School of Business and Management

Mission

The School of Business and Management is a Christ-centered community of scholars and professionals pursuing academic excellence to advance the work of God in the world, developing students of character and competence as difference makers in business and society.

Tenets

The School of Business and Management is committed to the following core principles:

Academic Excellence: Learning and producing scholarship in a community of excellence by:

  1. Viewing students as the first priority.
  2. Maintaining a dynamic teaching environment where relevant business and management theories and practical tools are imparted.
  3. Engaging in scholarship that advances the thinking in related fields, informs teaching, involves students, and serves communities in practical ways.
  4. Investing in campus infrastructure, technology, and alliances to enhance capabilities to learn and produce scholarship.
  5. Sustaining a learning environment that fosters critical analysis and creative thinking.

Students of Character: Learning and producing scholarship in a community of faith by:

  1. Modeling and infusing a Christian perspective of truth and life throughout SBM programs.
  2. Enlivening the mind and transforming the heart by developing important links between faith, learning, and application.
  3. Facilitating nurturing, caring, and mentoring relationships among faculty, staff, students, and alumni.
  4. Practicing God-honoring diversity.

Advance the Work of God in the World: Learning and producing scholarship to impact the world by:

  1. Helping students identify their strengths and providing mentoring to ensure those strengths are developed and utilized to benefit business and society.
  2. Using experiential, real-world, and service learning to create value for students and the community.
  3. Developing programs, alumni, and students that have an impact around the world.
  4. Preparing students academically, professionally, and spiritually to engage their field and community in God-honoring ways.
  5. Actively advancing the work of God through research, teaching, and community service.
  6. Teaching the ethical conduct of business throughout all SBM programs.

Introduction

The School of Business and Management (SBM) provides professional career preparation in accordance with the university’s Christian heritage and mission. To this end, the school has built a reputation for pragmatic and ethically based education. The curriculum blends with the liberal studies foundation provided by other schools or departments of the university.

The school encompasses diverse programs in business, management, and economics, and within these programs are multiple options for majors and minors. The school offers a Bachelor of Arts in Business Management and a Bachelor of Science in Business with six majors: accounting, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, and marketing. The B.A. degree requires students to complete the common professional component (the business core) and then select elective courses deemed most appropriate for their career objectives. The B.S. degrees require students to complete the business core and courses in an area of specialization. The school also offers a Bachelor of Arts in Economics. This B.A. degree requires the completion of the economics core and additional economics electives. 

Curriculum content in the undergraduate business program is aligned with graduate school requirements for those who wish to pursue a Master of Business Administration (MBA), Master of Business Management (MBM), or Master of Professional Accountancy (MAcc). 

Application for Upper-Division Business Courses

Admission to the School of Business and Management is required for all majors and minors in the school. Applications are available in the SBM office in Room 113 of Wilden Hall. Students are admitted each fall and spring. The program enrollment is not capped, but students are expected to demonstrate certain levels of achievement to be admitted. Typical admission to the school occurs in a student’s third semester at APU. Applications are accepted year-round. Transfer applications are due prior to course enrollment.

Current APU Students Applying for Upper-Division Courses in the School of Business and Management

Current students must meet the following requirements:

  • Priority for enrollment in upper-division business courses will be given to students who have completed 12 units of study at APU, submitted the Application for Upper-Division Business Courses, and hold a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.50.
  • Business management majors and minors must complete MATH 110 with a C- or better (or the test score equivalent). 
    • Business management majors may not switch to another SBM major (accounting, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, or marketing) without meeting the math requirement for that major (i.e., they still must complete MATH 110 with a B- or better, or the test score equivalent).
  • ALL other SBM majors and minors (accounting, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, and marketing) must complete MATH 110 with a B- or better (or the test score equivalent). 
  • Upper-division courses (ACCT, BUSI, ECON, ENTR, FIN, IBUS, MGMT, MKTG 300-499) require the Application for Upper-Division Business Courses and may not be available to students outside the school, except as required by other majors.

International Students

International students must meet the following additional requirements:

  • The admission requirement for international students with English as a second language (ESL) is a minimum TOEFL score of 600. The School of Business and Management specifies that the TOEFL Test of Written English (TWE) and TOEFL Test of Spoken English (TSE) be included in the TOEFL assessment score, since these are critical to success in business.

Transfer Students

  • Transfer applicants must make an appointment with an SBM academic advisor prior to enrolling in SBM courses.

Scholars for Business Achievement

Scholars for Business Achievement (SBA) is a dynamic student-led organization within the School of Business and Management (SBM) that strives to build student professional development at Azusa Pacific University.

SBA is dedicated to the continuing development and transformation of all business students through major incentives such as networking events, résumé-building experience, mock interviews, etiquette dinners, and community involvement. SBA bridges the gap between undergraduate students and alumni through events, featured speakers, and gatherings (social hours). SBA also seeks to guide younger business students through a peer-to-peer mentoring program. SBA provides opportunities for APU business students to thrive, become their professional best, and prepare to enter the world of work in a business environment. For more information, contact sba@apu.edu. 

Enactus

APU Enactus provides students an opportunity to confront real-world challenges by creating solutions that achieve real results for real people. A team/project-based approach is employed to allow students to obtain experience turning ideas into action, measure outcomes, and evaluate results. It allows students to develop leadership, managerial, teamwork, and communication skills that emerge from real-life experiences. Students can choose to participate in an existing project or start one, and those who participate for more than one semester commonly speak of APU Enactus as a life-changing experience. It is open to all campus majors/minors, across all class levels (freshman to graduate). For more information, visit the APU Enactus website or email apuenactus@apu.edu.

Accounting Honor Society

The Accounting Honor Society (AHS) is a student-led group within the LP and Timothy Leung School of Accounting in the School of Business and Management that focuses on career preparation for accounting majors. AHS provides numerous networking opportunities, hosting Mock Interview Night and the Meet the Firms event, conducting firm tours, and bringing professionals on campus to speak about their careers and give tips on how to excel in the accounting profession. AHS is designed to connect accounting students by building a lifelong professional and collegial network of support. AHS maintains the Leung School of Accounting’s values of character and competency to reflect the life of Christ and shine the light of Truth, which we believe results in the highest form of success. For more information, contact ahs@apu.edu.

Student Investment Fund (SIF)

The Student Investment Fund (SIF) is an exclusive group of ambitious students and faculty who seek to take learning beyond the classroom setting. They analyze, research, and invest real money in the stock market. Their portfolio is handcrafted and structured by the students with the oversight of qualified professionals. SIF is an opportunity to meet and network with like-minded individuals and industry professionals, all while creating a great résumé-building experience to establish a strong foundation for the students’ future. It also offers internship credit to help with units toward graduation. For more information, contact professor Kevin Kurimoto at kkurimoto@apu.edu.

Business Internship Experience

The business internship course (BUSI 350) augments business majors’ classroom experience and expands their focus to external career possibilities. The student is able to utilize practical real-world experience, create a plan for their career, and build their résumé prior to graduation. This class offers the opportunity for students to apply academic concepts and theories, gain firsthand business experience, and build interpersonal, networking, and professional relationships. Students reflect on how their positions fit into the value proposition of the organizations they are serving, as well as incidents and observations they identify as notable, and integrate the Christian worldview into the roles they are working in at the organizational level. 

To qualify, students must be juniors or seniors and have been accepted into the School of Business and Management. All internships must be preapproved by the department (an application is required). Students are responsible for submitting assignments and projects at the same time they are gaining experience.

School of Business and Management Study Away Programs

All business majors are encouraged to participate in the school’s summer intensive programs to Europe and China to heighten their learning and experience in global business practices.

Europe Summer Program (L’APEU)

Students travel to 8 countries in 5 weeks, visiting more than 10 international organizations like Nestlé and working with orphans for several days on a mission project with a Youth for Christ center in the Czech Republic. Take 6-9 units of business courses at the discounted summer tuition rate and tour Rome on a Vespa! The field visits range from corporate and not-for-profit encounters in the luxury, auto, health care, and household goods industries to government and financial institutions like the European Central Bank (ECB). We engage in presentations, focus groups, and tours, and visit with internationally oriented managers, executives, and APU alumni. Experience amazing food, bike tours, mountain peaks, fortresses, musical events, and more as you immerse yourself in international business and culture. Engage in peak life and learning opportunities through faith-based experiences and personal challenges that God will use to speak into your future. The program typically begins with one week of classes at the APU campus, and then it’s off to Europe to experience the world abroad! We visit England, France, Germany, Austria, Belgium, Switzerland, Italy, and the Czech Republic. For more information, visit our Facebook page or email lapeu@apu.edu. 

China Summer Program

Students spend eight weeks learning about daily life and business in China, immersed in Chinese culture while being a part of a program that is structured to challenge students and help them gain the most diverse experience possible. Students begin their time in Shanghai, where they spend the first two weeks in 1-9 units of business courses taught by professors and businesspeople. The team will also have the opportunity to learn about the Chinese language and culture, tour businesses, visit historically and culturally significant sites, and connect with APU alumni. Following this time, students depart to individual business internships at various companies across China for six weeks. These internships are found prior to the program and arranged by the student, providing important skills that will benefit them professionally. To wrap up the program, students spend the final week together in beautiful Yanghuo/Guilin, where they debrief their internships, spend time in nature, and get much-needed rest. Studying in China gives students an unprecedented edge among their peers as they enter an increasingly globalized business world. For more information, contact professor Stuart Strother at sstrother@apu.edu or professor Barbara Strother at blstrother@apu.edu.

ACCT 120, Principles of Accounting I, 4 Units

This course introduces the financial accounting model and application of fundamental accounting principles. The corporate form of business serves as the primary model to demonstrate accounting principles for cash, accounts receivable, inventories, operational assets, liabilities and stockholders' equity. Students complete a computer simulation which introduces computer application in accounting.

ACCT 121, Principles of Accounting II, 3 Units

This course introduces basic managerial accounting concepts and emphasizes the use of accounting data in decision making. Topics covered include cost accumulation models, cost behavior, break-even analysis, variable costing, budgeting, differential analysis, product pricing, capital expenditure analysis, and financial statement analysis.

Prerequisite: ACCT 120

ACCT 320, Intermediate Accounting I, 3 Units

This course offers an intensive study of the accounting theory and principles underlying financial accounting. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical and conceptual framework of the financial reporting process including the role and authority of official accounting pronouncements and the responsibilities of professional accountants. This course begins with a review of the accounting model and covers accounting theory as it relates to revenue recognition, current assets including cash, accounts receivable, inventories, and current liabilities.

Prerequisite: ACCT 120 and ACCT 121

ACCT 321, Intermediate Accounting II, 3 Units

This course continues the study begun in ACCT 225, covering operational assets, intangible assets, investments, long-term liabilities, leases, income taxes, corporate capital transactions, and statement of cash flows. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical and conceptual framework of the financial reporting process including the role and authority of official accounting pronouncements and the responsibilities of professional accountants.

Prerequisite: ACCT 225

ACCT 325, Cost Accounting, 3 Units

This course explores managerial accounting concepts used in planning and controlling operations, determining cost of production, inventory control and evaluation, budgeting, and long-range planning. Emphasis is placed on cost determination, cost accumulation, cost-volume-profit relationships, standard costs, variances analysis and reporting, and the relationship between controlling costs and controlling operations.

Prerequisite: ACCT 225, ACCT 226 and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

ACCT 331, Federal Taxes I, 3 Units

This course offers an intensive study of the theory and principles of federal income tax law as it applies to individuals. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical framework and philosophy of the federal tax system as well as practical application and planning. This course covers basic concepts in the determination of income, classes of deductions, allowable credits, and property transactions. The importance of appropriate tax planning is stressed.

Prerequisite: ACCT 120, ACCT 121 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

ACCT 332, Federal Taxes II, 3 Units

This course offers an intensive study of the theory and principles of federal income tax law as it applies to business entities - corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical framework as well as practical application and planning. This course covers basic concepts of taxation in corporate formation and operation, partnership and S corporation formation and operation, and fundamentals of estate, gift, and trust taxation. The course also covers the tax audit process and professional tax preparer responsibilities.

Prerequisite: ACCT 331 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

ACCT 336, Advanced Accounting, 3 Units

This course provides an in-depth study of accounting theory and principles. Topics include business combinations, consolidations, insolvency, foreign currency transactions, segment reporting, partnerships, fund accounting, and accounting for state and local governmental units and other non-business organizations.

Prerequisite: ACCT 225, ACCT 226 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

ACCT 426, Auditing Principles I, 3 Units

An overview of auditing concepts is offered with special attention to auditing standards, professional ethics, the legal ability inherent in the attest function, the study and evaluation of internal control, the nature of evidence, statistical sampling, and the impact of electronic data processing. The basic approach to planning an audit is addressed as are the audit objectives and procedures applied to the elements in a financial statement.

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ACCT 336 and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

ACCT 427, Auditing Principles II, 3 Units

This course takes the concepts and procedures learned in ACCT 426 and applies them in a comprehensive audit case study. Students prepare audit work papers that demonstrate application of audit theory and objectives for various classes of financial statement accounts. Students are exposed to the planning, control, and review procedures used by many public accounting firms. The use of computerized audit software is covered.

Prerequisite: ACCT 426 and acceptance into the School of Business and Management

BUSI 100, Personal Finance, 3 Units

An overview of personal financial planning offers students power over financial resources, freedom to give generously, and insight for better citizenship. The course emphasizes concepts such as goal setting, budgeting, debt management, investing, major purchases, insurance, and retirement/estate planning.

BUSI 110, Business and Entrepreneurship, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the role of business in society and the impact of the social environment on the firm. It acquaints students with the basic functional areas of business, including management, human resources, marketing, finance, and production.

BUSI 240, Introduction to Information Systems, 3 Units

This class offers a study of the fundamentals of information systems methods and equipment, computer characteristics and concepts, and elements of programming. Business applications of computers are discussed and demonstrated. A working knowledge of personal computer productivity tools such as Web browsers, Microsoft operating systems, and Microsoft Office is provided.

BUSI 296, Business Law, 3 Units

The course introduces the laws affecting business transactions. Included is an overview of the legal system as it relates to business and in-depth study of contracts, sales and commercial transactions, and secured transactions.

BUSI 311, Quantitative Analysis for Management, 3 Units

This course equips students with analytical and mathematical models for business decision making. Included are statistical analysis, project management, simulation, and linear programming.

Prerequisite: B- or better in MATH 110 and acceptance into the School of Business and Management.

BUSI 350, Business Internship, 1-3 Units

This course provides a practical application of principle and theory in an actual business setting through an internship opportunity. The student learns to set objectives and measure performance against those objectives in a business setting through a structured reporting process with the Instructor. As an alternative to the internship experience, students may be chosen to participate in Enactus, SBA (Scholars for Business Achievement) or directed research for service learning. May be taken three times for credit.

Prerequisites: Completion of 60 units, appropriate employment or approval for Enactus or SBA, and Instructor's permission. All Internships must be pre-approved by the School of Business and Management.

BUSI 370, International Business, 3 Units

This course presents a survey of issues in international business. The focus is on managing in an international environment, understanding the global monetary system, and developing an international perspective on business operations including production, marketing, finance, and human resources. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: ECON 250 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

BUSI 405, Business Report Writing, 3 Units

Students practice writing clear, well-organized, effective formal and informal reports. Evaluation and preparation of business reports, utilizing business research methods and communication techniques are emphasized. Management of data and the use of graphics also are included.

Prerequisite: SBM Acceptance

BUSI 430, Money and Banking, 3 Units

This course includes a study of monetary theories and banking principles, with special reference to contemporary developments in money and banking in the United States, the Federal Reserve System, and financial investment.

Prerequisite: ACCT120, ACCT 121, ECON 250, ECON 251 and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

BUSI 495, Writing 3: Business Ethics, 3 Units

This course focuses on the integration of Christian faith, ethical issues, and professional concerns that confront business professionals in the workplace. Students explore biblical and moral principles for ethical analysis and reflection and utilize the case method to research and write managerial responses to current ethical dilemmas in the workplace. This course fulfills the General Education Writing 3 requirement and is recommended for all business majors. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2

BUSI 496, Senior Seminar: Business Ethics, 3 Units

This course focuses on the integration of Christian faith, ethical issues and professional concerns, which confront business professionals in the workplace with particular concern for leadership and transitions. The course will explore biblical and moral principles as related to real life case studies. In addition, the course offers the student the opportunity to complete in-depth study in a business related area to further prepare them as effective participants and leaders in the workplace. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisites: Senior Standing and upper-division writing intensive course, majority of God's word, acceptance into School of Business Management.

BUSI 496H, Senior Seminar: Business Ethics - Honors, 3 Units

This course focuses on the integration of Christian faith, ethical issues and professional concerns, which confront business professionals in the workplace with particular concern for leadership and transitions. The course will explore biblical and moral principles as related to real life case studies. In addition, the course offers the student the opportunity to complete in-depth study in a business related area to further prepare them as effective participants and leaders in the workplace. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisites: Senior Standing and upper-division writing intensive course. Must also be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

BUSI 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: SBM Acceptance

BUSI 497H, Readings - Honors, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

ECON 250, Principles of Macroeconomics, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to concepts and tools of economic analysis for macroeconomics. Students study national income and economic growth, interest rates, unemployment, and government fiscal and monetary policies.

Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH 110 or MATH 151 or MATH 161

ECON 251, Principles of Microeconomics, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to concepts and tools of economic analysis for microeconomics. Students study the interactions of firms and consumers: consumer demands, firm costs, price determination under various market structures, and the role of government in a market economy.

Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH 110 or MATH 151 or MATH 161

ECON 350, Intermediate Macroeconomics, 3 Units

This course develops more complex economic models applicable to the study of such topics as economic growth; the effects of monetary policy on business cycles, prices and interest rates; government spending and debt; and the macroeconomy with trade.

Prerequisite: ECON 250; MATH 151 or MATH 161 & Acceptance into the School of Business & Management

ECON 351, Intermediate Microeconomics, 3 Units

This course expands the concepts and tools of economic analysis developed in the Principles of Microeconomics course. The course develops more in-depth models of interactions in society: consumer choice, firm decisions, perfect and imperfect competition. Issues of uncertainty and strategic interaction are addressed as well as extensions to multiple markets.

Prerequisite: ECON 251; MATH 151 or MATH 161 & acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

ECON 352, Financial Markets and Institutions, 3 Units

This course studies financial markets, instruments, and institutions. Students examine the role of depository institutions, insurance companies, and others in the process of intermediation. The structure of financial markets, recent developments in financial instruments, interest rate determination, and the regulatory environment are discussed.

Prerequisite: ECON 250 or Instructor's consent, B or higher in MATH 110, and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

ECON 353, Health Economics, 3 Units

This course examines the economics of the health care industry primarily within the United States. Students consider the production of health care, the role of markets in allocating care, insurance and the management of care and costs, and the role of government policy in accomplishing social objectives.

Prerequisite: ECON 251 and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

ECON 355, Environmental Economics, 3 Units

This course applies economic perspectives and analytical tools to the study of environmental problems. It focuses on decisions that have environmental impacts and on the economic impact of environmental policies. The effect of business activities on the environment and the effects of policy on business are of specific concern.

Prerequisite: ECON 251 and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

ECON 356, Labor Economics, 3 Units

This course examines the allocation of labor in a society among its various possible uses. Students consider the role of markets in allocating this labor, issues of market power, and the role of government policy in accomplishing social objectives. Wage determination, job search, and labor productivity are also discussed.

Prerequisite: ECON 251 and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

ECON 357, Economics of the Developing World, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the economic and social issues confronting the majority of people in the world. Students survey the current conditions of people in the developing world and build ways of understanding the complex issues that they face. Using these tools, students examine economic and financial infrastructure, political conditions, levels and trends in poverty and income distribution, job creation and economic growth, health and education, and environmental conditions which all affect the state of "development" of a people.

Prerequisite: ECON 250, ECON 251, and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

ECON 359, Urban and Regional Economics, 3 Units

This course combines the disciplines of economics and geography. Economic interactions among individuals, firms, and governmental units are analyzed geographically by focusing on central cities, suburbs, and outlying regions. Within this urban and regional context, this course places particular emphasis on market forces, land use, transportation, crime, housing, and local government.

Prerequisite: ECON 250, ECON 251, and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

ECON 371, Comparative Economics, 3 Units

Students are offered an integrated treatment of policy, institutions, business, and international trade theory within the different types of economic systems. The values that societies hold are examined as reasons for why different systems are chosen in different countries. The course studies the economics of both market economies and socialist economies, examining their domestic and international policies toward economic interactions.

Prerequisite: ECON 250 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

ECON 372, International Trade and Finance, 3 Units

Students study the theory and practice of international trade and international finance. The course addresses questions of why countries trade, what they trade, and national and global trade policies. Also, foreign exchange markets, exchange rate determination, foreign direct investment, and international capital markets are studied.

Prerequisite: ECON 250, ECON 251, and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

ECON 452, Econometrics, 3 Units

This course introduces students to econometric analysis to better understand the economic environment. Cross-sectional regression analysis and time series methods are covered, and serial correlation and heteroskedasticity are addressed. Panel data methods are introduced, as well as such topics as instrumental variables and simultaneous equation estimation.

Prerequisite: ECON 350; ECON 351 (may be taken concurrently); MATH 130 or MATH 361; Acceptance into the School of Business and Management

ECON 453, Microfinance and Microenterprise, 3 Units

Microfinance and microenterprise development are strategies for strengthening the economic opportunities of poorer households to enable families to build assets, provide income, and plan for a better future. This course examines these approaches in depth and evaluates the effectiveness of various projects at accomplishing their stated goals.

Prerequisites: ECON 250, ECON 251 and Senior Standing, and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

ECON 454, Industrial Organization and Regulation, 3 Units

This course investigates the importance of market structure for firm and consumer outcomes beyond the standard perfect competition and monopoly models. Students will learn to incorporate real world attributes into their understanding of market activity through case studies and advanced market models. Topics to be addressed include cartels, entry and exit, oligopoly, price discrimination, and research and development.

Prerequisite: ECON 351; ECON 350 (may be taken concurrently); MATH 151 or MATH 161

ECON 458, Economics and Religion, 3 Units

This course provides students an opportunity to examine the relationship between religion and economic life in terms of individuals' actions and the elements of the economic system itself. In particular, students examine the relationship between economic behavior and institutions and Islam, Confucianism, and Christianity.

Prerequisite: ECON 350; ECON 351 (may be taken concurrently); Senior Standing, and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

ECON 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This program of study concentrates on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time faculty member.

Prerequisite: SBM Acceptance

ENTR 310, Small Business Ventures, 3 Units

Students apply their leadership, problem-solving and strategy skills to consider how winning entrepreneurs think, act, perform, then establish goals to practice emulating those actions, attitudes and strategies. New Venture Creation is about the actual process of getting a new venture started, growing the venture, successfully harvesting it, and starting again.

Prerequisite: BUSI 110 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

ENTR 312, Creativity and Innovation, 3 Units

This course investigates innovation in the corporate setting and the personal creative process, with an emphasis on understanding the role innovation plays in corporate success. Students will learn and apply the practical tool-kit for accomplishing this by practicing methods for sharpening their innovative and creative skills. This will be done via lectures and personal exercises designed to build both information content and a repertoire of specific techniques.

Prerequisite: SBM Acceptance

ENTR 313, Negotiating Entrepreneurial Issues, 3 Units

Students learn the basics of negotiation, then research and explore additional techniques, which can enable them to discover and establish alternative criteria to expand and build upon their bargaining style. An assessment of the students' negotiating style, role-playing, principled negotiation and information gathering will be conducted. Emphasis will be on topics related to entrepreneurial negotiation.

Prerequisite: SBM Acceptance

ENTR 314, Entrepreneurial Management, 3 Units

Students apply their creative and innovative talents while sharpening their analytical abilities. Students will develop a new business idea and craft it into a comprehensive business plan that details the qualitative (e.g. business modeling and milestone planning) and quantitative (financial forecasts and valuation) process of bringing a new venture idea to fruition. The business plan that each team develops is an operating plan for a start-up company or a new venture within a larger corporation.

Prerequisite: ENTR 310 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

ENTR 315, Social Entrepreneurship, 3 Units

Social entrepreneurship is an emerging and rapidly changing field dedicated to the starting and growing of social mission-driven ventures - organizations that strive to advance social change through innovative solutions. This course exposes students to viable business models in social enterprise, focusing on the ideas, process, steps, and strategies required for creating new social ventures. Through lectures, case studies, and classroom dialogue, students will learn to think strategically and to act opportunistically with balanced social and financial perspective.

Prerequisite: BUSI 110 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

ENTR 320, Entrepreneurship and Innovation Practicum, 3 Units

This course enables students to gain practical experience two ways: (1) guest speakers and company visits, and (2) work in an entrepreneurial or innovative organization and translate those experiences into academic learning. With close guidance of practicum faculty, students will identify and work with a business, public, or nonprofit organization. Working individually or in small teams, students will complete a defined project of approximately 100 hours that has both practical value and academic rigor. Students will provide regular status reports and receive faculty coaching during the practicum.

Prerequisite: Senior standing and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

FIN 300, Business Finance for Managers, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to concepts and tools of business finance for managers. Students study financial statements and their interpretation, business performance measures, the management of cash and the short term financial needs of the organization, and how to make good capital budgeting decisions. Credit is not given for both FIN 300 and FIN 320. FIN 300 does not satisfy the prerequisites of any course requiring FIN 320 as a prerequisite.

Prerequisite: ACCT 120, Business Management Majors only, & Acceptance into SBM

FIN 320, Principles of Corporate Finance, 3 Units

Students explore the principles and practices of financial management. Sources and methods of raising capital, allocation of funds within the firm, cash flow and financial statement analysis, financial markets, and capital budgeting techniques are addressed. Additional concepts covered include present-value analysis, long-term financial planning, risk and return, and basic derivatives.

Prerequisite: ACCT 120, BUSI 311 or ECON 351 or MATH 151 or MATH 161, and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

FIN 330, Financial Analysis, 3 Units

This course prepares students with the necessary tools of financial statement analysis for business valuation and strategic considerations. The course develops the ideas of ratio analysis and time value of money in discounted cash flows in order to analyze the financial conditions of a business organization. The course also covers credit analysis and corporate finance issues such as merger and acquisition and debt financing. Case studies are used extensively.

Prerequisite: ACCT 121, BUSI 330, MATH 151 or MATH 161 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

FIN 331, Managerial Finance, 3 Units

This course extends the concepts and methodologies introduced in Principles of Finance to incorporate the practical uses as a manager in an organization. The course places emphasis on managerial decisions using spreadsheet applications. Topics include: financial statement analysis, project analysis, long-term financial planning, risk and return, and basic derivatives.

Prerequisite: FIN 320 or Instructor's consent, and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

FIN 432, Investment Analysis, 3 Units

This course introduces the student to the basic tools of investment analysis and integrates these with the actual operations of investments and portfolio construction. The emphasis is on providing analyses of asset selection with an experience of real market activities.

Prerequisite: BUSI 330, MATH 151 or MATH 161, ECON 352 (may be taken concurrently) or Instructor's consent, and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

FIN 434, Derivatives, 3 Units

This course prepares students with a basic understanding of derivatives of financial assets and commodities (such as futures, options, swaps, etc.). Pricing of these derivatives and their function in hedging and speculation is discussed. Recent innovations of pricing models for instruments such as interest rate derivatives, exotic options, and assessment of market risk based on the market prices of derivatives are also covered.

Prerequisite: FIN 432, MATH 151 or MATH 161, MATH 130 or PSYC 299 or Instructor's consent, and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

FIN 436, Financial Risk Management, 3 Units

The course provides students with the theory and management tools of risk management and financial innovation, using different combinations of financial assets and derivatives to immunize the organization's market risk. Topics include dynamic hedging using derivatives such as futures and options, and possibly the development of new products (or combinations) to protect the business or portfolio from the exposure to financial risk.

Prerequisite: FIN 434 and MATH 151 or MATH 161, or Instructor's consent, and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

FIN 439, Seminar in Finance, 3 Units

This course covers case studies in corporate finance, such as corporate strategy and structure, capital structure and payout policy, raising capital, corporate restructuring, and corporate governance. The course provides students with an understanding of the strategic issues of corporate financial management. In particular, advanced topics such as assessment and analysis of market volatility, evolution of financial structures, and strategies are also covered.

Prerequisites: FIN 330, FIN 432 or Instructor's consent, and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

IBUS 374, Topics in International Management and Strategy, 3 Units

Students analyze operational management issues encountered in international and culturally diverse enterprises. The course focuses upon human resource management, production management, cross-cultural issues, and strategic planning and implication to the firm. A series of cases and a corporate analysis project are utilized. This course may be taken on campus or in the IBI study abroad program.

Prerequisite: BUSI 210, ECON 250, ECON 251, and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

IBUS 479, Import/Export Practicum, 3 Units

In this project-based class, students gain practical knowledge of the business of imports and exports. Students are expected to start a one-semester small business importing a product from abroad and selling it domestically. Key assignments may include a market analysis, sourcing analysis, business plan, importing a sample, and selling the sample. Students have freedom of scope and scale when deciding which product(s) should comprise the project.

Prerequisite: BUSI 370 or Instructor's consent

MGMT 210, Principles of Management, 3 Units

Elements of planning, organizing, leading, and control are covered. Particular emphasis is given to organizing and actuating responsibility and authority, delegation, decentralization, the role of staff, line-staff relationship committees, board of directors, organization charting, formal and informal organization, communication, and reaction to change.

MGMT 312, Managing Teams and Groups, 3 Units

This course introduces students to essential theories and concepts for analyzing, understanding, and managing groups and teams in the workplace. The course examines components that comprise teams, helps students develop skills in diagnosing opportunities and threats that face teams, and enhances teamwork expertise. Significant time is spent exploring interpersonal processes, conflict resolution, and characteristics that influence the effectiveness of a team. This course also provides an understanding of principles and processes necessary for leading teams effectively in a wide variety of situations.

Prerequisite: MGMT 210

MGMT 335, Real Estate Management, 3 Units

This course offers an introduction to real estate principles and practices, essential real estate law, practices incidental to ownership, real estate brokerage, and property evaluation.

MGMT 410, Production Management, 3 Units

The curriculum focuses on decision making and controlling the allocations of personnel, materials, and machine utilization in a manufacturing environment. Handling and control of materials, inventory, purchasing, and quality control are addressed. Students also learn about setting standards and developing skills in estimating, forecasting, and scheduling.

Prerequisite: MGMT 210 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

MGMT 445, Human Resource Management, 3 Units

Students study the human factors in modern business as they are influenced by and effect labor-management interactions, personnel relations, techniques, and procedures.

Prerequisite: MGMT 210 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

MGMT 448, Organization and Administrative Behavior, 3 Units

This course deals with policies and practices in the management of human resources. Major organizational behavior theories are discussed in a role-playing, seminar environment.

Prerequisite: MGMT 210 and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

MGMT 450, Strategic Management, 3 Units

This course focuses on fundamental decisions in the life of a business. What is the business, and what should it be? What are the objectives? How are priorities set? How are strategic, long-range decisions to be handled? To grow or not to grow -- and what is the right size?

Prerequisite: MGMT 210; FIN 300 or BUSI 330; Senior Status, and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

MKTG 260, Principles of Marketing, 3 Units

The movement of goods from producers to consumers is analyzed in this course, which includes discussion of the channels of distribution, marketing functions, management considerations, and problems in marketing practice. Marketing trends in current economic systems are reviewed.

MKTG 350, Marketing Internship, 1-3 Units

This course integrates marketing principles and theory into a working environment relating to marketing. Includes research, setting objectives, general marketing decision making and reflection.

Prerequisites: MKTG 260, junior or senior standing, and acceptance into the School of Business Management. All internships must be pre-approved by the School of Business Management.

MKTG 361, Integrated Marketing Communications, 3 Units

The marketing communication function is introduced. Topics include advertising theory and measurement, communication theory, promotional strategies, the IMC mix, public relations and publicity, consumer education, creative strategy, and promotional ethics.

Prerequisites: MKTG 260, and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

MKTG 362, Consumer Behavior, 3 Units

This course offers comprehensive examination of the nature of markets and the factors influencing market development and change. Students study individual consumer's behavior in relation to the buying-selling process. Emphasis is placed on understanding the consumer in order to facilitate the development of an effective marketing strategy.

MKTG 363, Marketing Research, 3 Units

This course is an overview and practical application of contemporary methods for gathering, analyzing, and preparing market research for use in management decision making. Research methodology includes specific topic areas as the research process, primary and secondary data, qualitative and quantitative research methods, statistical analysis, and utilization of technology.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260, MATH 130 and acceptance into the School of Business Management

MKTG 364, Sales and Sales Management, 3 Units

In this course, consideration is given to personal sales strategies and practices, including relationship management, negotiation, consultative selling, and key account management. The sales management function, including recruiting and selecting salespeople, motivation and training, compensation plans and quotas, supervising, sales forecasting and budgeting, salesforce evaluation, and the ethics in selling and sales management is covered.

Prerequisites: MKTG 260 or Instructor's consent and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

MKTG 368, Retail Management, 3 Units

Students learn the principles of retail marketing of products and services. The course emphasizes the unique issues and problems of store managers, merchandising executives, and service company managers. Location, sales promotion, organization, human resources management, procurement, inventory, product mix and profitability, traditional and online retail methods are considered.

Prerequisites: MKTG 260, and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

MKTG 369, Global Industrial Marketing, 3 Units

Students learn the marketing of business goods by manufacturers to other businesses, government agencies, and social institutions. The course consists of market analysis, sales forecasting, product strategy, effective use of sales force, and industrial promotional planning and implementation. Extensive quantitative techniques are utilized.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260, MKTG 362, MKTG 363 and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

MKTG 373, Global Marketing Management, 3 Units

This course is an overview of international marketing and considers the powerful economic, technological, industrial, political, and demographic forces that are converging to build the foundation of a global marketplace in a dynamic and ever-changing world. Projects involving international marketing are conducted. May be taken on campus or in the IBI study abroad program.

Prerequisite: MKTG 260, BUSI 370, and acceptance into the School of Business & Management.

MKTG 465, Strategic Marketing Management, 3 Units

This course offers a strategic approach to the management of the marketing function. As the capstone course for marketing majors, students utilize marketing case analysis to examine and evaluate the entire marketing decision-making process. Course content focuses on the strategic analysis of market opportunities and the development of the marketing mix through project coursework.

Prerequisites: MKTG 260, MKTG 361, MKTG 362, and acceptance into the School of Business Management

MKTG 466, Digital Marketing, 3 Units

Within an organization's strategic and business objectives, digital marketing leverages traditional marketing, utilizing essential digital marketing tools such as online branding, display advertising, social media marketing and Search Engine Optimization. Course content will emphasize the development of digital marketing strategies and programs for an organization.

Prerequisites: MKTG 260, and acceptance into the School of Business Management.

Faculty

Dean

Robert H. Roller, Ph.D.

Associate Deans

Alan Burns, JD, Ph.D.

Ron Jewe, Ph.D.

Chair, Leung School of Accounting

John M. Thornton, Ph.D., CPA

Chair, Department of Economics, Finance, and International Business

Roger Conover, Ph.D.

Chair, Department of Management

Roxanne Helm-Stevens, DBA

Chair, Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship

Patricia Skalnik, DBA

Director of Research and Faculty Development

Dan Kipley, DBA

Director of Faith Integration, Assessment, and Accreditation

Julia Underwood, Ph.D.

Professors

Roger Conover, Ph.D.

Roxanne Helm-Stevens, DBA

Ron Jewe, Ph.D.

George Babbes, Ph.D.

Jau-Lian Jeng, Ph.D.

Dan Kipley, DBA

Daniel Park, Ph.D.

Stuart Strother, Ph.D.

Julia Underwood, Ph.D.

Robert H. Roller, Ph.D.

Associate Professors

Patricia Skalnik, DBA

Stanley Deal, M.S., CPA

Paul Anderson, CPA, MBA

Thomas Buckles, Ph.D.

Thomas Cairns, DBA

Assistant Professors

Rachel Sharpe Bodell, M.Sc.

Lanelle Chase, MBA

William Ingersoll, Ph.D.

Rachel Mabiala, MBA, CPA

Barbara Strother, MBA

Stephanie Geter, CPA, CFE, MBA

Adjunct Faculty

Robert Baker, Ph.D.

Jake Baloian, MBA

Jeff Birch, MBA

David Bixby, Ed.D.

Michelle Browning, Ph.D.

David Colachico, Ph.D.

Mark Dickerson, Ph.D., JD

Cory Ellenson, JD

Steven Gabriel, DBA

Edward Garcia, M.S.

Richard Givens, M.Div.

Cloyd Havens, JD

James Howe, MBA

Linda Hunt, M.A.

Sean Jasso, Ph.D.

Ronald Kelleher, M.A.

Kevin Kurimoto, M.S.

Si Sing Leung, Ph.D.

Frank Markow, Ph.D.

Wade McNair, Psy.D.

David Medina, MBA

Linda Neuenburg, MBA

Janice Orlando, MBA

Cindy Richmond Peck, M.A.

Laura Pohopien, Ed.D.

Laurie Reinhart, M.A.

Christine Reyes, M.A.

John Selbak, JD

Jorge Silva, MBA

Carlos Mayen Solorzano, Ph.D.

Jon Wallace, DBA