Department of Kinesiology

The Department of Kinesiology offers a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology, with concentrations in health professions, applied exercise science, and physical education. It also offers undergraduate minors in athletic coaching and adaptive physical activity, and a concentration in physical education for the liberal studies major (see Liberal Studies/Undergraduate Education K-8 program for specific requirements). The department equips students who are academically engaged, relationally centered, vocationally aware, and wellness oriented using approaches that are discipline based and grounded within a Christian worldview.

 

AES 475, Current Topics in Exercise Science, 2 Units

This course explores current topics in exercise science. This seminar-style course will discuss topics related to health, wellness, fitness, and human performance. Possible topics include ergogenic aids in sport, advanced sports nutrition, exercise adaptations for various populations, advanced modalities in exercise prescription, and advanced corrective exercise strategies.

Prerequisites: AT 355, AES 360, AES 363, and AES 364

AES 492, Practicum in Strength, Conditioning, and Human Performance, 2 Units

This upper-division applied exercise science course helps students apply their knowledge, skills, and abilities in a practical setting. Students use a scientific and integrated approach to the assessment, development, implementation, and management of strengthening, conditioning, and human performance programs for clients under the direction of an approved exercise science professional at various affiliated practicum sites in collaboration with Azusa Pacific University.

Prerequisite: AES 472

AT 160, Acute Care of Injury and Illness, 2 Units

This course follows the basic guidelines of the American Red Cross courses CPR for the Professional Rescuer and First Aid. Included are adult, child, and infant CPR, two-person CPR, use of an AED, and standard first aid procedures. Students may receive American Red Cross certifications upon successful completion of the course.

AT 340, Practicum In Orthopedic Assessment, 2 Units

This course is designed for junior-level students in the Athletic Training Education Program. Students are assigned to clinical instructors who directly supervise them as they work in athletic training settings. As students display competence in the Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they are given increased responsibility in working directly with patients. In addition to the responsibilities of AT 242, students may begin performing orthopedic injury assessments.

Prerequisite: AT 270

AT 355, Medical Conditions and Disabilities, 2 Units

This course covers the basic knowledge, skills, and values that health professionals, specifically those working with athletes and active populations, must possess in order to appropriately recognize and treat those with general medical conditions. Recognition of conditions that must be referred to other healthcare professionals for further evaluation and treatment will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: BIOL 115 or BIOL 250/BIOL 251 and AES 363

AT 444, General Practicum in Athletic Training, 1-3 Units

Students are assigned to clinical instructors who directly supervise them as they work in athletic training settings. As students display competence in the Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they are given increased responsibility in working directly with patients.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into Athletic Training Eduction Program

AT 469, Health Care Administration, 3 Units

This course addresses the organizational and administrative aspects of health care to the physically active. Students study such issues as medical record keeping, facility design and maintenance, leadership strategies, insurance issues, public relations, and legal and ethical issues related to health care.

Corequisite: AES 473 and Senior Standing

AT 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

AT 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The one-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than one unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

AT 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, or electronic media. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisites: upper-division writing intensive course completed or instructor's permission; and junior or senior standing.

ATHL 301, Varsity Baseball: Men, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced preparation in baseball strategy, fundamentals, and techniques for intercollegiate competition. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 302, Varsity Basketball: Men, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced instruction and intensive training in the fundamentals of basketball. Individual and team play, strategy, and offensive and defensive formations are utilized in men's intercollegiate basketball. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 303, Varsity Track and Field: Men and Women, 1-2 Units

Students train and workout two hours daily in various track and field events and compete in intercollegiate track and field meets. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 304, Varsity Cross Country: Men and Women, 1-2 Units

Students receive instruction, practice, and training in distance running for intercollegiate competition. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 305, Varsity Tennis: Men and Women, 1-2 Units

Students are instructed in the mechanics of the game to suit the individual. Supervised practice, lectures, and intercollegiate competition are included. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 307, Varsity Football: Men, 1-2 Units

Conditioning and training are practiced in all phases of modern football. Students view pictures, study plays, and participate in chalk talks, examination of team plays, and intercollegiate competition. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 308, Varsity Basketball: Women, 1-2 Units

Advanced instruction and intensive training in the fundamentals of basketball are offered. Individual and team play, strategy, and offensive and defensive formations are utilized in intercollegiate competition. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 309, Varsity Volleyball: Women, 1-2 Units

Students participate in intercollegiate competition with intense instruction in fundamentals, theory, and practice of the strategies of offensive and defensive play. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 310, Varsity Soccer: Men, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced preparation in strategy, fundamentals, and techniques for intercollegiate competition. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 311, Varsity Soccer: Women, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced preparation in strategy, fundamentals, and techniques for intercollegiate competition. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 312, Varsity Softball: Women, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced preparation in strategy, fundamentals, and techniques for intercollegiate competition. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 313, Varsity Swimming and Diving: Women, 1-2 Units

Students receive instruction, practice, and training in swimming and diving for intercollegiate competition. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 314, Varsity Water Polo: Women, 1-2 Units

Advanced instruction and intensive training in the fundamentals of water polo are offered, including individual and team play, strategy, and offensive and defensive formations in preparation for intercollegiate competition. (varsity athletes only) Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 315, Varsity Acrobatics and Tumbling, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced instruction and training in tumbling, stunting, and dance, including preparing for intercollegiate competition. May be repeated for credit. (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

KIN 102, Foundations of Kinesiology, 2 Units

This course introduces the student to the professions of kinesiology by reviewing the historical foundations of the profession and defining the roles and responsibilities of the exercise scientist. Students learn about relevant professional associations and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology. A discussion of the Azusa Pacific University kinesiology curriculum is included with the goals, objectives, and requirements of the program as well as the expectations of kinesiology students.

KIN 220, Emergency Care and Clinical Skills, 3 Units

The course prepares students for American Red Cross CPR and First Aid certifications. In addition, students will learn and apply clinical skills including assessment of vitals, palpation, goniometry, and manual muscle testing.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 102

KIN 242, Fundamental Principles of Fitness, 3 Units

This foundation course will investigate fitness principles for improving cardio-respiratory endurance, strength, flexibility, body composition and overall physical wellness. The course will prepare students with the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to develop, implement and manage basic fitness programs for physical education students and health fitness clients.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251

KIN 290, Human Movement Science, 3 Units

This course focuses on the physiological and psychological mechanisms underlying the control and learning of human movement throughout the lifespan. Students will apply theoretical concepts of learning to develop age-appropriate movement programs and measure outcomes through biomechanical examinations.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 220 and BIOL 230 or BIOL 250

KIN 306, Sociological and Psychological Aspects of Physical Activity and Sport, 3 Units

Students explore the sociological and the psychological issues related to physical activity and sport. Special emphasis is on the study of sport in North America and its implications within American society. Topics of study include motivation, goal setting, burnout, anxiety and arousal, aggression and ethics as related to physical activity and sport.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in PSYC 110 or PSYC 290

KIN 360, Nutrition for Exercise and Sport Science, 3 Units

This course focuses on optimal nutrition for exercise and training. Particular attention is given to energy nutrients, minerals, and fluid needs of the physically active. Clinical signs associated with nutrition deficiencies are explored as are issues related to disordered eating problems among the physically active. The course reviews antioxidant supplementation for physically active people as well as popular nutritional ergogenic aids. Students become proficient at using current nutrition education tools and evaluating their energy intake and physical activity output using a computerized diet analysis program. Special topics on eating while traveling are also covered.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251 and KIN 290

KIN 363, Physiology of Exercise, 4 Units

This course focuses on the effects of exercise on human physiology and bioenergetics. The physiological changes and adaptations to exercise on the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromuscular, and endocrine systems are investigated in detail. The relationship between nutrition, body composition, and exercise are discussed. The laboratory component explores the assessment of resting metabolic rate, energy expenditure, body composition, cardio-respiratory function, maximum oxygen uptake, lactate threshold, strength and flexibility, and other physiological responses to exercise.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251 and KIN 290

KIN 364, Kinesiology, 4 Units

This course examines structural and functional mechanics of human movement through an in-depth study of kinesiological principles. Techniques of posture and gait evaluation, as well as fundamentals of body mechanics are included, along with the detection and correction of basic musculoskeletal anomalies. A laboratory component is included.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251 and KIN 290

KIN 366, Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries, 3 Units

This course presents the methods used in the recognition, evaluation, and care of athletic injuries. Techniques in taping, prevention, and rehabilitation of injuries are studied.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251

KIN 372, Corrective Exercise Strategies, 3 Units

This course provides corrective exercise strategies to prevent or reduce injury and afford optimal tissue recovery in the physically active. Principles of tissue inhibition, lengthening, activation, and human movement integration are explored. Strategies in advanced kinetic chain assessment, flexibility, neuromuscular retraining, and balance and stability exercises are incorporated. In addition, scientific evidence supporting injury prevention programs are discussed. This course provides information to prepare students for professional certifications through the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM).

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 363 and KIN 364

KIN 380, Concepts of Performance Enhancement, 3 Units

This course will examine advanced methods for enhancing human performance. Students will gain a theoretical understanding of the acute and chronic adaptations that occur in response to various anaerobic and aerobic training techniques. Students will also be given the opportunity to gain practical experience developing, implementing, and supervising strength and condition programs for both teams and individual athletes. Areas of emphasis include periodization, movement-based programming, and experience with non-traditional implements. This course is designed to enhance students' current level of knowledge in preparation for the nationally accredited Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) Exam.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 363 and KIN 364

KIN 395, Fitness Management, 4 Units

This course addresses the organizational and administrative aspects of fitness instruction to the physically active. Students study issues such as record keeping, facility design and maintenance, public relations and marketing, and legal and ethical issues related to health care.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251 and KIN 242

KIN 473, Fitness and Exercise Prescription, 4 Units

This course covers the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities that fitness professionals must possess to work with medical and special populations. The course will focus on evaluating health behaviors and risk factors, conducting fitness assessments, constructing appropriate exercise prescriptions, and motivating individuals to modify negative health habits and maintain positive lifestyle behaviors for health promotion.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 363 and KIN 364

KIN 478, Senior Preparation in Kinesiology, 3 Units

This course is a culminating seminar for graduating seniors in kinesiology. Strategies for professional growth and development will be examined. Current issues and future trends related to the variety of professional opportunities in the field of kinesiology will also be discussed.

Corequisites: KIN 490 and Senior Standing

KIN 490, Writing 3: Research Methods in Kinesiology, 3 Units

The focus of the course is on the critical reading of kinesiology literature, the interpretation of research, and the analysis of research methodology appropriate in the field. This course is designed to enhance students' abilities to be consumers of research information, participants in the research process, and communicators of research results. Students are required to conduct a research project and write a comprehensive research report, including introduction, literature review, methods, results, discussion, and conclusions. Discussions also focus on current knowledge and future trends in kinesiology, as seen in the literature. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 363, KIN 364, Writing 2

KIN 495, Internship in Exercise Science, 1-4 Units

This course helps students to apply their knowledge, skills, and abilities in a practical setting. Students use an integrated approach to the assessment, development, implementation, and management of exercise and fitness programs under the direction of an approved exercise science professional. Each unit requires 50 clock hours of internship experience. This course may be repeated for credit (2 units are required for the major). Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 363 and KIN 364

PE 101, Leisure Time Preparation: Badminton, 1 Unit

Students study the individual's physical fitness and recreational needs. Development of skills related to fitness through badminton is combined in the class plan. Does not meet Fitness for Life requirement.

PE 102, Leisure Time Preparation: Golf, 1 Unit

Students study golf as a lifetime recreational activity. Does not meet Fitness for Life requirement.

PE 103, Leisure Time Preparation: Volleyball, 1 Unit

Students study the individual's recreational needs through the development of skills related to volleyball. This class may also be taught on grass. Does not meet Fitness for Life requirement.

PE 104, Leisure Time Preparation: Tennis, 1 Unit

Students study the individual's recreational needs through the development of skills related to tennis. Does not meet Fitness for Life requirement.

PE 105, Outdoor Experience: Camping, 1 Unit

Students study the camping programs available to the public today and survey equipment, sites, and educational opportunities. Practical experience includes two weekend camping expeditions. Does not meet the Fitness for Life requirement.

PE 106, Outdoor Exp: Backpacking, 1 Unit

This course teaches the fundamental principles of backpacking. Topics covered include: equipment selection, outdoor leadership, navigation, safety and emergency procedures, backcountry cooking, trip planning, and Leave No Trace. Practical experience includes one weekend backpacking expedition.

PE 107, Outdoor Experience: Rock Climbing, 1 Unit

This course teaches the fundamental principles of rock climbing. Topics covered include: equipment selection, movement on rock, history of the sport, knots, belaying techniques, basic anchor construction, self-rescue techniques, rating systems and climbing topos, rappelling and Leave No Trace. Practical experience includes 3 day-long rock climbing trips. *This course will NOT include lead climbing techniques.

PE 113, Lifeguard Training, 2 Units

This is a certified, advanced life-saving course of the American Red Cross. This is not a Fitness for Life class. This class does not meet the General Education requirement for University Skills and Requirements.

PE 114, Water Safety Instructor (WSI) Course, 2 Units

This is a certified WSI course of the American Red Cross. This is not a Fitness for Life class. This class does not meet the General Education requirement for University Skills and Requirements.

PE 138, Introduction to Physical Education, 2 Units

This course introduces students interested in careers as physical education teachers to professional dimensions, roles, and responsibilities of physical educators in the 21st century. Students gain an understanding of the physical education profession through assignments, class discussions, on-site school observations, shadowing professionals and some service-learning activities.

PE 237, Methods of Teaching Rhythmic and Multicultural Activities, 3 Units

This course focuses on skill development, teaching methodology, analysis and evaluation of fundamental rhythmic activities, social dance, and global and nontraditional games.

Prerequisite: For Kinesiology with PE Concentration and Liberal Studies with PE Concentration students only.

PE 240, Health Education, 2 Units

This course focuses on the development of the whole-person concept which includes the mental, emotional, social, spiritual, and physical health practices. This integration includes study of such topics as stress, diet, nutrition, communicable and chronic diseases, alcohol and drug abuse, lifestyles, childbirth, physical fitness, and environmental health. To be taken concurrently with a Fitness for Life or varsity sport course.

PE 250, Methods of Teaching Individual Sports, 2 Units

This course focuses on skill development, teaching methodology, analysis and evaluation of fundamental tennis, golf, badminton, and track and field skills.

Prerequisite: For Kinesiology with PE Concentration and Liberal Studies with PE Concentration students only.

PE 251, Methods of Teaching Contemporary Activities, 3 Units

This course focuses on skill development, teaching methodology, analysis and evaluation of contemporary physical education activities, including combatives, cooperative games, outdoor education, swimming and water safety.

Prerequisite: For Kinesiology with PE Concentration and Liberal Studies with PE Concentration students only.

PE 252, Methods of Teaching Team Sports, 3 Units

This course focuses on skill development, teaching methodology, analysis and evaluation of fundamental basketball, soccer, volleyball, softball, and football skills.

Prerequisite: For Kinesiology with PE Concentration and Liberal Studies with PE Concentration students only.

PE 320, History and Principles of Physical Education, 3 Units

The historical and philosophical development of physical education and sport is studied. This course includes discussion of current theories, philosophies, and practices in the profession. The California Framework for Physical Education is examined. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

PE 321, Organization and Administration of Physical Education, Athletics, and Recreation, 3 Units

The basic principles of organization, administration, and supervision are stressed with emphasis on topics such as staffing, budget, program organization, purchasing, and management in the individual areas of physical education, athletics, and recreation.

PE 325, Motor Development and Learning, 3 Units

This course is designed to teach motor learning theories and to provide the necessary skills to apply these theories when teaching motor skills. This course will also include the study of locomotor and non-locomotor patterns, manipulative, rhythmical movement patterns and skill development, as they relate to motor learning. These fundamental principles will be analyzed in terms of teaching elementary school children. Required for physical education majors and liberal studies majors with a physical education concentration.

Prerequisites: BIOL 115 or BIOL 250 and BIOL 251. PE or Liberal Studies PE Concentration majors only.

PE 364, Kinesiology, 3 Units

The structural and functional mechanics of movement through an in-depth study of kinesiological, corrective, and adaptive principles are analyzed. Techniques of postural evaluation, muscle testing, therapeutic exercises, and fundamentals of body mechanics are coupled with kinesiological principles for the detection and correction of basic neuromusculoskeletal anomalies.

Prerequisites: BIOL 115, or BIOL 250 and BIOL 251.

PE 423, School Health Education, 3 Units

Health issues that the classroom teacher will face are studied. Proper cooperation with medical services, provision of healthful classroom environment, and methods of health instruction are explored.

PE 433, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Football, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching football are studied.

PE 434, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Track and Field, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching track and field are studied.

PE 435, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Basketball, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching basketball are studied.

PE 436, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Baseball, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching baseball are studied.

PE 437, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Volleyball, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching volleyball are studied.

PE 438, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Soccer, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching soccer are studied.

PE 440, Coaching Theory, 2 Units

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the coaching profession. The primary goal of the course is to develop and enhance students' knowledge and understanding of concepts and techniques of coaching and their application to achieving important objectives in working with athletes. The course and textbook combine sport science theory and research with practical knowledge and methods of expert coaches. Prereq for PE 474 Coaching Practicum

Prerequisite: KIN 242, KIN 290

PE 450, Physical Education in Elementary Schools, K-6, 3 Units

This course prepares students to teach physical education to children in grades K-6. It uses a development approach and stresses exploratory methods of teaching young children a variety of games, dance, self-testing, movement exploration, lifetime and health-related fitness activities. The class places emphasis on lesson plan development, writing clear objectives, and developing effective classroom management skills.

Prerequisites: EDLS 300, PE 325 or PSYC 290, and JR/SR Standing

PE 451, Methods in Physical Education: 7-12, 3 Units

This course provides a classroom and practical teaching experience for the prospective physical educator. Emphasis is on the development of viable unit plans utilizing National Content Standards and California State Content Standards, along with the development of a teaching style effective for the age group and effective in accomplishing stated daily objectives. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: EDLS 300, PE 450, and junior/senior standing

PE 452, Adapted Physical Education, 3 Units

This is an introductory course designed for prospective physical education teachers for the purpose of understanding public laws and developing and modifying programs for the developmentally disabled.

Prerequisite: EDLS 300, PE 450, and junior/senior standing

PE 474, Practicum in Coaching, 2 Units

Students study the application of theory and methods in an actual coaching situation. Supervision and evaluation are conducted by the coaching staff of the cooperating schools. The experience lasts the duration of the selected sport's season.

PE 475, Tests and Measurements in Physical Education and Sports, 3 Units

This course analyzes the measurements of motor behavior and evaluation of physical skills performance. Effectiveness of the program in physical education and exercise science is examined. Basic concepts of statistics are taught along with the introduction of computers as tools to be used in the professional arena.

PE 478, Senior Preparation in Physical Education, 2 Units

This course is designed as a culminating seminar for graduating seniors to discuss, plan, and implement strategies for future professional advancement. Current professional issues, growth, and future trends are examined.

PE 490, Applied Physical Education, 1-3 Units

The course helps prospective physical education teachers obtain a professionally guided experience benefiting them in primary and secondary schools. This course is open to physical education majors only with the program director's approval.

PE 496, Senior Seminar: Ethics in Physical Education and Sport, 3 Units

This course is designed to facilitate the integration of Christian faith and values with careers in physical education and sport. Biblical and theological themes relating to education and sport will provide the basis for discussion of ethical dilemmas facing professionals in these, and related, professions. Students will be challenged to develop personal strategies and philosophies for responding to ethical issues in their chosen careers.

Prerequisites: Senior standing, completion of the majority of the units required for God's Word and the Christian Response, and upper-division writing intensive course.

PE 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time faculty member. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

PE 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. Each 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

PE 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, or electronic media. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisites: upper-division writing intensive course completed or instructor's permission; and junior or senior standing.

Faculty

Department Chair

Sharon Lehman, Ed.D.

Program Director, B.S. in Kinesiology

Eric Sorenson, Ph.D., ATC

Program Director, M.S. in Athletic Training

Christopher Schmidt, Ph.D., ATC

Professors

Sue Hebel, Ed.D., ATC

Cynthia McKnight, Ph.D., ATC

Associate Professors

Andrew Alstot, Ph.D.

Sharon Lehman, Ed.D.

Jennifer Livingston, Ph.D., ATC

Christopher Schmidt, Ph.D., ATC

Eric Sorenson, Ph.D., ATC

Cindy Tanis, Ph.D., ATC

William (Jody) Wilkinson, MD

Assistant Professors

Gregory Bellinder, M.S.

Doug Crowell, M.S., CSCS, HFS, CES, CPT

Robert Dudley, M.S.

Christy Hancock, DAT, ATC, PES, CES

Nathanael Meckes, Ph.D., PES

Paul Saville, Ph.D., CSCS

Coaching Faculty

Mike Barnett, M.A.

Dave Blomquist, M.A.

Rudy Carlton, M.A., CPT

Victor Santa Cruz, M.A.

Chris Keife, M.S.

Tim Kyle, M.A.

Justin Leslie, MBA

Kevin Reid, M.A.

Cesar Rivas-Sandoval, M.Ed.

Julie Snodgrass, M.A.

Paul Svagdis, M.A.

Carrie Webber, M.A.