Department of History and Political Science

Mission Statement

The Department of History and Political Science at Azusa Pacific University:

  1. Offers undergraduate degree programs in political science, history, international relations, and social science, and preparation for a teaching credential in social science.
  2. Provides General Education in history and political science courses consistent with the outcomes of a liberal arts education.
  3. Prepares students for graduate study, law school, or success in their chosen careers.

Department Overview

This department offers majors in history, international relationspolitical science, and social science, and minors in classics, history, international relationspolitical science, and prelaw. The department is also home to chapters of the national political science honor society, Pi Sigma Alpha; the national history honor society, Phi Alpha Theta; and the international legal community honor society, Phi Delta Phi.

Many courses in the department emphasize the reading of classic texts or the study of primary sources. All courses offered in the department are within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and are designed to contribute to a Christian liberal arts education.

The department’s programs strive to:

  • Develop intellectual curiosity.
  • Equip students with the abilities to write and speak well, think critically, and judge wisely.
  • Enable students to distinguish justice from injustice.
  • Teach students the legitimate purposes and necessary limits of political power.
  • Provide students historical perspective for making judgments in the present.
  • Instruct students in human possibilities and limits.
  • Prepare students for careers calling for clear, cogent reasoning.
  • Familiarize students with other cultures and times.
  • Make available to students the knowledge that is needed by citizens and political leaders.
  • Prepare students to teach various social science disciplines.

To graduate as department majors and minors, students must maintain at least a 2.0 grade-point average in major courses.

Students who want to earn up to 9 units in their major through the American Studies Program in Washington, DC, may do so by arrangement with the Department of History and Political Science.

Program Learning Goals

The Department of History and Political Science prepares students who are able to:

Classics

  • Demonstrate mastery of the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of classical Greek and Latin.
  • Describe the laws, religion, art and architecture, philosophy, and government forms of ancient Greece or ancient Rome.
  • Articulate a Christian perspective of truth and life.

History

  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the major events in American history.
  • Describe and analyze the main features of major world civilizations.
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of primary and secondary historical source material.
  • Articulate a Christian worldview of history.

Political Science and International Relations

  • Explain the main features of international politics.
  • Analyze the writing of major thinkers in the history of political philosophy.
  • Explain the principles, purposes, and main features of American government.
  • Articulate a Christian understanding of politics and government.
  • Articulate the major schools of thought respecting international relations.
  • Describe the principal interests and ideas that inform U.S. foreign policy.

Social Science

  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the major events in American history.
  • Describe and analyze the main features of major world civilizations.
  • Explain the principles, purposes, and main features of American government.
  • Articulate a Christian worldview of history.

HIST 120, World Civilizations to 1648, 3 Units

This survey course deals with the customs, cultures, religions, and forms of government of peoples from ancient times to 1648. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HIST 121, World Civilizations Since 1648, 3 Units

This survey course deals with the customs, cultures, religions, and forms of government of peoples from 1648 to the present. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HIST 121H, World Civilizations Since 1648 - Honors, 3 Units

This survey course deals with the customs, cultures, religions, and forms of government of peoples from 1648 to the present. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HIST 151, United States History to 1877, 3 Units

This course surveys the political and cultural history of the United States up to 1877. Areas of study include concepts of government and analysis of political institutions. This course meets the state requirement in U.S. history and government. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HIST 152, United States History Since 1877, 3 Units

This course surveys the political and cultural history of the United States from 1865 to the present. Areas of study include concepts of government and analysis of political institutions. This course meets the state requirement in U.S. history and government. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HIST 201, World Civilizations and Geography to 1648, 3 Units

This survey course incorporates human geography as a crucial means to understand the narrative of histories, religions, migrations, and forms of government of people and civilizations from the ancient times to 1648. In doing so, this course aims to study the distribution, processes, and effects of the human population on our planet during this time period.

Prerequisite: Liberal Studies Majors Only

HIST 202, United States History to 1930, 3 Units

This course surveys the political and cultural history of the United States from its colonial origins to 1930. Subject matter includes concepts of government and analysis of political institutions. This course meets the state requirements in U.S. history and government.

Prerequisite: Liberal Studies Majors Only

HIST 210, World Geography, 3 Units

This course is a study of cultural, historical, and political geography. It includes study of the ways people interact with their natural environments, the ways different cultures interact with one another, the global patterns of human migration and settlement, and the distinctive natural, linguistic, cultural, and political features of different regions of the world.

HIST 235, Cultural History/Travel Study, 3 Units

This cultural history course combines visits of major cultural and historical sites with academic study of the geography, history, art, literature, politics and religion of the country, region, or continent. The interdisciplinary course is taught by one or more faculty and developed around a history core from which each student may choose to develop an intensive focus upon art and architecture, history, literature, politics, or church history. May be repeated for credit as topics/locations vary. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

HIST 300, Writing 3: Introduction to Historical Studies, 3 Units

This course instruct students in historical methodology, focusing on the skills necessary for historical research and writing, and a foundational knowledge of historiography. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2

HIST 311, Ancient Greece, 3 Units

This course is designed to introduce students to the laws, religions, art and architecture, philosophy, and governmental forms of Ancient Greece. Covers Myceanean Greece, Classical Sparta and Athens, Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, the Rise of Macedon, Alexander and the Hellenistic world, and the Greek experience under Roman rule.

HIST 312, Ancient Rome, 3 Units

This course is designed to introduce students to the laws, religions, art and architecture, philosophy, and governmental forms of Ancient Rome. Covers Republican and Imperial Rome, the Pax Romana, 3rd Century Crisis, and the Christianization and Fall of Rome.

HIST 320, Modern Africa, 3 Units

This course explores the political, social, cultural, and religious history of Africa from the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present.

Prerequisites: HIST 120 or HIST 121 recommended

HIST 325, Topics in French History, 3 Units

This variable topics course will examine a select topic or theme of French history, and the relationship of France to the world. The course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Recommended prerequisites: 100-level History or FREN 101

HIST 334, History of American Foreign Affairs, 3 Units

This course is a study of American foreign affairs and international relations from 1776 to the present.

HIST 335, Cultural History/Travel Study, 3 Units

This cultural history course combines visits of major cultural and historical sites with academic study of the geography, history, art, literature, politics, and religion of the country, region, or continent. The interdisciplinary course is taught by a team of two to four faculty and developed around a history core, from which each student may choose to develop an intensive focus upon art and architecture, history, literature, politics, or church history.

HIST 335H, Cult Hist/Travel Study-Honors, 3 Units

This cultural history course combines visits of major cultural and historical sites with academic study of the geography, history, art, literature, politics, and religion of the country, region, or continent. The interdisciplinary course is taught by a team of two to four faculty and developed around a history core, from which each student may choose to develop an intensive focus upon art and architecture, history, literature, politics, or church history.

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HIST 338, History of California, 3 Units

Students learn about the exploration, colonization, and development of Hispanic California; the coming of the Americans; and the political, economic, and cultural development of California since its acquisition by the United States.

HIST 342, The American West, 3 Units

This course offers coverage of the exploration and development of the West, mining and stock-raising frontiers, railroads, and agriculture, and the effects of the frontier on American institutions.

HIST 346, History of American Immigration, 3 Units

This course examines immigration and ethnicity in America from the Colonial period to the present. Themes include ethnic formation, assimilation, nativism, and the relationship of ethnicity to American national identity. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

HIST 350, Medieval Europe, 3 Units

This course is a study of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance.

HIST 352, Renaissance and Reformation, 3 Units

This course is a study of Europe from the 15th century to 1648. It covers intellectual, social, and political changes, and religious revolt and wars.

HIST 357, Enlightenment Europe, 3 Units

This course studies European history from 1648-1789. The course focuses on the intellectual and cultural movement known as the Enlightenment and its effects on politics, diplomacy, economics, society, and religion.

HIST 358, Europe 1789-1914, 3 Units

This course studies European political, intellectual, social, diplomatic, and religious history from the French Revolution to the start of World War I.

HIST 359, Europe 1914-1992, 3 Units

This course studies European political, intellectual, social, diplomatic, and religious history from World War I to the fall of the Soviet Union.

HIST 360, History of the Middle East I: Early and Medieval Islam, 3 Units

This course covers the historical foundations of the premodern Middle East beginning with the pre-Islamic Near East and Arabia and continuing with Muhammad and the origins of the Islamic tradition; the establishment of regional Islamic rule, ideology, and institutions; and the medieval dynasties up to and including the Ottomans. The course primarily focuses on general political narrative, but also considers social and cultural dynamics of the early and medieval Islamic world.

HIST 361, History of the Middle East II: Modern Middle East, 3 Units

This course covers the historical foundations of the early modern and modern Middle East, beginning with later Ottoman history (18th century) and continuing through to the present day. It covers a variety of countries/communities within the region, including Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, and Israel/Palestine, and it also includes a variety of topics within this chronological and geographical expanse, such as nationalisms, ideologies, social movements, and cultural identity.

HIST 365, History of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, 3 Units

This course covers the historical dynamics of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the beginnings of early Zionist thought and settlement in the late 19th century to the present day.

HIST 368, A Year in Time, 3 Units

Taking a global approach, this course examines the political, intellectual, cultural, social, diplomatic, and religious developments of one specific year in history. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of primary resources in historical research and writing. The course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic or year studied

HIST 374, Colonial Era, 3 Units

This course is a study of the English colonies in America during 1609-1776. Themes include institutions, life, and customs, intercolonial relations, imperial control; and the movement for independence.

HIST 376, The Revolution and the Republic, 3 Units

This course examines major topics in the history of the United States between the American Revolution and the early antebellum period, paying special attention to the impact of political development on religion, culture, and economic systems, and gender, ethnic, and racial interactions.

HIST 380, Civil War and Reconstruction, 3 Units

This course is a study of the causes of sectional conflict, the Civil War, and political, social, and economic reconstruction (1850-77).

HIST 380H, Civil War and Reconstruction - Honors, 3 Units

This course is a study of the causes of sectional conflict, the Civil War, and political, social, and economic reconstruction (1850-77).

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HIST 382, Emergence of Modern America, 3 Units

This course is a study of the period 1878-1918, including political and intellectual change, the advent of big business, urbanization, reform, and the coming of World War I.

HIST 386, Modern America, 3 Units

This course is a study of the intellectual, political, economic, and social history of America from 1918 to the present.

HIST 389, Modern American Intellectual History, 3 Units

This course introduces students to some of the most important ideas, thinkers, and intellectual debates that have shaped life in the United States from the late nineteenth century through the present. Through a study of movements including pragmatism, progressivism, liberalism, and conservatism, the course examines the role of science, philosophy, and religion in providing intellectual foundations for liberal democracy. It also examines the relationship between modernity and postmodernity, and traces the growth of the American university system as a primary institutional site for intellectual life

HIST 392, Colonial Latin America, 3 Units

Utilizing primary and secondary sources, music, film, and literature, this course examines the history of Colonial America (c. 1460s-1820s), with particular emphasis on the role of Christianity in the development, success, and failure of the Spanish imperial project in the New World.

Prerequisite: HIST 120

HIST 393, Modern Latin America, 3 Units

Utilizing primary and secondary sources, music, film, and literature, this course examines the history of Modern Latin America (c. 1820s-present), from its colonial legacy to its nation building period, revolutions and coups, and modern manifestations, with special emphasis on its relationship to the United States and developments in local Christianity.

Prerequisite: HIST 120

HIST 401, Humanities Seminar, 6 Units

Subject matter for this course varies. The pre-announced topic is addressed from an interdisciplinary perspective and includes some of the following: history, literature, sociology, art, religion, biblical studies, and language. Each time this course is offered it is further defined with a subtitle.

HIST 402, Historical Research Skills, 6 Units

Subject matter for this course varies. The course emphasizes one of the following: historical research skills, archaeological methods, or language study. The course includes access to primary archival resources, field experiences, and/or trips to historical sites. Each time this course is offered it is further defined with a subtitle.

HIST 403, Church History Seminar, 6 Units

Subject matter for this course varies. The course includes an intensive study of a specific era in church history. Each time this course is offered it is further defined with a subtitle.

HIST 404, Archaeology Field Experience, 6 Units

This field experience is only offered at the Wadi Natrun archaeological dig in Egypt. It includes hands-on field experience.

HIST 420, Topics in Cinema and History, 3 Units

This course explores the relationship between film and history regarding a specific historical era, studying films made at that era and about that era. Students are expected to attend weekly film screenings in addition to scheduled classes. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies.

Prerequisite: WRIT 110

HIST 484, Historical Themes, 3 Units

Subject matter for this course varies and may include topics in non-Western, European, and United States history. This course may be repeated for credit.

HIST 484H, Historical Themes - Honors, 3 Units

Subject matter for this course varies and may include topics in non-Western, European, and United States history. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HIST 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This course consists of a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

HIST 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

HIST 498H, Directed Research- Honors, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The one-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than one unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Honors program, Junior or Senior Standing

HIST 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, electronic media, or artistic creation of a material form. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisites: upper-division writing intensive course completed or instructor's permission; and junior or senior standing.

HIST 499H, Thesis/Project - Honors, 3 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis and communication. The one-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, electronic media, or artistic creation of a material form. No more than one unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisites: Junior of Senior standing and Upper-division writing intensive course completed. Must also be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HUM 201, Intercultural Knowledge and Competence, 3 Units

This course employs a team-taught, transdisciplinary approach to expanding students' intercultural knowledge and experience in three stages. First, through a study of core texts in the humanities, it studies a chronologically arranged variety of cultural perspectives on the meaning and value of the natural world. Second, it punctuates this study with affective experience in a new cultural setting (typically by visiting with a representative from local Native American or Armenian communities). Third, it requires students to reflect upon and analyze their own culturally structured environmental attitudes. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

HUM 202, Civic Knowledge and Engagement, 3 Units

This course employs a team-taught, transdisciplinary approach to expanding students' understanding of and commitment to civic engagement in three stages. First, through a study of core texts in the humanities, it examines a chronologically arranged variety of perspectives on the ethical responsibility of humans to their natural environment. Second, it punctuates this study with affective experience in the pristine Ansel Adams Wilderness, an experience that provides a hands-on encounter with the magnificently fragile world God has charged us to nurture. Finally, this course requires students to reflect upon and analyze their own civic responsibilities toward the environment through a final research project. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

HUM 221, Core Texts in History, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected classic works that shaped and represented different civilizations in a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 221 and HUM 321 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 321. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HUM 221H, Humanities Seminar I: Great Works - Honors, 3-4 Units

This course offers a study of selected classic works that shaped and represented different civilizations in a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the Azusa campus, this is a three-unit course. At the High Sierra site, it is worth four units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). HUM 221H and HUM 321H may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 321H. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HUM 222, Core Texts in Literature, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected literary texts from a variety of cultures and genres in a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 222 and HUM 322 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 322. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Language Literature. 

HUM 222H, Humanities Seminar II: Literary Masterpieces - Honors, 3-4 Units

This course offers a study of selected literary texts from a variety of cultures and genres in a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the APU campus, this is a three-unit course. At the High Sierra site, it is worth four units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). HUM 222 and HUM 322 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 322. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Language Literature. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HUM 223, Core Texts in Aesthetics, 3 Units

A study of the creative process and of selected aesthetic masterpieces in a variety of cultures and genres from a specified historical era. Taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 223 and HUM 323 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 323. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Fine Arts. 

HUM 223H, Humanities Seminar III: Aesthetics - Honors, 3-4 Units

A study of the creative process and of selected aesthetic masterpieces in a variety of cultures and genres from a specified historical era. Taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the Azusa campus, this is a three-unit course. At the High Sierra semester, it is worth four units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). HUM 223H and HUM 323H may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 323H. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Fine Arts. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HUM 224, Core Texts in Philosophy, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected philosophical works illustrating intellectual perspectives of a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 224 and HUM 324 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 324. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Philosophy. 

HUM 224H, Humanities Seminar IV: Great Ideas - Honors, 3-4 Units

This course offers a study of selected philosophical works illustrating intellectual perspectives of a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the APU campus, this is a three-unit course. At the High Sierra site, it is worth four units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). HUM 224H and HUM 324H may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 324H. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Philosophy. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HUM 321, Core Texts in History, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected classic works that shaped and represented different civilizations in a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 221 and HUM 321 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 321. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HUM 321H, Humanities Seminar I: Great Works - Honors, 3-4 Units

This course offers a study of selected classic works that shaped and represented different civilizations in a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the Azusa campus, this is a three-unit course. At the High Sierra semester, it is worth four units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). HUM 221H and HUM 321H may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 321H. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HUM 322, Core Texts in Literature, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected literary texts from a variety of cultures and genres taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 222 and HUM 322 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 322. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Language Literature. 

HUM 322H, Humanities Seminar II: Literary Masterpieces - Honors, 3-4 Units

This course offers a study of selected literary texts from a variety of cultures and genres in a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the Azusa campus, this is a three-unit course. At the High Sierra semester, it is worth four units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). HUM 222H and HUM 322H may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 322H. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Language Literature. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HUM 323, Core Texts in Aesthetics, 3 Units

This course offers a study of the creative process and selected aesthetic masterpieces in a variety of cultures and genres from a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 223 and HUM 323 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 323. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Fine Arts. 

HUM 323H, Humanities Seminar III: Aesthetics - Honors, 3-4 Units

A study of the creative process and of selected aesthetic masterpieces in a variety of cultures and genres from a specified historical era. Taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the Azusa campus, this is a three-unit course. At the High Sierra semester, it is worth four units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). HUM 223H and HUM 323H may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 323H. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Fine Arts. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HUM 324, Core Texts in Philosophy, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected philosophical works illustrating intellectual perspectives of a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the Azusa campus, this is a 3-unit course. At the High Sierra Semester, it is worth 4 units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). HUM 224 and HUM 324 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 324. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Philosophy. 

HUM 324H, Humanities Seminar IV: Great Ideas - Honors, 3-4 Units

This course offers a study of selected philosophical works illustrating intellectual perspectives of a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the Azusa campus, this is a three-unit course. At the High Sierra semester, it is worth four units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). HUM 224H and HUM 324H may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 324H. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Philosophy. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

HUM 325, Humanities Seminar V: Christian Classics, 3-4 Units

This course offers a study of selected Christian classics on Christian life and doctrine from a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the Azusa campus, this is a 3-unit course. At the High Sierra Semester, it is worth 4 units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Theology. 

HUM 325H, Humanities Seminar V: Christian Classics - Honors, 3-4 Units

This course offers a study of selected Christian classics on Christian life and doctrine from a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. On the Azusa campus, this is a three-unit course. At the High Sierra semester, it is worth four units and is to be taken with one or more other Humanities Seminar(s). This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Theology. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

POLI 150, American Government, 3 Units

This course is a study of the institutions and processes of American government on the local, state, and national levels. This course meets the state requirement for U.S. history and government. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

POLI 150H, American Government - Honors, 3 Units

This course is a study of the institutions and processes of American government on the local, state, and national levels. This course meets the state requirement for U.S. history and government. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

POLI 160, Introduction to Politics, 3 Units

This course introduces the beginning political science student to the fundamental themes and enduring problems of political life.

POLI 160H, Introduction to Politics - Honors, 3 Units

This course introduces the beginning political science student to the fundamental themes and enduring problems of political life.

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

POLI 180, Intro to International Relations, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the academic study of international relations, beginning with classical discussions about the interaction of peoples, continuing to focus on modern nations and their trade, diplomacy, foreign aid and conflicts. Students will consider the challenges faced within particular world regions beyond the West, with units on Latin America, Africa, Asia, Middle East, and their particular regional opportunities. Also covered are particular problems of international relations of our time - nuclear/chemical/biological weapons, terrorism, and cyber conflict, as well as international opportunities including strategies to achieve greater economic development, trade, and communication.

POLI 210, Current Events, 3 Units

Students explore selected current domestic and foreign policy issues.

POLI 220, State and Local Government, 3 Units

This course offers a comparison of the organizations, processes, and functions of local government in the United States, including counties, cities, and special districts.

POLI 250, Introduction to Criminal Law, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the concepts of criminal law, including history and development, constitutional limitations on crimes and punishment, principles of criminal liability, criminal defenses, inchoate crimes, and elements of crimes against persons, property, and habitation.

POLI 260, Introduction to Legal Transactions, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of personal and business legal transactions, introducing students to the importance of the law, concepts of business formation and transactions, corporations, contracts, intellectual property, cyberlaw, employment law, bankruptcy, and estate planning.

POLI 271, Political Topics, 3 Units

Subject matter for this course varies and may include topics in political theory, American government, and international affairs. Possible topics include: nuclear arms, religion and politics, and presidential elections. POLI 271 and POLI 471 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in POLI 471. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Up to eight units may be earned for participation in seminars offered by the American Studies Program.

POLI 300, Research and Writing, 3 Units

This is an upper-division writing intensive course emphasizing the research and writing skills common to the disciplines of history and political science. Strongly recommended before taking any 300- or 400-level courses. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

POLI 300H, Research and Writing - Honors, 3 Units

This is an upper-division writing intensive course emphasizing the research and writing skills common to the disciplines of history and political science. Strongly recommended before taking any 300- or 400-level courses. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

POLI 310, Political Geography, 3 Units

This course considers the impact of geography on political life broadly understood, including population and migration, governments and political institutions, national boundaries and border conflicts, economic development, trade and cultural relations between nations and peoples, and the development and future of the nation.

POLI 320, Comparative Politics, 3 Units

This course offers a comparative study of major political systems. The communist, socialist, and democratic systems are compared as they have been applied in various states.

POLI 325, Seminar in International Relations, 3 Units

This course facilitates focused inquiry into one or more pre-announced subjects relating to current international relations. Possible topics include nuclear weapons, cybersecurity, or humanitarian relief assistance. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or instructor's consent

POLI 326, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, 3 Units

Students analyze Supreme Court decisions related to the Bill of Rights and the 14th Amendment.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor's consent

POLI 340, International Relations, 3 Units

The foundations and development of the nation-state system are explored, with an emphasis on policy formation and conflict resolution.

POLI 340H, International Relations - Honors, 3 Units

The foundations and development of the nation-state system are explored, with an emphasis on policy formation and conflict resolution.

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

POLI 350, Constitutional Law: Fundamental Freedoms, 3 Units

This course analyzes U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to constitutional civil rights and liberties found in the Bill of Rights and 14th Amendment, including freedoms of speech, press, religion, assembly; the right to bear arms; due process and equal protection; and political rights related to representation, voting, and naturalization.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor's consent

POLI 351, Constitutional Law: Criminal Justice, 3 Units

The course analyzes U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to the constitutional protections offered to criminal defendants found in the Bill of Rights and 14th Amendment, including the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures, the privilege against self-incrimination, the right to counsel, the right to a jury trial, the protection against excessive bail and cruel and unusual punishment, and other due process guarantees.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor's consent

POLI 352, Constitutional Law: National Powers, 3 Units

This course is an inquiry into the Supreme Court's interpretation of the Constitution concerning the powers of the states, the president, Congress, and the courts.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor's consent

POLI 353, Seminar on Legal Studies, 3 Units

This course is a study of forms of law school writing, the profession of the law, and the philosophy of law as it has developed from ancient to contemporary times. The course is primarily for students intending to pursue a career in law and should ideally be taken by students in their junior year.

Prerequisites: POLI 350 or POLI 351 or POLI 352 or Instructor's consent

POLI 360, Classical Political Thought, 3 Units

This course is a study of ancient Greek political thought with some reference to Roman and medieval political thought. The course focuses on ideas of justice, nature, and human nature.

POLI 363, Modern Political Thought, 3 Units

This course is a study of major political thinkers from the 16th century to the present.

POLI 376, The American Founding, 3 Units

This is a study of the central ideas of American constitutional democracy as they are illuminated in selected writings of the American founders and in modern contemporary scholarship on the American founding.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 and POLI 160 or instructor's consent

POLI 380, Terrorism and Counterterrorism, 3 Units

This course considers the sources, history, and motivations behind terrorism, the tools and tactics employed by terrorists, and terrorist organizations' political objectives, with emphasis on recent and current terrorism. Students also consider the phenomenon of state terrorism, the theory and practice of counterterrorism, and the variety of Christian responses to terrorism.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or POLI 160

POLI 381, Theories of International Relations, 3 Units

This course is a detailed examination of the major classical, modern, and postmodern theoretical schools of thought that inform the study of International Relations. Readings include original classic treatises and monograph length statements of theory, alongside recent publications.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or Instructor consent

POLI 382, Diplomacy and Foreign Policy, 3 Units

This course provides a comprehensive examination of theoretical approaches to the analysis of foreign policy, as well as an examination of the conduct of U.S. diplomacy abroad. Case studies are used to illustrate analytical models, and active learning through team-based simulation emphasizes the practical aspects of negotiation and statecraft.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or instructor's consent

POLI 383, National Security, 3 Units

This course addresses the definition and pursuit of national security by means of a thorough-going review of essential offices and institutions, assessing the relevant policymaking process, exploring principles of strategic theory, and defining symmetric and asymmetric security threats.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or instructor's consent

POLI 385, Politics of Developing Countries, 3 Units

This course considers the governmental structures and political orientation of developing countries and the essential theories devised respecting their political past, present, and future.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

POLI 390, History and Politics of the Non-Western World, 3 Units

This course offers an overview of historical and political patterns in one pre-announced selected area of the non-Western developing world. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies.

POLI 399, Political Science Practicum, 1-8 Units

This practicum gives credit for field work in an area chosen by the student. The American Studies Program (See Center for Global Learning & Engagement) and the University of California, Davis' Capitol Campus Program offer internship opportunities in Washington, DC, and Sacramento. Other local opportunities include government agencies, political parties, and political campaign organizations. Up to 8 units may be earned. Only 6 units are counted toward the political science major and 3 units toward the political science minor. All other units count as elective credits.

POLI 400, Seminar on American Politics, 3 Units

This course facilitates inquiry into one pre-announced aspect of American politics, such as political parties, voting behavior, or interest groups. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor's consent

POLI 405, The American Presidency, 3 Units

This course presents an overview of the American presidency, including the historical development of the presidency, contributions of individual presidents to the executive office, presidential authority and politics in the modern era, the presidential election process, and the role of the executive branch.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor's consent

POLI 410, Congress, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of the functioning of Congress as an institution. Topics include the historical evolution of Congress, changes in internal rules and procedures that guide congressional action, the role of Congress within the federal system, and external influences on the legislative process.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor's consent

POLI 415, The Federal Judiciary, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of the federal judicial system, with particular attention given to the power and function of the U.S. Supreme Court, methods of constitutional interpretation, judicial selection, and the role of the judiciary in the constitutional system of government.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor's consent

POLI 420, Women in Politics, 3 Units

This course examines women's participation in public office at the local, regional, national, and international levels and explores potential differences between men and women in the areas of campaigning and political leadership, policy preferences, and governing styles.

Prerequisites: POLI 150

POLI 421, Regional Studies, 3 Units

This course is a comparative political analysis of a specific global region (e.g., Middle East, Eastern Europe, East Asia, Central America, etc.), with empirical emphases on the region's political history, forms of government, security problems, and cultural dynamics. As regions covered will vary, the course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or instructor's consent

POLI 422, International Organizations, 3 Units

This course examines the variety of modern international organizations, and their respective missions and operations. Organizations with legal, security, economic, health, civil-society, and judicial portfolios are considered.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or instructor's consent

POLI 450, Principles and Practice of Research Design, 3 Units

This course presents a fundamental overview of the principles and practice of political science research design. Topics include introduction to scientific inquiry, research design construction, ethical principles, modes of observation, types of data analysis, and reading and writing social research.

Prerequisites: POLI 300 or Upper Division Writing Intensive Course

POLI 471, Political Topics, 1-8 Units

Subject matter for this course varies and may include topics in political theory, American government, and international affairs. Possible topics include: nuclear arms, religion and politics, and presidential elections. POLI 271 and POLI 471 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in POLI 471. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Up to eight units may be earned for participation in seminars offered by the American Studies Program (See Center for Global Learning & Engagement).

POLI 496, Senior Seminar: Religion and Politics, 3 Units

This seminar focuses on the ethical, political, and historical implications of ideas both in their historical context and in contemporary society. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, completion of the majority of the units required for God's Word and the Christian Response, and upper-division writing intensive course.

POLI 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

POLI 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

POLI 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, electronic media, or artistic creation of a material form. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisites: upper-division writing intensive course completed or instructor's permission; and junior or senior standing.

Faculty

Chair

Daniel C. Palm, Political Science, Ph.D.

Professor

Daniel C. Palm, Political Science, Ph.D.

Christopher Flannery, Political Science, Ph.D.

Diane Guido, History, Ph.D.

Bryan Lamkin, History, Ph.D.

Edmund Mazza, History, Ph.D.

Jennifer E. Walsh, Political Science, Ph.D.

David Weeks, Political Science, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Verónica Gutiérrez, History, MFA, Ph.D.

Bradley Hale, History, Ph.D.

Abbylin Sellers, Political Science, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Douglas Hume, Political Science, J.D.

Joshua King, Political Science, Ph.D.

David Lambert, History, MBA, Ph.D.

Ethan Schrum, History, Ph.D.

Adjunct Faculty

Laura Brantley, M.A.

Wade Harrington, M.A.

Michael Hestrin, J.D.

Chris Jennings, J.D.

Dong-wook Lee, Ph.D.

Kenneth Leonardo, M.A.

Stephen Nelson, M.A.

Brian Plummer, Ph.D.