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the role of business in society and the impact of the social environment on the firm. It acquaints students with the basic functional areas of business, including management, human resources, marketing, finance, and production.

BUSI 240, Introduction to Information Systems, 3 Units

This class offers a study of the fundamentals of information systems methods and equipment, computer characteristics and concepts, and elements of programming. Business applications of computers are discussed and demonstrated. A working knowledge of personal computer productivity tools such as Web browsers, Microsoft operating systems, and Microsoft Office is provided.

BUSI 244, Spreadsheets and Information Technology, 3 Units

This course introduces information technology and its application to business, emphasizing the use of spreadsheets to solve common business problems. Students learn how the components of information technology (hardware, software, databases, networks, etc.) work together to build intraorganizational information systems such as those for supply chain management, enterprise resource planning, and customer relationship management.

Prerequisite: BUSI 240

BUSI 296, Business Law, 3 Units

The course introduces the laws affecting business transactions. Included is an overview of the legal system as it relates to business and in-depth study of contracts, sales and commercial transactions, and secured transactions.

BUSI 311, Quantitative Analysis for Management, 3 Units

This course equips students with analytical and mathematical models for business decision making. Included are statistical analysis, project management, simulation, and linear programming.

Prerequisite: B- or better in MATH 110

BUSI 313, Negotiation Strategies and Skills, 3 Units

Students in this course learn the basics of negotiation, then research and explore additional techniques that help them establish alternative criteria to expand and build upon their bargaining style. Each student is assessed on negotiating style, role playing, principled negotiation, and information gathering. Emphasis is on topics related to negotiations in a business context.

BUSI 350, Business Internship, 1-3 Units

This course gives students the opportunity for practical application of principle and theory in an actual business setting through an internship. Students learn to set objectives and measure performance against those objectives in the business setting through a structured reporting process with the instructor.

Prerequisite: Completion of 60 units and instructor's permission.

BUSI 370, International Business, 3 Units

This course presents a survey of issues in international business, with a focus on managing in an international environment, understanding the global monetary system, and developing an international perspective on business operations including production, marketing, finance, and human resources. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: MGMT 210 and MKTG 260

BUSI 405, Business Report Writing, 3 Units

Students practice writing clear, well-organized, effective formal and informal reports. Evaluation and preparation of business reports, utilizing business research methods and communication techniques are emphasized. Management of data and the use of graphics also are included.

BUSI 430, Money and Banking, 3 Units

This course includes a study of monetary theories and banking principles, with special reference to contemporary developments in money and banking in the United States, the Federal Reserve System, and financial investment.

Prerequisite: ACCT 121, ECON 250, and ECON 251

BUSI 495, Writing 3: Business Ethics, 3 Units

This course focuses on the integration of Christian faith, ethical issues, and professional concerns that confront business professionals in the workplace. Students explore biblical and moral principles for ethical analysis and reflection and utilize the case method to research and write managerial responses to current ethical dilemmas in the workplace. This course fulfills the General Education Writing 3 requirement and is recommended for all business majors. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2

BUSI 496, Senior Seminar: Business Ethics, 3 Units

This course focuses on the integration of Christian faith, ethical issues and professional concerns, which confront business professionals in the workplace with particular concern for leadership and transitions. The course will explore biblical and moral principles as related to real life case studies. In addition, the course offers the student the opportunity to complete in-depth study in a business related area to further prepare them as effective participants and leaders in the workplace. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and upper-division writing intensive course, majority of God's Word and the Christian Response

BUSI 496H, Senior Seminar: Business Ethics - Honors, 3 Units

This course focuses on the integration of Christian faith, ethical issues and professional concerns, which confront business professionals in the workplace with particular concern for leadership and transitions. The course will explore biblical and moral principles as related to real life case studies. In addition, the course offers the student the opportunity to complete in-depth study in a business related area to further prepare them as effective participants and leaders in the workplace. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing and upper-division writing intensive course. Must also be a student admitted to the Honors College and be considered a member in "active" status.

BUSI 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

BUSI 497H, Readings - Honors, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

BUSI 511, Quantitative Analysis and Research, 3 Units

Decision making in the business enterprise is becoming increasingly complex. This course introduces students to the research process including literature review, hypothesis development, research design, data collection, sampling, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, qualitative data analysis, and report writing. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to design, execute and present a quantitative business research project from start to finish. Laptop computers are required in each class, and students should have already mastered basic statistical analysis prior to taking this class.

BUSI 514, Operations Management, 3 Units

Different business strategies require different processes, and each strategy utilizes unique capabilities to gain competitive advantage. Students in this case-based course use a process view of operations to analyze key dimensions such as capacity planning, cycle time management, role of technology, logistics and supply chain management, and quality management. Students also connect to recent developments such as lean or world-class manufacturing, just-in-time operations, time-based competition, and business reengineering.

BUSI 516, Organizational Behavior, 3 Units

This course provides students with the social science tools needed to solve organizational problems and influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations. It prepares managers to organize and motivate the human capital of the firm, manage social networks and alliances, and execute strategic change through knowledge of competitive decision making, reward system design, team building, strategic negotiation, political dynamics, corporate culture, and strategic organizational design. Case based.

BUSI 519, Research Design and Program Evaluation for Nonprofits, 3 Units

This practical methods course focuses on the available literature and research studies in the public and nonprofit sectors. In addition, it prepares students in such areas as setting research objectives, respondent selection/sample size, questionnaire development, evaluation, and the merits of conducting research in-house versus using an outside consultant or research firm. The course also covers qualitative research techniques, including depth interviews and focus groups. It includes a unit on copy testing (of brochures, direct mail, print, and video) to evaluate message communication before or after production.

BUSI 522, Private Enterprise and Public Policy, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to political economy, the role of government in a mixed economy, business-government relations, the public policy process, regulation of business, corporate political activity, and the creation of businesses to capitalize on opportunities driven by legislative or regulatory action. Case based.

BUSI 523, Manufacturing Operations, 3 Units

This course provides an understanding of the concepts, methodologies, and applications of production operations management. Focus is on analysis and study of production methods and procedures available to line and staff management in various-sized U.S. and global business operations. Significant attention is given to decision-making processes appropriate for manufacturing or service organizations, including tactical and operational considerations. Coursework stresses the need and reasons for input, involvement, and interaction of operations personnel with all other disciplines and areas of a business organization.

BUSI 528, Consulting for Organizations, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of the consulting and advisory process as it relates to external and internal consultation in industry. The course focuses on various aspects of the consulting process life cycle such as gaining and retaining clients, developing proposals and engagement letters, defining client needs and diagnosing problems, utilizing effective data collection and analysis methodologies, documenting information gathered, developing solutions, presenting recommendations, and managing project requirements. Several types of consulting services and related issues are addressed. Students gain experience in basic consulting skills by completing a real-life consulting project and presenting their findings orally and in writing.

Prerequisite: MGMT 521

BUSI 530, Capstone Project: Entrepreneurial Emphasis, 3 Units

The project integrates the learning experience with a plan for development and implementation of a new, untried venture. The completed project describes the product or service offered, including necessary financing, proposed staffing, market size and niche, and the timetable associated with each element. Oral defense before a faculty panel completes the experience.

BUSI 532, Ethical Issues in Nonprofit Management, 3 Units

Following introductory class sessions on moral philosophy and democratic capitalism, students explore a variety of issues/decisions confronting leaders/managers. Case study situations include such areas as stewardship, truth in advertising, social (behavior change) marketing, marketing research (privacy and confidentiality); corporate responsibility, board/staff relations (accountability), individual responsibility (limits of welfare), and global issues (government corruption, labor practices, etc.).

BUSI 542, Managing Cultural Differences, 3 Units

Students learn how to identify, analyze, and plan for those elements within the cultural, economic, and political environments of international business that require specialized understanding and strategy for successful management or organized enterprise.

BUSI 543, International Trade and Finance, 3 Units

Students learn about the financial-monetary-economic environment of international business. Topics include the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets and risk, trade finance, direct foreign investment, capital budgeting in the multinational firm, and the international money and capital markets. Emphasis is placed on decision making with regard to international investment and financing.

BUSI 548, International Business, 3 Units

This course covers the various strategies businesses use in worldwide operations. Students explore the development of business strategies, the motivations for firms to expand operations globally, organizational challenges, and managerial implications. Students also examine political, economic, and social factors that shape the international business environment. The course focuses on competitive responses to these external pressures and identifies strategic models or approaches. Organizational capabilities, structures, and systems are examined to deliver optimal results. The necessary processes to acquire cross-border knowledge for creating joint ventures and alliances are examined. Finally, the future role of Multi-National Enterprises (MNE's) for the global economy is explored. Case and simulation based.

BUSI 550, Capstone Project: International Emphasis, 3 Units

Students submit a business plan that summarizes the major areas within international business from organization to quantitative methods. Methodology and underlying theories are presented through an exploration of the present international business environment. Oral defense of the completed project before a faculty panel is required.

BUSI 551, Situation Analysis and Diagnosis, 3 Units

This course introduces the purpose, methods, and skills of situation analysis and diagnosis in carefully selected case studies. Students benefit from a focused approach to interpreting, understanding, and developing skills to discover appropriate conclusions in differing business environments and situations.

BUSI 552, Comparative Management, 3 Units

The course enables the international business student to understand how management objectives, goals, practices, and business-government interaction are related to the cultural settings in which they take place. The course includes: analysis of international similarities and differences in managerial functions, structure and process, etc., in light of environmental factors; identification of the impact and results of different management practices; and an inquiry into the "universals" of management.

Corequisite: BUSI 551

BUSI 555, Integrated Decision Making in Nonprofits, 3 Units

This course, taken in the student's final semester, develops the students' ability to understand the decision-making process and execute the steps involved in identifying, evaluating, and implementing an effective business strategy for a nonprofit organization. The purpose is achieved as students identify their organization's mission, primary customers, and specific goals by integrating the functional knowledge acquired in previous nonprofit courses (i.e., management, marketing, finance, research, ethics, etc.) and by developing a comprehensive strategic plan for a new organization, an existing organization, or from the perspective of an organization that wants to review its current offerings. As such, the course also examines factors unique to a nonprofit (e.g., involvement of the board and lay members, government funders, communication with various customer groups, and assuring congruence between organizational mission and the strategic plan).

BUSI 561, Fund Development: Planning, Implementing, and Evaluation, 3 Units

This course examines the principles and methods of fundraising that respond to one's understanding of what donors, funders, and volunteers value, that is, what inspires their giving and how to develop and nurture these relationships. It uses case studies to demonstrate successful/unsuccessful promotional techniques, including advertising campaigns, direct mail, and special events. It also explores such areas as if/when to use consultants and special forms of planned giving. Finally, the course includes units on philanthropy/corporate giving and foundations, as well as a unit on grant writing.

BUSI 562, Effective Nonprofit Leadership and Management, 3 Units

This course addresses the questions: What are the characteristics of effective leadership and management? How can one organize for success and evaluate/strengthen the work already done? It explores the fundamental challenges to effective leadership including defining and articulating the organization's mission, identifying and understanding the multiple "customers" served, and identifying and prioritizing the critical managerial tasks that must be successfully executed. As such, it examines the roles of the executive director, the board, staff, and volunteers. Finally, this course introduces students to the Drucker Formulation Self-Assessment Tool for Nonprofit Organizations based on management expert Peter F. Drucker's principles of management.

BUSI 563, Public Accounting: Legal and Financial Issues in Nonprofit Management, 3 Units

This course introduces the legal and financial issues relevant to managing a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization. Issues addressed include organizing the entity, qualifying for and maintaining nonprofit status, fundraising, and nonprofit enterprise. Financial areas covered include the principles of fiscal responsibility for nonprofits as well as cost accounting, budgeting, the presentation of financial statements, proposed development, and in-kind resources.

BUSI 564, Strategic Marketing for Nonprofits, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to the field of strategic marketing of nonprofit organizations (e.g., educational institutions, churches, the public and social sectors, health services, and the arts). The course texts, outside readings, videos, case studies, and class exercises focus on understanding three areas of effectiveness: 1) what makes an organization effective or not; 2) how individuals can improve their own effectiveness as managers, staff, or volunteers; and 3) how promotional strategies can be used to enhance the organization's effectiveness.

BUSI 569, Nonprofits in America: History, Philosophy, and Tradition, 3 Units

This introductory course traces the history, philosophy, and societal role of nonprofits in the United States and how the independent sector today compares organizationally to business and government. As such, it examines the roles of government (at the state and federal levels), religion and churches (including constitutional issues), business (corporate philanthropy), and the rights/responsibilities of individuals (e.g., natural law and contemporary public policy).

BUSI 576, Business Internship, 3 Units

This course gives students an opportunity to apply educational principles, theory, and disciplinary skills to a position with an organization, either for-profit or not-for-profit. Students are responsible for obtaining employment, and must submit the application for appropriate internship approvals. They also learn to set objectives and measure performance against those objectives in a business or related setting through a structured reporting process with the instructor. Projects and assignments are due throughout the term.

Prerequisite: Appropriate employment for internship, completion of 30 units of coursework, and instructor's permission.

BUSI 577, Global Field Study, 3 Units

This course provides the framework for graduate students to register for and complete a global field study in various countries around the world. During the course, students conduct corporate visits to business firms locally and around the globe to discuss how they apply and practice the business management principles, concepts and theories covered in the graduate curriculum.

BUSI 581, Strategic Leadership, 2 Units

Students learn to set an organization's strategic direction, align corporate organizational structure to implement strategy, and lead individuals. Students explore the power and strategic importance of their own formation and identity as a leader in creating value, mobilizing resources around opportunities, and influencing others through their corporate role. Class discussions serve as a framework for exploring high-performance impact, corporate culture, reputation, leading strategic change, and leadership theories and styles, with particular attention to servant leadership as an extension of a Christian worldview. Students further explore informal and formal authority and the strategic connection between personal leadership and organizational effectiveness.

BUSI 583, Integrated Decision Making, 3 Units

Students seek to develop the capability to appreciate and carry out the decision-making processes involved in identifying, evaluating, selecting, and implementing strategy in a company. This purpose is achieved by requiring the student to set goals, analyze business problems, develop a framework for making decisions to reach these goals, integrate the functional knowledge acquired in previous courses, and experience, through computer simulation business cases, the processes and functions performed by executive officers in meeting goals, and coping with an uncertain business environment.

BUSI 590, Capstone Project, 3 Units

Intended for students with extensive workplace experience, this comprehensive capstone provides an opportunity for students to integrate their learning through the formulation of a corporate report providing strategic direction to a national, international, or global business. The completed strategic plan describes the general economic process applied to a business selected by the student: seasonal sales cycle, inflation/recession tendencies, and product life cycle. Emphasis is placed on the development of strategies, economic analysis, and flexibility of strategic alternatives within the plan.

BUSI 591, Marketing Strategy for Competitive Advantage, 3 Units

This course concentrates on the strategic issues encountered in marketing, in terms of total corporate and business strategy. Emphasis centers on matching internal strengths with outside opportunities, giving attention to weaknesses of the firm and threats from the environment. The goal is attainment of a sustainable competitive advantage.

Prerequisite: MGMT 578

BUSI 592, Financial Strategy for Competitive Advantage, 3 Units

This seminar stresses the enterprise-wide view of the strategic management of financial resources. Lectures and case studies present the tools and perspective necessary to gain a competitive advantage through financial management.

Prerequisite: FIN 513 and MGMT 578

BUSI 593, Manufacturing Strategy for Competitive Advantage, 3 Units

This course concentrates on the strategic issues encountered in the manufacturing processes. Manufacturing is recognized as an important strategic resource which can provide major competitive strengths for a business. Today's manufacturing managers must look to the future to plan, set objectives, initiate strategy, establish policies, and commit resources. The goal is attainment of a sustainable competitive advantage.

Prerequisite: MGMT 578

BUSI 594, Emerging Trends in Information Technology, 3 Units

This course, intended for students without a background in information technology (IT), surveys current topics in IT and their impact on business, management, organizations, and society. Course topics include business intelligence, cybersecurity, business analytics, social networks, data visualization, agile software development, and business process management. Students develop a sufficient understanding of how organizations can utilize technologies, get hands-on skill development using real-world tools and deliverables, and explore management and organizational issues associated with technological change.

BUSI 595, Capability Design and Management of Strategic Change, 3 Units

Management capabilities and components, strategic diagnosis, and capability design are addressed. The course introduces state-of-the-art, real-time planning systems, including crisis management. Evaluation of organizational dynamics during discontinuous strategic changes is addressed. Strategic diagnosis and capability design are applied to a successful operation of a corporate firm.

BUSI 597, Field Experience, 2 Units

This program of study exposes students to the inner workings of several different organizations, research and development, and manufacturing facilities. The commonalities and differences students observe stimulates their thinking with regard to what matters and what works. The course consists of an intensive fieldwork experience as well as assigned readings that focus on firsthand experiences of business leaders. Grading is Pass/Fail.

BUSI 598, Executive Seminar, 1 Unit

This seminar introduces contemporary issues within business, human resources, and/or organizational development, and their impact on organizational effectiveness. Seminars focus on skill development to improve working environments and interactions among employees, leaders, organizations, and communities. May be taken three times with different topics.

BUSI 599, Readings in Business, 1-3 Units

Students may enroll in an independent study for unit credit to investigate subjects and interests that lie beyond regular course offerings, explore topics in greater depth, and/or initiate individual projects. Such requests must be developed in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and be approved by the graduate program chair and dean. Unit credit varies depending on the scope of the study plan.

ECON 250, Principles of Macroeconomics, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to concepts and tools of economic analysis for macroeconomics. Students study national income and economic growth, interest rates, unemployment, and government fiscal and monetary policies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH 110 or MATH 151 or MATH 165, or 60 or higher on the ALEKS math placement assessment.

ECON 251, Principles of Microeconomics, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to concepts and tools of economic analysis for microeconomics. Students study the interactions of firms and consumers: consumer demands, firm costs, price determination under various market structures, and the role of government in a market economy.

Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH 110 or MATH 151 or MATH 165, or 60 or higher on the ALEKS math placement assessment.

ECON 350, Intermediate Macroeconomics, 3 Units

This course develops more complex economic models applicable to the study of such topics as economic growth; the effects of monetary policy on business cycles, prices and interest rates; government spending and debt; and the macroeconomy with trade.

Prerequisite: ECON 250; MATH 151 or MATH 165

ECON 351, Intermediate Microeconomics, 3 Units

This course expands the concepts and tools of economic analysis developed in the Principles of Microeconomics course. The course develops more in-depth models of interactions in society: consumer choice, firm decisions, perfect and imperfect competition. Issues of uncertainty and strategic interaction are addressed as well as extensions to multiple markets.

Prerequisite: ECON 251; MATH 151 or MATH 165

ECON 355, Environmental Economics, 3 Units

This course applies economic perspectives and analytical tools to the study of environmental problems. It focuses on decisions that have environmental impacts and on the economic impact of environmental policies. The effect of business activities on the environment and the effects of policy on business are of specific concern.

Prerequisite: ECON 251

ECON 356, Labor Economics, 3 Units

This course examines the allocation of labor in a society among its various possible uses. Students consider the role of markets in allocating this labor, issues of market power, and the role of government policy in accomplishing social objectives. Wage determination, job search, and labor productivity are also discussed.

Prerequisite: ECON 251

ECON 357, Economics of the Developing World, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the economic and social issues confronting the majority of people in the world. Students survey the current conditions of people in the developing world and build ways of understanding the complex issues that they face. Using these tools, students examine economic and financial infrastructure, political conditions, levels and trends in poverty and income distribution, job creation and economic growth, health and education, and environmental conditions which all affect the state of "development" of a people.

Prerequisite: ECON 250 and ECON 251

ECON 359, Urban and Regional Economics, 3 Units

This course combines the disciplines of economics and geography. Economic interactions among individuals, firms, and governmental units are analyzed geographically by focusing on central cities, suburbs, and outlying regions. Within this urban and regional context, this course places particular emphasis on market forces, land use, transportation, crime, housing, and local government. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

Prerequisite: ECON 250 and ECON 251

ECON 371, Comparative Economics, 3 Units

Students are offered an integrated treatment of policy, institutions, business, and international trade theory within the different types of economic systems. The values that societies hold are examined as reasons for why different systems are chosen in different countries. The course studies the economics of both market economies and socialist economies, examining their domestic and international policies toward economic interactions.

Prerequisite: ECON 250

ECON 452, Econometrics, 3 Units

This course introduces students to econometric analysis to better understand the economic environment. Cross-sectional regression analysis and time series methods are covered, and serial correlation and heteroskedasticity are addressed. Panel data methods are introduced, as well as such topics as instrumental variables and simultaneous equation estimation.

Prerequisite: ECON 350; ECON 351 (may be taken concurrently); MATH 130 or MATH 361

ECON 453, Microfinance and Microenterprise, 3 Units

Microfinance and microenterprise development are strategies for strengthening the economic opportunities of poorer households to enable families to build assets, provide income, and plan for a better future. This course examines these approaches in depth and evaluates the effectiveness of various projects at accomplishing their stated goals.

Prerequisite: ECON 250, ECON 251, and Junior Standing

ECON 454, Industrial Organization and Regulation, 3 Units

This course investigates the importance of market structure for firm and consumer outcomes beyond the standard perfect competition and monopoly models. Students will learn to incorporate real world attributes into their understanding of market activity through case studies and advanced market models. Topics to be addressed include cartels, entry and exit, oligopoly, price discrimination, and research and development.

Prerequisite: ECON 351; ECON 350 (may be taken concurrently)

ECON 458, Economics and Religion, 3 Units

This course provides students an opportunity to examine the relationship between religion and economic life in terms of individuals' actions and the elements of the economic system. In particular, students examine the relationship between economic behavior/institutions and Islam, Confucianism, and Christianity.

Prerequisite: ECON 350, ECON 351 (may be taken concurrently), Junior Standing.

ECON 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This program of study concentrates on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time faculty member.

ECON 502, Business Economics, 3 Units

This course provides a survey of the concepts and tools of economic analysis of both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students study the basics of interactions between firms and consumers: consumer demands, firm costs, production decisions, resources utilization and price determination under various market structures, market entry and exit decisions, and the role of government in the markets of an economy. Students learn the basic mathematical models needed to begin analyzing business decisions. Students also develop basic tools to analyzing the fundamentals of national income and economic growth, interest rates, unemployment, and government fiscal and monetary policies. A number of current national and international issues will be analyzed using these tools.

ECON 521, Managerial Economics, 3 Units

Students learn to think strategically about the economic environment in which a firm operates. The first half of the course covers the foundations of microeconomics (supply and demand, market price and output, production, cost, and simple competitive market equilibrium). The second half deals with applying microeconomic theory to economic strategy, including more sophisticated pricing and competitive strategies. Case based.

ECON 575, Global Business Economics, 3 Units

This course covers the concepts of global economics, measurement of economic performance, macroeconomic indicators affecting the global business environment, sources of country-specific economic data and data evaluation, microeconomic analysis of decisions in multinational firms, and economic performance forecasting. It also explores the global economic environment of business, including socioeconomic goals and policies that impact multinational business performance and global business strategies, as well as international economic forces influencing business decisions and the firm. It further explores global business economic cases featuring methodology and research perspectives of economics and the contribution of the economics paradigm to business decisions and processes.

Prerequisite: ECON 521

ENTR 210, Small Business Ventures, 3 Units

Students in this course apply their leadership, problem-solving, and strategy skills to consider how winning entrepreneurs think, act, and perform, then establish goals to practice emulating those actions, attitudes, and strategies. New venture creation is about the process of getting a new venture started, growing the venture, successfully harvesting it, and starting again.

Prerequisite: BUSI 110

ENTR 312, Creativity and Innovation, 3 Units

Students in this course investigate innovation in the corporate setting and the personal creative process, with an emphasis on understanding the role innovation plays in corporate success. Via lectures and personal exercises designed to build information content and a repertoire of specific techniques, students learn and apply the practical toolkit for sharpening and implementing their innovative and creative skills.

Prerequisite: BUSI 110

ENTR 314, Entrepreneurial Management, 3 Units

Students apply their creative and innovative talents while sharpening their analytical abilities. Students will develop a new business idea and craft it into a comprehensive business plan that details the qualitative (e.g. business modeling and milestone planning) and quantitative (financial forecasts and valuation) process of bringing a new venture idea to fruition. The business plan that each team develops is an operating plan for a start-up company or a new venture within a larger corporation.

Prerequisite: ENTR 310

ENTR 315, Social Entrepreneurship, 3 Units

Social entrepreneurship is an emerging and rapidly changing field dedicated to the starting and growing of social mission-driven ventures - organizations that strive to advance social change through innovative solutions. This course exposes students to viable business models in social enterprise, focusing on the ideas, process, steps, and strategies required for creating new social ventures. Through lectures, case studies, and classroom dialogue, students will learn to think strategically and to act opportunistically with balanced social and financial perspective.

Prerequisite: BUSI 110

ENTR 420, Entrepreneurship and Innovation Practicum, 3 Units

This course gives students practical experience through guest speakers and company visits, and through work in an entrepreneurial or innovative organization, with students translating those experiences into academic learning. With close guidance from practicum faculty, students identify and work with a business or a public or nonprofit organization. Working individually or in small teams, students complete a defined project of approximately 100 hours that has practical value and academic rigor. Students provide regular status reports and receive faculty coaching during the practicum.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

ENTR 520, Entrepreneurial Decision Making, 3 Units

This course covers the tactical and strategic decisions that are essential for successfully starting and managing a new business. The course provides the framework for students to learn the application of practical business knowledge and tactics in transforming entrepreneurial vision into winning business strategies and thriving entrepreneurial ventures. Students learn the techniques for successful entrepreneurial decisions, including modeling successful business and strategic plans; effectively targeting, evaluating, and identifying alternate financing sources; competitive pricing, product differentiation, and market targeting as key drivers for sales growth and profitability; and effective competitive and risk assessment, analysis, and management.

ENTR 524, New Venture Creation, 3 Units

Students review the experiences entrepreneurs encounter in conceiving and launching a business. The course combines personal assessment and involvement exercises with an emphasis on group interactions, personal planning, and contemplating an entrepreneurial career. Team activities, personal planning exercises, new venture simulation, and case studies are utilized. Students analyze factors affecting purchase decisions in the marketplace, apply behavioral and social science concepts to the study of buyer behavior, and study methods that organizations use for personal selling, sales promotion, public relations, the art of negotiating, and other forms of promotion to communicate with customers and prospects.

ENTR 525, Entrepreneurial Venture Analysis, 3 Units

This course covers case studies and analysis of entrepreneurial ventures and the identification of the different ways management concepts and techniques are applied in developing innovative businesses, standardizing products, designing processes, and operating tools. The course explores the identification of the systems and analytical decision models applied in various entrepreneurial operating functions and the techniques for setting performance standards and designing the activities required to drastically upgrade the yield from resources in order to create new markets and new customers. It evaluates the complex dynamics of entrepreneurial challenges in modern theory and practice through the use of case studies of entrepreneurial ventures.

FIN 300, Business Finance for Managers, 3 Units

This course introduces concepts and tools of business finance for managers. Students study financial statements and their interpretation, business performance measures, the management of cash and the short-term financial needs of the organization, and how to make good capital budgeting decisions. Credit is not given for both FIN 300 and FIN 320. FIN 300 does not satisfy the prerequisites of any course requiring FIN 320 as a prerequisite.

Prerequisite: ACCT 120, MATH 110; business management majors only.

FIN 320, Principles of Corporate Finance, 3 Units

Students in this course explore the principles and practices of financial management. Sources and methods of raising capital, allocation of funds within the firm, cash flow and financial statement analysis, financial markets, and capital budgeting techniques are addressed. Additional concepts covered include present-value analysis, long-term financial planning, risk and return, and basic derivatives.

Prerequisite: ACCT 120 and BUSI 311 or MATH 151 or MATH 165 (May be taken concurrently)

FIN 330, Financial Analysis, 3 Units

This course equips students with the necessary tools of financial statement analysis for business valuation and strategic considerations. Students explore the ideas of ratio analysis and time value of money in discounted cash flows in order to analyze the financial conditions of a business organization. Course material also covers credit analysis and corporate finance issues such as merger and acquisition and debt financing. Case studies are used extensively.

Prerequisite: ACCT 121 and FIN 320

FIN 331, Managerial Finance, 3 Units

This course extends the concepts and methodologies introduced in Principles of Finance to incorporate the practical uses as a manager in an organization. The course places emphasis on managerial decisions using spreadsheet applications. Topics include: financial statement analysis, project analysis, long-term financial planning, risk and return, and basic derivatives.

Prerequisite: FIN 320 or Instructor's consent

FIN 338, Applied Portfolio Management, 3 Units

Students in this course engage in practical application of financial investment principles and theory through a portfolio management opportunity in a business setting. Students learn to set portfolio objectives and measure performance against specific metrics in the business setting through a structured reporting process with the instructor.

Prerequisite: FIN 320 and MATH 130

FIN 352, Financial Markets and Institutions, 3 Units

This course covers financial markets, instruments, and institutions, with students examining the roles of depository institutions, insurance companies, and others in the process of intermediation. The structure of financial markets, recent developments in financial instruments, interest rate determination, and the regulatory environment are discussed.

Prerequisite: ECON 250 or instructor consent; B- or higher in MATH 110

FIN 372, International Trade and Finance, 3 Units

Students study the theory and practice of international trade and international finance. The course addresses questions of why countries trade, what they trade, and national and global trade policies. Also, foreign exchange markets, exchange rate determination, foreign direct investment, and international capital markets are studied.

Prerequisite: ECON 250 and ECON 251

FIN 432, Investment Analysis, 3 Units

This course introduces the student to the basic tools of investment analysis and integrates these with the actual operations of investments and portfolio construction. The emphasis is on providing analyses of asset selection with an experience of real market activities.

Prerequisite: FIN 320; MATH 151 or MATH 165, FIN 352 (may be taken concurrently) or Instructor's consent

FIN 434, Derivatives, 3 Units

This course prepares students with a basic understanding of derivatives of financial assets and commodities (such as futures, options, swaps, etc.). Pricing of these derivatives and their function in hedging and speculation is discussed. Recent innovations of pricing models for instruments such as interest rate derivatives, exotic options, and assessment of market risk based on the market prices of derivatives are also covered.

Prerequisite: FIN 432, MATH 130

FIN 436, Financial Risk Management, 3 Units

The course introduces students to the theory and management tools of risk management and financial innovation, including the use of different combinations of financial assets and derivatives to immunize an organization's market risk. Topics include dynamic hedging using derivatives such as futures and options, and possibly the development of new products (or combinations) to protect a business or portfolio from exposure to financial risk.

Prerequisite: FIN 320, FIN 338 (may be taken concurrently), and FIN 432 or instructor's consent

FIN 439, Seminar in Finance, 3 Units

This course covers case studies in corporate finance, such as corporate strategy and structure, capital structure and payout policy, raising capital, corporate restructuring, and corporate governance. The course provides students with an understanding of the strategic issues of corporate financial management. In particular, advanced topics such as assessment and analysis of market volatility, evolution of financial structures, and strategies are also covered.

Prerequisite: FIN 330, FIN 432 or instructor consent

FIN 502, Business Finance for Managers, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to concepts and tools of business finance for managers. Students study financial statements and their interpretation, business performance measures, the management of cash and the short term financial needs of the organization, and how to make good capital budgeting decisions. Students will analyze company performance and make recommendations by applying class content to financial issues.

FIN 513, Corporate Finance, 3 Units

Students in this course examine how financial decisions can affect the value and health of firms. Topics include cash flow and ratio analysis, discounted cash flow analysis, stock and bond valuation, investment criteria and decisions, capital budgeting, capital structure decisions, risk-return analysis, and long-term and short-term financing decisions. In addition, students read and discuss articles related to God's financial principles.

Prerequisite: ACCT 512

FIN 526, Capital Formation, 3 Units

Students study the market processes by which resources are allocated, from the capital formation of economic activities of the economy's various sectors to the financial activities in the money and capital markets. Specifically, the course includes the use of flow of funds analysis as applied to capital markets and various financial chronicles as sources for explaining and predicting economic behavior; the theory and reality of the interest rate structure; the nature of various capital markets and their securities; knowledge of corporate debt and equity instruments; federal, state, and local government securities; and mortgages. This course leads to a basic knowledge and understanding of the sources and uses of funds and the role of financial intermediation in the growth and development of economies.

Prerequisite: FIN 513

FIN 536, Entrepreneurial Finance, 3 Units

This course examines the financial decisions of entrepreneurs and venture capital investors based on the stages of a venture development. Topics include financial options for entrepreneurs and investors, preparations for and analysis of a new business' financial statements, and the valuation of the venture.

Prerequisite: FIN 513

FIN 546, Investments, 3 Units

This course provides students with the study of financial instruments. Along with the knowledge of investment principles, students focus on the decision process for evaluating various investment opportunities. In addition, students discuss their stewardship responsibilities to God as individual Christian investors and Christian financial managers in a corporation.

Prerequisite: FIN 513

FIN 567, Advanced Financial Analysis, 3 Units

Students explore the practical applications of financial management based on case studies. Major topics include financial statement analysis, financial forecasting, cost of capital estimation, capital budgeting decisions, capital structure decisions, equity financing, and mergers and acquisitions.

Prerequisite: FIN 513

HROD 500, Foundations of Human Resource Development, 3 Units

The course provides an introduction to and overview of the field of human resource development with emphasis upon its historical and philosophical foundations. Theories and concepts relevant to the field are analyzed. Special emphasis is placed on the roles and functions of OD professionals within organizations and understanding the basic competencies of professional practice.

HROD 501, Organizational Design and the Psychology of Work Behavior, 3 Units

This course examines the fundamental theories and viewpoints on the nature of work, its role in adult life, and the function of employment organizations. Included is discussion of forces impacting individual, group, and system performance and productivity within complex sociotechnical systems. Particular emphasis is placed on examining the role of work in the growth and functioning of humans and in identifying the characteristics of organizations in which both the human needs of the people who compose the organization and the organization as a productive, adaptive entity are satisfied.

HROD 512, Employee Development, 3 Units

This course introduces theories of human growth and development as a foundation for understanding the developmental challenges facing individuals during their lifespans. Specific implications and applications are made related to how human growth and development is effected by and affects organizational life.

HROD 520, Career Development Systems, 3 Units

Students study the emerging field of career planning and development related to initial and ongoing professional development. Current literature, relevant theories, and major approaches to career planning and development are examined in accordance with career planning and development approaches in organizations. Students use various self-assessment tools and diagnostic instruments to evaluate data on their own work histories, interests, skills, and values.

HROD 530, Labor Law and Negotiations for Human Resource Professionals, 3 Units

This course provides a brief introduction to the pervasiveness and importance of labor law and negotiations. All human resources professionals must understand labor law and the rights given to employees pursuant to those laws, regardless of whether the employees are members of a union. Professionals must also be thoroughly versed in collective bargaining and the labor relations process in order to be prepared to work for companies whose employees are either represented by a union or are seeking to join a union. Course material equips students for these tasks, as well as for involvement in negotiating agreements and resolving conflicts, such as collective bargaining agreements, agreements with benefit plan providers, individual employee claims, and the terms of employment for new employees.

Prerequisite: MGMT 517

HROD 531, Designing and Managing Compensation and Benefit Systems, 3 Units

This course provides a solid understanding of the art of compensation practice and its role in promoting companies' competitive advantages. Compensation systems in organizations must be linked to organizational objectives and strategies. Scholars and managers agree that the way compensation is allocated among employees sends a message about what management believes is important and the types of activities it encourages. With the responsibility of administering compensation expenditures wisely, HR professionals must balance the interests and costs of employers with the needs and expectations of employees.

Prerequisite: MGMT 517

HROD 532, Human Resource Law, 3 Units

Human resources professionals are routinely called upon to navigate a number of legal issues. This course introduces the major laws governing human resource management in the work place beginning with the core skills it takes to safely interview job candidates, counsel employees, and mediate disputes. Students gain a thorough understanding of EEOC and ADA regulations and learn how to comply with the Family and Medical Leave Act. Emphasis is on the laws about unlawful discrimination, recruiting, hiring, promotions, harassment, and reasonable accommodation.

Prerequisite: MGMT 517

HROD 550, Instructional Design and Training Methods, 3 Units

This course focuses on methods to assess an organization's training and development needs, and designing and implementing training programs to address those needs. Analysis and application of adult-learning theories in relation to program design are explored. Methods of instructional design and course development are emphasized.

HROD 575, Leveraging Diverse Community Partnerships, 3 Units

Students gain an in-depth understanding of the recruitment and retention of diverse workforces. This course gives students practical methods for recruiting employees from diverse backgrounds through the development of culturally sensitive marketing and recruiting materials. It also addresses issues regarding the management, retention, and advancement of employees from diverse backgrounds.

HROD 576, Managing in a Multicultural Context, 3 Units

This course focuses on developing an understanding of diversity and cultural difference. Students examine effective and ineffective management techniques and learn helpful approaches to conflict resolution in multicultural work environments.

HROD 577, Cultural Explorations in Global Business, 3 Units

Future business leaders engage their own and others' cultures in the context of a global marketplace while understanding how those cultures may impact the bottom line. Students also investigate the complexities of company demands to increase compliance with international business standards.

HROD 578, Recruiting and Retaining a Diverse Workforce, 3 Units

In leveraging diverse community partnerships, students learn practical methods for developing culturally sensitive marketing campaigns for the purpose of recruiting diverse employees into multiple areas of industry. Also, issues regarding management and retention of employees from diverse backgrounds are examined, including glass ceiling issues.

HROD 599, Readings in Human and Organizational Development, 1-3 Units

Students may enroll in an independent study for unit credit. In this course, students investigate subjects and interests that lie beyond regular course offerings, explore topics in greater depth, and/or initiate individual projects. It provides an opportunity to identify and develop an area of study of particular concern to the individual learner. Readings are pursued in accordance with a study plan developed in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and approved by the graduate programs chair and dean. Course requirements typically involve a literature review and submission of a paper. Unit credit varies depending on the scope of the study plan.

IBUS 374, Topics in International Management and Strategy, 3 Units

Students in this course analyze operational management issues encountered in international and culturally diverse enterprises. Course material may focus on human resource management, production management, cross-cultural issues, or strategic planning and implications for the firm.

Prerequisite: BUSI 370

IBUS 479, Import/Export Practicum, 3 Units

In this project-based class, students gain practical knowledge of the business of imports and exports. Students are expected to start a one-semester small business importing a product from abroad and selling it domestically. Key assignments may include a market analysis, sourcing analysis, business plan, importing a sample, and selling the sample. Students have freedom of scope and scale when deciding which product(s) should comprise the project.

Prerequisite: BUSI 370 or instructor consent

MGMT 210, Principles of Management, 3 Units

In this course, elements of planning, organizing, leading, and control are covered. Particular emphasis is given to organizing and actuating responsibility and authority, delegation, decentralization, the role of staff, line-staff relationship committees, boards of directors, organization charting, formal and informal organization, communication, and reaction to change.

MGMT 311, Leadership In Management, 3 Units

This course covers contemporary theories, principles, and practices of leadership within the context of managing businesses and organizations, introducing leadership topics such as change management, developing leaders and followers, and organizational communication. Significant attention is given to students' personal assessment and evaluation of their personality, strengths, leadership styles, and work, in order to establish a leadership and management identity.

Prerequisite: MGMT 210

MGMT 312, Managing Teams and Groups, 3 Units

This course introduces students to essential theories and concepts for analyzing, understanding, and managing groups and teams in the workplace. The course examines components that comprise teams, helps students develop skills in diagnosing opportunities and threats that face teams, and enhances teamwork expertise. Significant time is spent exploring interpersonal processes, conflict resolution, and characteristics that influence the effectiveness of a team. This course also provides an understanding of principles and processes necessary for leading teams effectively in a wide variety of situations.

Prerequisite: MGMT 210

MGMT 335, Real Estate Management, 3 Units

This course offers an introduction to real estate principles and practices, essential real estate law, practices incidental to ownership, real estate brokerage, and property evaluation.

MGMT 350, Business Management Internship, 3 Units

This course gives students the opportunity to apply their knowledge of principle and theory, and practice their skills and abilities, in an actual business setting through an internship. Course format is similar to that of an independent study, combining in-class meetings, online lesson plans, and real-life work experience. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: Completion of 60 units, and instructor consent.

MGMT 410, Production Management, 3 Units

This course focuses on decision making and allocation control regarding personnel, materials, and machine utilization in a manufacturing environment. Handling and control of materials, inventory, purchasing, and quality control are addressed. Students also learn about setting standards and developing skills in estimating, forecasting, and scheduling.

Prerequisite: MGMT 210, MATH 110

MGMT 440, Business Process Management, 3 Units

Business processes are the core of organizations, providing service to customers, impacting operations and cost structures, and defining enterprise software requirements. In this course, students explore what business processes are-how they are defined, documented, and managed. The course introduces the role of business architect as the initial developer of an enterprise software solution, and features real-world software tools, since software develops (and demands) a deeper understanding of the complexity and nuances associated with business process management. The course is suitable for all business students, since technology has become such a critical component of business.

Prerequisite: BUSI 240

MGMT 445, Human Resource Management, 3 Units

Students in this course study the human factors in modern business, particularly how they affect and are influenced by labor-management interactions and personnel relations, techniques, and procedures.

Prerequisite: MGMT 210

MGMT 448, Organizational and Administrative Behavior, 3 Units

Organizational behavior is an interdisciplinary field drawing from psychology, sociology, economics, organization theory, statistics, and other areas. In this course, students gain an understanding of the field and the various research strategies involved as they examine human behavior in organizations, as well as individual, group, and organization-level processes that impact workplace behavior and organizational life. Students are exposed to organizational behavioral science theories and their applications in different management settings and types of organizations, and have an opportunity to engage in experiential and skill-building activities, applying conceptual frameworks in community settings and developing strategies for increasing stakeholder and civic participation. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

Prerequisite: MGMT 210

MGMT 450, Strategic Management, 3 Units

This course focuses on fundamental decisions in the life of a business: What is the business, and what should it be? What are the objectives? How are priorities set? How are strategic, long-range decisions to be handled? To grow or not to grow--and what is the right size for the business? Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: MGMT 210; FIN 300 or FIN 320; MKTG 260; junior standing.

MGMT 501, Managerial Communication, 3 Units

Management, by definition, is achieving results with and through other people. Therefore, all of the technical and analytical skills in the world are useless unless you can communicate- that is, explain, persuade, and collaborate with others either by writing, interacting one-on-one, or presenting to a group. This course is aimed at equipping students with the necessary techniques and skills of research and communication used to inform others, inspire them and enlist their activity and willing cooperation.

MGMT 502, Developing Management Skills, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to management skills necessary for the twenty-first century characterized by chaotic, transformational, and rapid-fire change. Scientific evidence demonstrates how management skills are associated with personal and organizational successes. Although management skills are applicable in most areas of your life, this course will focus on work setting management skills to help students improve their own competency in a managerial role.

MGMT 503, Business Strategy: Theory and Practice, 3 Units

This course provides a review of management as an area of theoretical development as well as a field of practice. It comprises classical management theories and modern approaches to organization and business. Main blocks of the course are functions of management, managerial processes and interaction between organizations and their environment. This course includes elements of organizational behavior. Business cases are used as application of theoretical concepts.

MGMT 510, Current Issues in Business and Management, 3 Units

This course examines organizational and behavioral problems facing managers. Students develop an awareness of modern concepts, strategies, and techniques that can enhance organizational effectiveness. Among these subjects are organizational design, personal leadership and delegation, communication, conflict management, and interpersonal perception group dynamics.

MGMT 515, Applied Research and Analysis, 3 Units

Students study research methodology as it relates to needs for research-derived information, with emphasis on the research process in the development of primary and secondary research information, conducting research related to given products or services, and the analysis and evaluation of actual business organizations.

MGMT 516, High Performance People Management, 3 Units

This course provides students with the social science tools needed to solve organizational problems and influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations. It prepares managers to understand how to best organize and motivate the human capital of the firm, manage social networks and alliances, and execute strategic change. Case based

MGMT 517, Managing Human Capital, 3 Units

Students study the establishment of human resource objectives and requirements in an organization. Emphasis is on executive decision making in dealing with formal employee-employer relationships. Collective bargaining, organization of employees, negotiation, and administration of collective bargaining agreements are covered.

Prerequisite: HROD 500 or GNRS 560

MGMT 521, Organizational Development and Change, 3 Units

Students investigate the emerging field of organizational development (OD) - major theories, basic concepts, and primary intervention strategies. Emphasis is placed on diagnosing the relationship between an organization's mission and culture, and facilitating system-wide, planned changes to improve organizational effectiveness.

Prerequisite: MGMT 515 and MGMT 516

MGMT 529, Ethical Decision Making, 3 Units

This course raises students' moral recognition level, provides them with the apparatus to make moral decisions in a business context, and considers ethical problems in business according to Christian principles. Emphasis is placed on the role of the leader in organizations.

MGMT 540, Diversity for Strategic Advantage, 3 Units

This course introduces the major goals, principles, and concepts of multiculturalism with particular emphasis on its impact on organizational effectiveness. It explores the cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic factors influencing the workplace. This course offers concepts to improve learning and working environments and interaction among employees, businesses, and communities.

MGMT 541, Global Business Management, 3 Units

This course focuses on the environmental and functional differences between U.S. and international business, including exporting, balance payments, strategic planning, organization of multinational firms, international financial planning and cash management, foreign exchange planning, comparative management philosophies, international marketing strategies, incorporation for international operations and external relations of the multinational corporation.

MGMT 551, Leadership in Organizations, 3 Units

This course introduces current literature and theories of leadership. Leadership within organizational settings is examined. Leadership dilemmas and issues are analyzed (e.g., ethics, decision making, power and authority, conflict management). Emphasis is placed on identifying and enhancing leadership in organizational settings.

MGMT 561, Managing Teams and Conflict, 3 Units

This course helps the student understand small-group behavior. It uses experience-based methods, cases, reading material, and simulation, and examines role behavior, group dynamics, conflict control, leadership, and group development. It also addresses motivation and problem solving as essential elements of organizational behavior.

MGMT 570, Organizational Performance Improvement, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to fundamental concepts and methods of quality and productivity improvement and examination of the OD professional's role in designing and implementing programs to improve quality of products and services. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the forces that make quality and productivity critical organizational issues.

Prerequisite: MGMT 521

MGMT 577, Global Field Study, 0 Units

This course provides the framework for graduate students to register for and complete a global field study in various countries around the world. During the course, students conduct corporate visits to business firms locally and around the globe to discuss how they apply and practice the business management principles, concepts and theories covered in the graduate curriculum.

MGMT 578, Strategic Management, 3 Units

Taken in the last semester, this course explores how to convert executive vision into definitive plans that can be operationally implemented, and provides opportunity for practice and experimentation in strategy formulation and change management. Students use strategy support systems to transition from a change-resistant operational approach to a future-oriented approach characteristic of strategic thinking. Case and project based.

Prerequisite: FIN 513, ACCT 512, BUSI 511, and MKTG 527

MGMT 581, Ethical Leadership, 3 Units

This course provides a foundation for two integrative themes - leadership and ethics. Leadership is examined from both a theoretical and practical perspective, with an emphasis on servant leadership. An ethical framework for management decision-making is established and used. Students will learn about their spiritual gifts, strengths themes, personality types, and leadership styles, and will explore how to effectively apply them in leadership settings.

MGMT 582, Strategic Management in Not-for-Profit, 3 Units

This course offers a study of the strategic management issues which are unique to government and other not-for-profit organizations. Included are: defining characteristics of different types of not-for-profit organizations; convergence of environmental demands on not-for-profit organizations and business firms; power in not-for-profit organizations; multiple stakeholder and stakeholder power; formulation of legitimacy strategy; and success measurement in not-for-profit organizations.

Prerequisite: BUSI 450 or equivalent

MGMT 583, Global Strategic Management, 3 Units

The course explores the main issues that companies and their managers confront when they 'go global' or 'manage globally'. Students gain both theoretical and practical insight into the management of a global organization to appreciate the opportunities, problems (both worldwide and local), and alternative strategies for globalization or localization.

MGMT 597, Master's Project in Management, 3 Units

This capstone course involves the implementation and application of management theory. Students participate in a service-learning project for a community-based organization, applying management methodology. Students are expected to complete a master's level research project demonstrating competency in management theory, the individual area of emphasis, as well as faith integration.

Prerequisite: MGMT 521; final semester of MAM program

MKTG 260, Principles of Marketing, 3 Units

The movement of goods from producers to consumers is analyzed in this course, which includes discussion of the channels of distribution, marketing functions, management considerations, and problems in marketing practice. Marketing trends in current economic systems are reviewed.

MKTG 350, Marketing Internship, 1-3 Units

This course integrates marketing principles and theory into a working environment related to marketing. Includes research, setting objectives, general marketing decision making, and reflection.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260, completion of 60 units, and instructor consent.

MKTG 361, Integrated Marketing Communications, 3 Units

The marketing communication function is introduced. Topics include advertising theory and measurement, communication theory, promotional strategies, the IMC mix, public relations and publicity, consumer education, creative strategy, and promotional ethics.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260

MKTG 362, Consumer Behavior, 3 Units

This course involves a comprehensive examination of the nature of markets and the factors influencing market development and change. Students study individual consumer behavior in relation to the buying-selling process, with emphasis on understanding the consumer in order to facilitate the development of an effective marketing strategy.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260

MKTG 363, Marketing Research, 3 Units

This course is an overview and practical application of contemporary methods for gathering, analyzing, and preparing market research for use in management decision making. Research methodology includes specific topic areas as the research process, primary and secondary data, qualitative and quantitative research methods, statistical analysis, and utilization of technology.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260 and MATH 130

MKTG 364, Sales and Sales Management, 3 Units

In this course, consideration is given to personal sales strategies and practices, including relationship management, negotiation, consultative selling, and key account management. The sales management function, including recruiting and selecting salespeople, motivation and training, compensation plans and quotas, supervising, sales forecasting and budgeting, salesforce evaluation, and the ethics in selling and sales management is covered.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260 or instructor consent

MKTG 368, Retail Management, 3 Units

Students learn the principles of retail marketing of products and services. The course emphasizes the unique issues and problems of store managers, merchandising executives, and service company managers. Location, sales promotion, organization, human resources management, procurement, inventory, product mix and profitability, traditional and online retail methods are considered.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260

MKTG 369, Global Industrial Marketing, 3 Units

Students learn the marketing of business goods by manufacturers to other businesses, government agencies, and social institutions. The course consists of market analysis, sales forecasting, product strategy, effective use of sales force, and industrial promotional planning and implementation. Extensive quantitative techniques are utilized.

Prerequisite: MKTG 362, MKTG 363

MKTG 373, Global Marketing Management, 3 Units

This course is an overview of international marketing and considers the powerful economic, technological, industrial, political, and demographic forces that are converging to build the foundation of a global marketplace in a dynamic and ever-changing world. Students conduct projects involving international marketing.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260 and BUSI 370

MKTG 465, Strategic Marketing Management, 3 Units

This course offers a strategic approach to the management of the marketing function. As the capstone course for marketing majors, students utilize marketing case analysis to examine and evaluate the entire marketing decision-making process. Course content focuses on the strategic analysis of market opportunities and the development of the marketing mix through project coursework.

Prerequisite: MKTG 361, MKTG 362

MKTG 466, Digital Marketing, 3 Units

Within an organization's strategic and business objectives, digital marketing leverages traditional marketing, utilizing essential digital marketing tools such as online branding, display advertising, social media marketing and Search Engine Optimization. Course content will emphasize the development of digital marketing strategies and programs for an organization.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260

MKTG 502, Marketing Principles, 3 Units

This course focuses on understanding marketing management, formulating and implementing marketing strategies, and provides a systematic framework for marketing planning, analysis and evaluation. The characteristics and management of markets are described in topics that include the marketing environment, components of the marketing mix, market segmentation, positioning and targeting.

MKTG 515, Marketing Research, 3 Units

This course prepares students to approach marketing research from a management perspective. The role of marketing research process, the human side of marketing research, and organizational and ethical issues are discussed. Students utilize comprehensive cases and analysis, along with a marketing research project.

Prerequisite: MKTG 527 and BUSI 511

MKTG 527, Marketing Strategy, 3 Units

This course offers in-depth management, analysis, and decision making resources related to marketing strategy, including environmental turbulence, competitive analysis, customer and market analysis, product life cycle analysis and marketing mix management. Issues will be discussed from a Christian worldview. It is primarily case-based.

MKTG 545, International Marketing, 3 Units

International marketing is the performance of business activities that direct the flow of a company's goods and services to consumers or users in more than one nation. The elements of the marketing mix (product, price, promotion, and place-channels of distribution) first studied in domestic marketing are analyzed in global terms, thus adding the elements of geography, cultural forces, and the structure of distribution to the uncontrollables with which the marketer must contend.

MKTG 565, Integrated Marketing Communications, 3 Units

In this course, the marketing communication function is introduced and analyzed. Topics include advertising theory, planning and measurement, communication theory, the IMC mix, promotional strategies, public relations and publicity, consumer education, collateral materials planning, and promotional ethics.

Prerequisite: MKTG 527

MKTG 580, Strategic Digital Marketing, 3 Units

This course discusses the differences between E-commerce and E-business in relation to the firm, emphasizing the correlation between business, technology, and society. An advanced marketing course, it builds on the firm's business model, which guides its traditional and dynamic online marketing presence. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the Christian worldview and community citizenship, and on developing a positive long-term relationship with customers and stakeholders, thereby creating a distinct competitive advantage for the firm. Student projects integrate learning activities with business organizations.

Prerequisite: MKTG 527

PRBA 120, Financial Accounting, 3 Units

This course introduces the financial accounting model and application of fundamental accounting principles. The corporate form of business serves as the primary model to demonstrate accounting principles for cash, accounts receivable, inventories, operational assets, liabilities and stockholders' equity. Students complete a computer simulation which introduces computer application in accounting.

PRBA 121, Managerial Accounting, 3 Units

This course introduces basic managerial accounting concepts and emphasizes the use of accounting data in decision making. Topics covered include cost accumulation models, cost behavior, break-even analysis, variable costing, budgeting, differential analysis, product pricing, capital expenditure analysis, and financial statement analysis.

Prerequisite: PRBA 120

PRBA 210, Principles of Management, 3 Units

Elements of planning, organizing, leading, and control are covered. Particular emphasis is given to organizing and actuating responsibility and authority, delegation, decentralization, the role of staff, line-staff relationship committees, board of directors, organization charting, formal and informal organization, communication, and reaction to change.

PRBA 240, Spreadsheets and Information Technology, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to information technology and its application to business, placing a special emphasis on developing spreadsheets to solve common business problems. The course builds a functional level of understanding for how components of information technology (hardware, software, databases, networks, etc.) work together to build interorganizational information systems such as supply chain management, enterprise resource planning, and customer relationship management.

PRBA 250, Principles of Macroeconomics, 3 Units

This course introduces concepts and tools of economic analysis for macroeconomics. Students study national income and economic growth, interest rates, unemployment, and government fiscal and monetary policies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

Prerequisite: C- or better in PRMA 110 or 60 or higher on ALEKS math placement assessment.

PRBA 251, Principles of Microeconomics, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to concepts and tools of economic analysis for microeconomics. Students study the interactions of firms and consumers: consumer demands, firm costs, price determination under various market structures, and the role of government in a market economy.

Prerequisite: C- or better in PRMA 110

PRBA 260, Marketing Principles, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practical application of marketing principles by examining concepts related to understanding, reaching, and responding to customers.

PRBA 296, Business Law, 3 Units

The course introduces the laws affecting business transactions. Included is an overview of the legal system as it relates to business and in-depth study of contracts, sales and commercial transactions, and secured transactions.

PRBA 300, Business Finance for Managers, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to concepts and tools of business finance for managers. Students study financial statements and their interpretation, business performance measures, the management of cash and the short term financial needs of the organization, and how to make good capital budgeting decisions.

Prerequisite: PRBA 120, BBA Majors only

PRBA 305, Operations Management, 3 Units

In this course, students learn about operations and productivity, operations strategy in a global environment, project management, forecasting, design of goods and services, quality management, process strategy, location strategies, layout strategies, job design and work management, supply chain management, inventory management, aggregate planning, materials requirements planning, scheduling, lean operations, and maintenance and reliability.

Prerequisite: PRMA 110

PRBA 313, Introduction to Supply Chain Management and Logistics, 3 Units

This course covers the formulation and implementation of logistics and supply chain strategy for competitive advantage, including analysis of logistics capabilities, enhancement of strategy-supportive capabilities, and integration with strategically chosen supply chain partners.

PRBA 315, Business System Analytics, 3 Units

This course introduces fundamental concepts and methods of business analysis (or analytics) and examines the role of managers in qualitative and quantitative analysis designed to foster efficient and effective operations of an organization. Emphasis is on understanding the tools and techniques needed for a successful manager in a global organization in the 21st century.

PRBA 317, Quality Management, 3 Units

This course introduces fundamental concepts and methods of quality management and productivity improvement, and examines the role of managers in designing and implementing programs to improve quality of products and services. Emphasis is on understanding the forces that make quality and productivity critical organizational issues. Student ability to implement quality-management tools, techniques, and processes is demonstrated.

PRBA 370, International Business, 3 Units

This course presents a survey of issues in international business, with focus on managing in an international environment, understanding the global monetary system, and developing an international perspective on business operations including production, marketing, finance, and human resources. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: PRBA 250

PRBA 445, Human Resource Management, 3 Units

Students study the human factors in modern business as they are influenced by and effect labor-management interactions, personnel relations, techniques, and procedures.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the School of Business and Management.

PRBA 448, Organization and Administrative Behavior, 3 Units

Organizational behavior is an interdisciplinary field drawing from numerous disciplines including psychology, sociology, economics, organization theory, statistics, and many others. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the field of organizational behavior and the various research strategies that it employs. This course will examine human behavior in organizations: individual, group and organizational level processes that impact workplace behavior and organizational life. Students will be exposed to organizational behavioral science theories and their applications in different management setting and a variety of organizations. Students will have an opportunity to engage in experiential and skill-building activities and apply conceptual frameworks in community settings and develop strategies for engaging stakeholder participation and increasing civic participation.

Prerequisite: PRBA 210

PRBA 450, Strategic Management, 3 Units

This course focuses on fundamental decisions in the life of a business: What is the business, and what should it be? What are the objectives? How are priorities set? How are strategic, long-range decisions to be handled? To grow or not to grow-and what is the right size for the business? Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: PRBA 210, PRBA 300, and Senior Status.

PRBA 495, Writing 3: Business Ethics, 3 Units

This course focuses on the integration of Christian faith, ethical issues, and professional concerns that confront business professionals in the workplace, with particular regard to leadership and transitions. Students in this course explore biblical and moral principles as related to real-life case studies, and have the opportunity to complete in-depth study in a business-related area to further prepare them as effective participants and leaders in the workplace. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: PRWR 261 and senior Standing

WEB 571, Web Site Design and Development, 3 Units

This course examines fundamental principles of website design, emphasizing considerations of functionality, information architecture, and usability. The course also introduces the students to prototyping tools used to develop and communicate website designs.

WEB 572, Emergent Information Technologies, 3 Units

This course involves the study of technological change, especially the effects of technological change on society and commerce and how these changes and effects transpire. The course also entails a study of key technologies that are having, or may have, significant effects on society and commerce.

WEB 573, Relational Database Technology, 3 Units

This course presents the relational database model and explains a process for relational database design, and covers the fundamentals of relational database creation and maintenance. It also explains the use of an application development environment, such as Allaire's Cold Fusion, to develop Web database applications.

WEB 575, Internet Business and Strategic Management, 3 Units

This course describes how the Internet has created demand for e-business, and how this new economic and technological shift has transformed the way in which business models are created. Major trends driving e-business are identified. E-business application architecture is reviewed. The importance of creating a customer relationship management (CRM) is emphasized. The significance of strategic management is paramount to a sustainable competitive advantage, where enterprise resource planning is being utilized. In this quickly changing environment, knowledge management becomes important to integrate technologies and solutions for organizations. Clarifying strategic objectives with the process improvement, strategic improvement, and business transformation are considered, along with elements of tactical execution options and e-project management.

Faculty

Interim Dean

Roxanne Helm-Stevens, DBA

Associate Dean

Ron Jewe, Ph.D.

Chair of Accounting and Economics

Ken Kederian, MBA, CPA, CGMA

Chair of Business, Management, and Marketing

Dan Kipley, DBA

Chair of Entrepreneurship, Finance, and International Business

Daniel Park, Ph.D.

LP and Bobbi Leung Chair of Accounting Ethics

John M. Thornton, Ph.D., CPA

Program Director, Regional Campuses

Marlon Ware, MBA

Professors

George Babbes, Ph.D.

Roger Conover, Ph.D.

Roxanne Helm-Stevens, DBA

Jau-Lian Jeng, Ph.D.

Ron Jewe, Ph.D.

Dan Kipley, DBA

Daniel Park, Ph.D.

John M. Thornton, Ph.D., CPA

Julia Underwood, Ph.D.

Associate Professors

Paul Anderson, CPA, MBA

Patricia Skalnik, DBA

Assistant Professors

Rachel Bodell, DBA

Lanelle Chase, MBA

Stephanie Geter, CPA, CFE, MBA

William Ingersoll, Ph.D.

Ken Kederian, MBA, CPA, CGMA

Marlon Ware, MBA

Fulbright Scholars

George Babbes, Ph.D.

Thomas Cairns, DBA

Stuart Strother, Ph.D.