Department of Social Work

Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Overview

In the undergraduate social work program, we teach the specialized skills needed to help diverse populations, utilizing a variety of interventions and resources. Social workers provide one-on-one counseling, intervene with families, lead groups, and facilitate change in communities and the social environment. The profession of social work promotes social and economic justice for all people through advocacy and organizational and political change processes. In their courses, BSW students learn the knowledge, values, and skills to help them engage, assess, and provide intervention in their direct practice with individuals, group, families, and communities. Additionally, students are encouraged to think critically, become aware of their affective reactions, exercise good judgement, and use self-reflection as part of their professional development. During their senior year, students complete a supervised 400-hour internship at a community-based agency where they apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to professional environments and client groups to gain experience.

Career Opportunities

Social workers provide services to individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers can apply their training and experience in a variety of settings and careers, including:

   
Addictions Prevention and Treatment Hospice and Palliative Care
Adoption and Foster CareHousing Assistance
Advocacy Consulting and PlanningIn-home Services
Charter/Alternative School ProgramsInternational Social Work
Child Abuse and NeglectLaw/Courts/Community
Child Welfare ServicesMedical Social Work
Criminal JusticeMental Health Counseling
Crisis InterventionMilitary Social Work
Community Mental HealthParent Education
Community Planning and AdvocacyPolice Work
Delinquent/At-risk YouthPolitical Planning and Lobbying
Developmental DisabilitiesPrivate Clinical Practice
Disaster ReliefPrisons and Probation
Eating DisordersPublic Health
Employee Assistance ProgramsRural/Tribal Social Work
Genetics/TransplantSchool Social Work
Gerontology/Older Adult ServicesSkilled Nursing Social Work
Homeless Individual/Families Assistance

Program Mission

The undergraduate social work program at Azusa Pacific University seeks to develop competent, generalist social work practitioners who can apply knowledge, values, and skills of social work, integrating a Christian perspective in order to enhance the well-being of diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities, advancing social justice both locally and globally.

Program Values

The undergraduate social work program is grounded in the profession’s history and commitment to social justice and diversity, and in the university’s commitment to advancing God’s work in the world by being of service, advancing human rights, and providing academic excellence. The program is committed to excellence in its teaching and scholarship based on scientific inquiry, to the integration of Christian faith in learning and practice, and to the facilitation of community within the department, with students, and within the greater environment.

Introduction

Social workers help people overcome some of life’s most difficult challenges: poverty, discrimination, abuse, addiction, physical illness, divorce, loss, unemployment, educational problems, disability, and mental illness. Social workers counsel individuals and families in times of crises and stress. In addition, they work to develop organizations and communities, both locally and internationally, in order to assist people in coping more effectively with the stresses of everyday life.

The undergraduate program in professional social work maintains the following goals:

  1. To prepare students for professional social work practice with diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities, both locally and globally.
  2. To provide knowledge based on scientific inquiry built on a liberal arts foundation of human behavior and the interaction of person and environment.
  3. To prepare students for lifelong learning, critical thinking, and advanced study.
  4. To equip students to collaborate with the community to advocate for the development of policies, resources, and programs that seek to advance human well-being, promote social and economic justice, empower clients, and respect diversity.
  5. To educate students regarding the values and ethics of the profession, and the integration of Christian values throughout their practice.
  6. To engage in ongoing scholarship reflecting the goals and needs of professional social work practice.

Accreditation

The undergraduate program in the Department of Social Work has been nationally accredited since 1982 by the Council on Social Work Education.

Program Competencies/Learning Outcomes

Students will demonstrate these competencies (CSWE, 2015):

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities f the profession. Social works also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice. Social workers:

  • make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulation, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context;

  • use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations;

  • demonstrates professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication;

  • use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes; and

  • use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a cultures’ structures and values, including, social, economic, political, and culture exclusions, may recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate or create privilege and power. Social workers:

  • apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping the experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels;
  • present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences; and

  • apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, and adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies deigned to eliminate oppressive, environmental, economic, social and cultural human rights are protected. Social workers:

  • apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels; and
  • engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 4: Engage in Practice-Informed Research and Research-Informed Practice

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multi disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the process for translating research:

  • use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry ad research;
  • apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative research methods and research findings; and

  • use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy, and service delivery.

Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structure of social policies and services, the role of policy in service deliver, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice in practice settings at micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation. Social workers:

  • identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services;

  • assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services; and

  • apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilities engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective may impact their ability to effectively engage with diverse clients and constituencies. Social workers value principles of relationship-building and inter-professional collaboration to facilitate engagement with clients, constituencies and other professional as appropriate. Social workers:

  • apply knowledge to human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies; and
  • use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision making. Social workers:

  • collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies;
  • apply knowledgeable of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies;

  • develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients ad constituencies; and
  • select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence-informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment , and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing, and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration. Social workers:

  • critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies;

  • apply knowledgeable of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the interventions with clients and constituencies;

  • use interprofessional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes; and

  • facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals.

Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness. Social workers:

  • select and use appropriate method for evaluation of outcomes;
  • apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluations of outcomes;
  • critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes; and
  • apply evaluation findings to improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

Competency 10: Critically Analyze How Christian Beliefs and Values Can be Ethically Integrated in Professional Social Work Practice

Social workers understand the role of spirituality and faith as part of a holistic approach to social practice and in understanding human behavior and the social environment. Social workers apply ethical principles in the integration of faith in practice, mindful of their own beliefs and impact on the helping relationship. Social workers recognize that faith communities are part of the cultural context of individuals, families, and communities, and provide protective as well as risk factors in the process of change. In this context, social workers articulate how Christian beliefs and values can be ethically integrated in professional social work practice. They:

  • demonstrate self-awareness of their own worldview, as it relates to a Christian worldview;
  • articulate how a Christian worldview is integrated into social work practice; and
  • critically analyze how Christian, spiritual, or religious traditions assist or hinder the helping process.

During their senior year, social work majors complete a 400-hour field internship in one of several approved agencies in the community. This provides a setting for the development of practice skills in social work and an opportunity for students to integrate classroom learning with practice. Students are required to purchase professional liability insurance prior to entering into the field internship. Details on how to purchase insurance are available from the department. The director of field education discusses the application process with students in their junior year. No credit is given for life experience or for previous or current work experience. Students must complete the internship as part of their degree requirements.

Advising and Admission

Advising

Any student interested in social work is encouraged to speak with a faculty advisor in the BSW program for more information about the major. Students who wish to major in social work should declare social work interest as their intended major as soon as possible through One Stop | Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center in order to begin academic and professional planning. Upon declaring social work interest as a major, students are assigned a faculty advisor who works with them for the duration of their studies (upon full admission to the program, students will be switched from social work interest to social work by One Stop | Undergraduate Registrar). Advisors will be assigned by the program, based on availability of faculty. The role of the faculty advisor is to help students develop a multiyear academic plan, mentor them in their professional development, and be their liaison during the admissions process. While the faculty advisor is the primary contact person within the program, students are encouraged to also meet with other faculty as needed as part of their professional development. Prior to registration each semester, the program requires students to meet with their advisor.

Procedure

  1. Schedule an appointment, if necessary, to discuss social work as a choice of major.
  2. Declare “Social Work Interest” as a major through One Stop | Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center.
  3. Contact the BSW office to receive your advisor assignment and the BSW Student Handbook.
  4. Read the BSW Student Handbook in its entirety.
  5. Meet with your advisor to develop a multiyear academic plan and confirm choice of major.
  6. Meet with your advisor for academic advising prior to registration each semester.
  7. Attend advising meeting with a completed plan of proposed courses.

Note: Advisors assist in planning, but students are responsible to come prepared for advising and be knowledgeable regarding university requirements.

Admission to the Program

Students are considered “social work interest” by the registrar until formally accepted into the program. Prior to formal acceptance into the program, students should begin advising within the BSW program and can begin taking entry-level social work courses and the General Education courses that apply to social work, as outlined in the university catalog.

Entry-level Courses 1
SOCW 250Introduction to Social Work3
SOCW 251Social Welfare Policy and Service3
SOCW 310Human Behavior and the Social Environment I3
SOCW 311Human Behavior and the Social Environment II3
1

Students must submit a formal application to the BSW program and be accepted to the major prior to taking social work practice courses.

The Department of Social Work reviews applications in the spring semester only. Students currently at the university who have completed or are enrolled in SOCW 250 can apply for priority admission—the deadline for applications is March 7. As a sophomore, early admittance allows students to enroll in SOCW 332 during spring academic enrollment. Students transferring to the social work major as juniors (both current and transfer students) who miss the priority deadline must apply to the social work program by April 7. Late applications may be considered on a case-by-case basis depending on the number of accepted students.

Students may be admitted fully, on provisional status, or denied admission. If a student is admitted on provisional status, a plan for attaining full admission will be provided by the committee. If this plan is not met in full, the student will not be allowed to continue in the program. If denied admission, the student may initiate an appeal procedure, as outlined in the BSW Student Handbook.

Transfer Students

Transfer social work applicants planning to enter APU at the junior level only must submit social work application materials in order to be considered for full acceptance into the social work program. Students will receive a link to the social work application from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions upon submission of their university application. The social work application will be forwarded to the department for consideration upon acceptance to the university.

Students transferring in prior to their junior year will begin the major as social work interest, and submit applications prior to their junior year.

Current APU Students

Current APU students submit their application directly to the Department of Social Work. Applications can be obtained, but not submitted, online. Application forms are also available in the BSW office; call (626) 857-2410. Applications will be reviewed by a committee comprising social work faculty, and considered based on academic and personal readiness for the program.

Admission Requirements

  1. Completion of the Introduction to Social Work course with a C or better (for priority admission only)
  2. A 2.5 overall GPA
  3. Completion of all application requirements
  4. Personal and professional aptitude
  5. Personal statements should be three to four pages long, and include:
    1. When and how you became interested in the field of social work.
    2. What influenced you in the choice of social work as a profession.
    3. Your career goals or beginning thoughts on your areas of interest.
    4. Discussion of what you see to be personal strengths that will help you in your development of professional skills and knowledge. If you have taken the Strengths Finder Inventory as part of your Beginnings course, please note your strengths and how these strengths may contribute to the practice of social work.
    5. Personal attributes you would like to further develop as part of your participation in the social work program.
    6. Any life experiences you believe will contribute to or impede your progress in this program.
    7. How your personal faith, beliefs, and values have influenced/will influence your career as a social worker.

Criteria for evaluation of autobiographical statements:

  1. Writing skills
  2. Indication of genuine interest in enhancing human well-being and advancing social justice
  3. Thoughtful reflection of personal characteristics and insight regarding experiences that indicate the student is ready to successfully complete program requirements
  4. Provide evidence of participation in volunteer, leadership, or work experience relevant to the practice of social work (participation in service-learning, ministry experiences, personal therapy, Club Social Work, or the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) offers good opportunities for experience).

Procedure

  1. Complete or be enrolled in the Introduction to Social Work course, completing with a C or better for priority admission.
  2. Complete all sections of the application.
  3. Complete a personal statement.
  4. Submit an unofficial APU transcript, or transcript of work taken elsewhere if you are a transfer.
  5. Submit completed packet to the department for review by March 7 for priority admission. Students missing the priority date, submit by April 7. Transfer students apply through admissions.
  6. Students will be notified in writing within three weeks of the SOCW Advising and Admissions Committee’s decision.

Admissions Appeals Process

Any student who is dissatisfied with a decision for admission may request an in-person review with the admissions committee, in which they can supply further verbal and written evidence in regards to the actions taken by the committee. The committee will provide a written response to the student within one week of the hearing. If the student is still in disagreement, he/she may appeal to the associate dean of the School of Behavioral and Applied Sciences.

Major in:

Social Work (BSW)

SOCW 250, Introduction to Social Work, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the social work profession, social welfare system, and policies in the United States. The course examines the requirements for social work practice, articulates the identity of the profession, and discovers the various settings of social work practice. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

SOCW 251, Social Welfare Policy and Service, 3 Units

This course examines social welfare policies and programs developed to meet human needs in American society. The course explores diversity of political, cultural, historical, economic, and ideological influences on social welfare policy. The course explores how critical thinking advances social and economic justice and delivery of effective social work services.

SOCW 275, Social Justice Foundations for Human Rights, 3 Units

The Social Justice Foundations in Human Rights course will examine assumptions and biases in regards to race, age, social class, religion, gender, sexual orientation and ability. This course will evaluate causes of community concern in the areas of civil rights, immigration, poverty, human trafficking, disabilities and war. It will review issues of oppression and discrimination. This course will have students gain insight and self-awareness in their interactions with individuals of from different cultural backgrounds. Students will practice developing action plans to promote social justice in targeted groups. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

SOCW 310, Human Behavior and the Social Environment I, 3 Units

This course is a study from a multi-theoretical perspective of the interaction of cultural, biological, psychological, social, spiritual, and environmental reciprocal interactions. This course focuses on human development from birth through adolescence. The knowledge of human behavior and the social environment will be applied utilizing bio-psycho-social-spiritual frameworks to guide the process of assessment, intervention, and evaluation.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, recommended SOC 120 and PSYC 110

SOCW 311, Human Behavior and the Social Environment II, 3 Units

This course is a study from a multi-dimensional perspective of the interaction of cultural, biological, psychological, social, spiritual, and environmental influences that promote or deter the development of individuals from young adulthood through old age and death. This course builds upon the material presented in HBSE I, and further explores theoretical models for understanding and assessing macro systems.

Prerequisite: SOCW 310 and Sophomore standing.

SOCW 332, Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-semester, three-course practice sequence wherein the student will identify professional generalist social work practice behaviors. The course will develop the student's ability to think critically and apply social work ethical principles to guide practice. The course uses evidence-based practice methods in practice which engage, assess, intervenes, and evaluates individuals and families.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisites: Application and acceptance into the social work major

SOCW 333, Social Work Practice with Communities and Organizations, 3 Units

Social Work Practice with Communities and Organizations is another course in the generalist social work practice sequence. The Course will focus on macro social work practice, community organizing, and development. The course will provide students with the knowledge and skills needed for ever-changing contexts and the social service delivery systems used to respond to such contexts.

Prerequisite: SOCW 250, SOCW 332

SOCW 335, Community Transformation, 6 Units

This course offers a formal and experiential study of the transformation of urban, multicultural communities with the goal of developing a service ethic through a semester-long internship. Involves directed reading, reflective papers, a service practicum, and group discussions-- aimed at both the transformation of the student community and the wider L.A. community. Course is available only through the L.A. Term Program.

SOCW 350, Aging: Implications for Policy and Practice, 3 Units

This course offers an introduction to social work practice with older adults with attention given to current research, policies, and problems faced by the elderly, and the impact of the older adult population on society. Resources, programs, and services which focus on the well-being for the older adult population will be introduced.

Prerequisite: SOCW 251 or Instructor's consent

SOCW 351, Child Welfare, 3 Units

Students explore programs and policies that have been developed to meet the well-being of children and families. The issues affecting these programs and policies are studied to determine how policy impacts the delivery of child welfare programs.

Prerequisite: SOCW 250, SOCW 251 or Instructor's consent

SOCW 360, Soc Work Practice with Groups, 3 Units

Social Work Practice with Groups is another course in the generalist social work practice sequence. This course introduces students to utilize group theories and leadership skills in social work practice. Students will demonstrate mezzo practice knowledge and skills by identifying, analyzing, and implementing evidence-based interventions designed to achieve client goals.

Prerequisite: SOCW 250, SOCW 332

SOCW 380, Understanding International Social Problems and Services through Study Abroad, 3 Units

This course teaches about social problems and services in international settings with a focus on social welfare systems in a particular country other than the United States. Countries such as China, England, Kenya, Russia, or Mexico may be chosen for study. It is taught as a May-term course. For one week students read a text on international social work practice and materials about social problems and services in the country to be visited. For the remaining 10 days to 2 weeks students have an experiential learning experience in the country itself and a time of debriefing the experience at APU. The accent is on a global perspective of social welfare, enriching cultural experiences and a comparison of domestic and international methods of addressing human needs and social policies and programs.

Prerequisite: SOCW 250 or Instructor's consent

SOCW 400, Grant and Proposal Writing, 3 Units

Grant and proposal development continue to be an activity in the operations of human service agencies. Agencies must assess the need for services, determine their priorities, and develop strategies for funding their programs. Today, grants and proposals serve as primary means by which many agencies receive resources. This course is aimed at creating an understanding of the process and tools needed for translating a desire to respond to human need and problems into a realistic plan of action. It acquaints students with program design and planning techniques, which consider client/consumer group characteristics. The course culminates in the student's development of a human service program proposal aimed at responding to a need or problem.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing or Instructor's consent

SOCW 410, Family Violence, 3 Units

Family violence is an in-depth study from a system's perspective of violence that occurs in families. This course provides an overview of child abuse, spousal abuse, abuse between intimate partners, and elder abuse. The course explores the theory and research as to the causes of abuse, including individual and family factors, elder abuse, gender issues, community and societal influences, and cultural factors. This course explores the policy and programs developed to deal with these crises. Finally, methods of assessment and intervention are investigated as applicable to both professional and personal situations.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing or Instructor's consent

SOCW 415, Addictions: Assessment and Intervention, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of addictions from a bio-psycho-social-spiritual-cultural perspective. Unique issues relative to children, adolescents, women, people with disabilities, people who are gay/lesbian, the elderly, and minorities are explored. The course focuses on a review of various types of addictions; theory on the etiology and process of addiction and its treatment; information on assessment, referral, and treatment resources; and exploration of the historical and current responses to addictions in the community as well as in the church.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing or Instructor's consent

SOCW 420, Suffering: Theological and Practical Perspectives on Disabilities, 3 Units

This course examines theological perspectives to understand the role of suffering in the human experience. Focusing on persons with disabilities, students explore their personal values, gain understanding of bio-psycho-social-spiritual components of disability, access available resources, and develop strategies to help churches/agencies develop inclusive programs.

Prerequisite: 3 units of UBBL Junior Standing

SOCW 425, Introduction to International Development, 3 Units

This course provides students with an opportunity to consider the theories and "on the ground" issues concerning international development. In addition, because non-governmental organizations are the primary organisms through which international development is conducted, students will familiarize themselves with the strengths and limitations these organisms bring to the development process.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

SOCW 430, Introduction to Nonprofit Management, 3 Units

Students go out into the world and work for nonprofit organizations. The goals of the course are to enrich student perspective regarding nonprofits, to give them opportunity to apply their knowledge to the analysis of nonprofit managerial situations and to provide them with an understanding of the opportunities and power of nonprofit management.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

SOCW 466, Field Internship I, 4 Units

This social work practicum provides a setting for the development of practice skills and an opportunity for the integration of knowledge, skills, and values in social work. Students complete a minimum of 400 hours in an approved agency.Prerequisities: SOCW 310, SOCW 311, SOCW 333 or SOCW 335, SOCW 360,

Corequisite: SOCW 467

SOCW 467, Senior Practicum Seminar I, 3 Units

This seminar course integrates the generalist practice knowledge and skills of a social work professional. Students will learn how to identify and conduct themselves as a professional social worker in their respective internship contexts. Evidence-based practice skills will be developed to help students engage in research-informed practice and learn how practice shapes research. This the first semester of a two-semester course sequence.

Prerequisites: SOCW 310 (C grade or above), SOCW 311 (C grade or above), SOCW 333 or SOCW 335, SOCW 360. Corequisite SOCW 466

SOCW 468, Field Internship II, 4 Units

This social work practicum provides a setting for the development of practice skills and an opportunity for the integration of knowledge, skills, and values in social work. Students complete a minimum of 400 hours in an approved agency.

Prerequisites: SOCW 466, SOCW 467

Corequisites: SOCW 469

SOCW 469, Senior Practicum Seminar II, 3 Units

This final Social Work Seminar will focus on integration of learning and practice in preparation for beginning generalist social work practice for students currently in field placement. Students will identify, critique, and apply evidence based practice models in field practice. Emphasis will be placed on practice skills of engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation according to the NASW Code of Ethics.

Prerequisites: SOCW 310 HBSE I (C grade or above), SOCW 311 HBSE II (C grade or above), SOCW 333 or SOCW 335, SOCW 360, SOCW 466

SOCW 478, Social Work Research Methods, 3 Units

This course prepares students for evidence-informed practice and research by introducing a range of social science research methods, skills in research evaluation and critique, and development of a social science research proposal informed by their field internship practice experience.

Prerequisite: MATH 130.

Corequisites: SOCW 466, SOCW 467

SOCW 479, Social Work Research Project, 3 Units

This course prepares students for evidence-informed practice and research by conducting an empirical study based on the research proposal completed in the Social Work Research Methods course. Students learn to apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgment through the process of data collection, data analysis, and writing a research report. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: MATH 130, SOCW 478;

corequisites: SOCW 468, SOCW 469

SOCW 496, Senior Seminar: Ethics in the Helping Professions, 3 Units

This course facilitates the integration of Christian faith and values with careers in the helping profession. This is accomplished through examining religious and spiritual experiences, as well as ethical dilemmas often confronted by social workers, nurses, counselors, and others in the helping profession, as they exist within the context of one's cultural, social, and physical environment. Attention is given to the process of faith development, historical perspectives, and the diversity of spiritual experiences. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, completion of the majority of the units required for God's Word and the Christian Response, and upper-division writing intensive course.

SOCW 497, Readings in Social Work, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussion, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

SOCW 499, Special Topics, 1-6 Units

Special topics courses offer undergraduate-level content that will augment the set social work curriculum. These courses include a wide range of specialized topics relevant to professional social workers. The unit value of these courses range from one to six unit credits, depending upon the specific contact hours and course workload.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing; Acceptance into the Social Work program

Faculty

Chair

Mary Rawlings, Ph.D., LCSW

Professor

Mary Rawlings, Ph.D., LCSW

BSW Program Director

Barbara Johnson, MSW, LCSW

Assistant Professors

Emily Blackmer, MSW

Amy Tauati, MSW

Anupama Jacob, Ph.D.

Helen Nazarian, MSW, LCSW

Lynn Raine, MSW, LCSW

Adjunct Faculty

Catherine Fisher, MSW, LCSW

Martin Hernandez, MSW, LCSW

Patrick Riley, M.A.