Department of Global Studies, Sociology, and TESOL

Department Overview

The Department of Global Studies, Sociology, and TESOL supports two majors: global studies and sociology. The department also supports three minors: global studies, sociology, and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). For program descriptions, view the Undergraduate Programs tab and select the appropriate major or minor.

TESOL Graduate Programs

The Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), and the TEFL and TESOL Certificate programs, are described in the Graduate and Professional Catalog.

GLBL 101, Self-Directed Language Learning I, 4 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence designed as an individually tailored, self-directed course for developing elementary competence in the language and culture of a foreign speech community, typically within study abroad contexts. Two semesters of the same language are required to meet the General Education requirement.

GLBL 102, Self-Directed Language Learning II, 4 Units

A continuation of GLBL 101, this is an individually tailored, self-directed course for developing low-intermediate competence in the language and culture of a foreign speech community. Two semesters of the same language are required to meet the General Education requirement.

Prerequisite: GLBL 101

GLBL 120, Contemporary Global Issues, 3 Units

Focusing on cities in the Majority World, this course introduces key concepts in global studies. Global issues are surveyed and analyzed, such as urbanization, income inequality, environment degradation, conflict and migration; and cultural, economic, and political causes are discussed. Drawing on research in sociology, global urbanism, and sustainable development, students consider contributing factors and assess prospects for constructive global engagement. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

GLBL 201, Anthropology for Everyday Life, 3 Units

Anthropology for Everyday Life aims to equip us with a practical methodology for exploring the social and cultural reality of group members within local communities through the development of cross-cultural relationships combined with reflection on anthropological concepts and experiences. Students prepare to enter relationships of mutual learning with peoples throughout the world. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

GLBL 260, Intercultural Communication, 3 Units

The course explores the dynamic processes of establishing a relationship between culturally diverse individuals. Respecting divergent cultural patterns is promoted, but not at the expense of salient spiritual, moral, and ethical issues involved in intercultural communication. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

GLBL 300, Self-Directed Language Learning, 3 Units

The course provides an individually tailored, community-based program for developing proficiency in a foreign language. Emphasis is placed on intensive listening and speaking practice to facilitate full participation in family, study, research, and service activities in a foreign culture. This option is offered only for language courses not taught on campus or for participants of the Global Learning Term Program.

GLBL 305, Peoples and Places, 3 Units

This seminar prepares students for their Global Learning Term or other study abroad experiences through focused area study via a combination of library searches, directed reading, and learning contract development.

GLBL 315, Urban Society, 3 Units

This course connects students with the people, problems, and prospects of greater Los Angeles. It provides the foundation for understanding urban values and beliefs in historical context, exposure to urban systems, the application of global perspectives, and the collaborative exploration of solutions. Course is available only through the L.A. Term. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

GLBL 318, Immigration and Integration, 3 Units

An introduction to immigration in the United States, its recent history, theories, and legal aspects, with attention to the integration of immigrant communities into the socio-economic fabric of Los Angeles and beyond. The course addresses the present state of the national immigration debate and encourages students to apply and integrate their faith perspectives on the issues. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: GLBL 315

GLBL 320, Global Engagement in the 21st Century, 3 Units

This course studies contemporary global issues and draws extensively from social documentaries (DVDs), biblical texts, students' intercultural experiences, and contemporary models of community-based engagement.

Prerequisite: Participation in L.A. Term or Instructor's consent

GLBL 325, Family Organization, 3 Units

Students immerse themselves in the daily life of host families and communities in crosscultural settings where they explore unfamiliar assumptions and norms of behavior as the basis for composing a family ethnography. Course is only available through the Global Learning Term.

Prerequisite: GLBL 305

GLBL 330, Community Transformation, 6 Units

This course offers a formal and experiential study of the transformation of urban, multicultural communities with the goal of developing a service ethic through a semester-long internship. It involves directed reading, reflective papers, a service practicum, and group discussions- aimed at both the transformation of the student community and the wider Los Angeles community. Course is available only through the L.A. Term Program.

GLBL 335, Global Internship, 6 Units

The Global Internship is an extended, structured service experience within a cross-cultural setting addressing community-identified needs. Students work under expert supervision for a minimum of 150 hours, integrating disciplinary study with direct interaction and personal reflection and writing. The course aims to improve students' global knowledge and intercultural competence, while guiding them in making a modest contribution to community improvement. Course is only available through the Global Learning Term (GLT) program.

Prerequisite: GLBL 305

GLBL 340, Community Life, 3 Units

This field seminar helps students learn how to experience another culture. Students explore several topics (e.g., art, schooling, group relations, music, folklore, politics, etc.) of a chosen country, city, or people through observation and discovery, local event participation, informant interviews, problem solving, and journal keeping. Course is only available through the Global Learning Term.

GLBL 345, Urban Religious Movements, 3 Units

This course contains a survey of religious movements in Los Angeles, including Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Orthodox Christianity, Judaism, and New Age. Emphasis is placed on the vernacular character of their faith, embodied and expressed in the beliefs, attitudes, practices, and rituals of their specific social and cultural situations. Learning activities include participant-observation at religious services, informant interviewing, directed reading, and group discussion. Course is available only through the L.A. Term.

GLBL 350, Writing 3: Global Study Project, 3 Units

Students carry out a self-designed study/research project within an intercultural setting on topics of public concern. The course provides conceptual and practical tools for designing the inquiry under the combined direction of an academic advisor and an on-site guide. Course is only available through the Global Learning Term (GLT) program. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2 and GLBL305

GLBL 355, Principles and Practice of Community Engagement, 3 Units

This course introduces students to foundations and principles of community development. With in-class learning from real-world case materials, principles are explored and applied in practice during a three-to-four-week service-learning field project/internship with a local nongovernmental organization (NGO) or development organization that addresses community need(s). This course is offered only in international programs. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

GLBL 365, Women and Globalization, 3 Units

This course critically examines the relationship between women and globalization. Globalization is analyzed from an historical perspective focusing on its antecedents in capitalism and modernity. While drawing from the fields of economics, history, and political science, this class examines the intersection of women and globalization primarily from an anthropological and global perspective. Topics to be read, discussed, and analyzed include capitalism, globalization, development, transnational migration, labor, media, the environment, and religion.

GLBL 399, Global Seminar, 3 Units

This is a short-term, collaboratively led study and service seminar focused on a vital global issue in an international setting. The course enlightens learners' disciplinary perspectives, develops their intercultural competence, and strengthens their commitment to serve "the least, the last, and the lost" throughout their lives. It includes three on-campus class sessions prior to a 10-day field seminar.

GLBL 420, Sustainable Societies, 3 Units

Sustainable Societies is a seminar-style upper-division and applied course focused on creating communities that are socially equitable, economically expansive, culturally adaptive, and ecologically sustainable. Practical themes in the "sustainability conversation" are linked to cross-cultural field experiences and post-college vocational planning. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing

GLBL 425, Integration and Formation Seminar, 1 Unit

Integration and Formation takes students through the process of integrating their study away experiences with their spiritual, ethical, and vocational development. It provides study away returnees with the opportunity to analyze their experiences with others while understanding the process of negotiating changing cultural norms to become ethical and responsible global learners. May be taken for 0 units by petition only.

Prerequisite: Completed Study Away Program or Instructor consent. Instructor or department consent must be obtained to drop course.

GLBL 465, Globalization and Development, 3 Units

A brief historical perspective on globalization is presented, focusing on the transitions from premercantilism to industrialization to the world today. Economic, political, and social perspectives on the structural changes associated with globalization today are discussed, along with the major challenges and opportunities concerning globalization as it relates to the poor.

Prerequisite: GLBL 201

GLBL 495, Special Topics, 3 Units

This course addresses topics of current interest in Global Studies not covered in-depth by the core and elective Global Studies courses. Possible topics include: women and global human rights, urbanization and global poverty, global health issues, humanitarian aid and relief, global ethics, and specific areas within larger topics of global systems, issues, and inequity. Course may be repeated as the topic varies up to 9 units, or three times.

Prerequisite: GLBL 301

GLBL 496, Global Studies Senior Seminar, 3 Units

Major global issues and trends are examined so as to frame possible Christian social interventions in response to some of the moral and ethical challenges of today. Students prepare and present a formal project report.

Prerequisite: Senior standing, GLBL 201, or Instructor's consent, completion of the majority of God's Word requirement, and upper-division writing intensive course.

GLBL 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

Consists of a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class. May be repeated for credit.

GLBL 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

GLBL 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no less than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, electronic media, or artistic creation of a material form. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: upper-division writing intensive course completed or instructor's permission; and junior or senior standing.

SOC 120, Introduction to Sociology, 3 Units

This course focuses on the origins and development of sociology as a response to pressing social problems. It emphasizes mastery of sociological terminology. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

SOC 120H, Introduction to Sociology - Honors, 3 Units

This course focuses on the origins and development of sociology as a response to pressing social problems. It emphasizes mastery of sociological terminology. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

SOC 225, Contemporary Social Problems, 3 Units

The complex social problems faced by people in a changing technological society are studied. Institutions, attempts to find solutions, and exploration of alternatives are emphasized.

SOC 230, Comparative Family Systems, 3 Units

This course compares traditional family patterns with the new options available to men and women, both as individuals and partners. It focuses on the changing roles of men and women inside and outside of marriage, the challenge of the two-career family, and the search for the family's place as an integral part of society.

SOC 298, Basic Sociological Theory, 3 Units

The function of theory and the contributions to modern sociological thought by the principal sociologists of the 19th and 20th centuries are considered. The application of theory to contemporary social concerns is investigated.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

SOC 358, Human Diversity, 3 Units

Students examine diversity in a pluralistic society, with a focus on groups that have been assigned subordinate positions because of race, religion, country of origin, disability, age, language, or gender. The nature of prejudice and issues related to discrimination and oppression are explored. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

SOC 359, Immigrant L.A., 3 Units

This course focuses on the social dimensions of immigration into Southern California. "Likeness" and "otherness" are examined in relation to race/ethnicity, transnationality, global inequality, and citizenship. Macrosocial and economic forces, along with governmental policies are analyzed and critiqued. In-depth stories of immigrants and various site visits contribute to students' experiential learning on the subject.

SOC 360, Sociology of Religion, 3 Units

This course offers an objective analysis of the interrelations between religious phenomena and social institutions, structures, and behavior. There is special emphasis on the distinction between church and sect, religious and social stratification, secularization, science and religion, and religious movements.

SOC 361, Education and Society, 3 Units

This course introduces the Sociology of Education, examining the relationship between schooling and the larger society. Taking a comparative and historical perspective on education as a social institution, the course examines major issues in the field, concentrating on the role of education in cultural transmission, socialization, and performance- as well as the use of education in legitimating social inequality and transmitting morals and values. The course also explores the structure of educational systems as institutional bureaucracies and organizations. Students apply their learning in a scholarly sociological analysis of a current educational policy or practice.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

SOC 404, Community, 3 Units

Students examine the various ways people organize themselves into communities and develop means of governance. This course explores the impact of the community on people, the ways power is used and misused, social conflict, social change, and the need for social involvement. A wide variety of communities are examined: rural, urban, village, metropolis, Utopian communities, communes, planned cities, and new towns. Cultural and national differences in the development of communities are assessed.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

SOC 405, The Sociology of Gender, 3 Units

This course in an investigation of gender and sex roles, primarily in American culture and society. The course explores the ways in which society shapes notions of what it means to be a "woman" and a "man" by examining the theories and research on how people define themselves and interact with others in a variety of contexts (e.g., family, personal relationships, work, health, religion, etc.). It also examines the sociological implications of cultural definitions of femininity and masculinity as seen through various racial, historical, economic, and sexualized perspectives

Prerequisite: SOC 120 or SOC 358, and Junior or Senior Standing.

SOC 425, Social Movements, 3 Units

Students undertake several analytical tasks in this course such as understanding how and why social movements emerge, what strategies are used to maintain the movement, how collective identity develops, and what makes a social movement successful. Students look to contemporary social movements to respond to these queries.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

SOC 455, Crime and Delinquency, 3 Units

This course explores the dimensions and nature of both traditional crime and criminality and the newly recognized forms of crime which exist within contemporary society. The criminal's relationship to the courts, police, and other penal agencies is the focus of attention.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

SOC 464, Social Stratification, 3 Units

Theories and research in social stratification are the focus of this course. Topics covered include role, status, structure of differential rankings in society, criteria for ranking, functions and dysfunction, correlates of class positions, social change, and social mobility.

SOC 468, Contemporary Social Theory, 3 Units

This course looks at major theoretical orientations in contemporary sociological thought, explores the ways these ideas have changed in relation to the structural transformations, and examines connections between the underlying assumptions of key theorists and their conclusions about the nature of social life.

Prerequisites: SOC 120, SOC 298

SOC 471, Qualitative Social Research Methods, 3 Units

This basic course in social scientific research focuses on qualitative methods. Students gain experience with participant observation, intensive interviewing, and other field methods. Qualitative research design, data collection, data analysis, and research report writing are covered. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: SOC 120 and SOC 298

SOC 472, Quantitative Social Research Methods, 3 Units

This basic course in social scientific research focuses on quantitative methods. Students gain experience with survey research, content analysis, and other statistical methods. Quantitative research design, data collection, data analysis, and research report writing are covered.

Prerequisite: MATH 130 (B grade or better)

SOC 495, Special Topics, 3 Units

This course addresses topics of current interest in sociology not covered by the core and elective sociology courses. Possible topics include: the sociology of sports, media, or fashion, and specific areas within such larger topics as gender, race, class and religion. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies.

Prerequisites: SOC 120, SOC 298

SOC 496, Senior Seminar: Faith and Social Issues, 3 Units

Students investigate the impact of modernity on family life, work, religion, politics, and the arts, and consider questions such as: how can people create and preserve a morally coherent life in a society that is pluralistic, secular, and privatized? What difference does Christian faith make in the way people understand the world, and in determining how people ought to live?

Prerequisites: SOC 358, senior standing, completion of the majority of the units required for God's Word and the Christian Response, and completion of the majority of course work in the major, and upper- division writing intensive course

SOC 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This course consists of a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

TESL 100, Academic English for Multilingual Undergraduates, 4 Units

Academic English for Multilingual Undergraduates prepares multilingual undergraduate students for three primary academic language tasks of undergraduate study - academic writing, presentations, and seminar speaking. The course focuses on both written and spoken academic English. To the extent possible, assignments will be tied to the students' undergraduate coursework. This course is taken prior to WRIT 110.

TESL 101, English for Academic Purposes I, 4 Units

This is an advanced level English language course designed to prepare international students for the cultural and academic realm of speaking and listening at an undergraduate level in an American university. Students put into practice the communication skills used at an American university by getting involved in and observing social contexts in and around the university campus, and by emulating and discussing in class many of the situations in which these skills take place. In addition, students will examine American values which influence and determine the use of listening and speaking for communication in American culture. For international students only; to be taken concurrently with TESL 102.

TESL 102, English for Academic Purposes II, 4 Units

This is an advanced level English language course designed for students who speak English as a second language. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing skills used within academic settings. These skills include interacting with a text, reading for information, paraphrasing, summarizing, expressing an opinion, writing essays, and documenting papers using academic citations. For international students only; to be taken concurrently with TESL 101.

TESL 456, Teaching Practicum, 3 Units

Student teachers engage in practice teaching and are observed by mentor teachers. Through short debriefing sessions, they are guided into a discovery of their teaching behaviors and alternative ways of achieving desired results.

Faculty

Department Chair

Richard Robison, Ph.D., TESOL

Professors

Paul Hertig, Ph.D., Global Studies

Carrie Peirce, Ph.D., Sociology

Richard Robison, Ph.D., TESOL

Richard Slimbach, Ph.D., Global Studies

Mary Wong, Ph.D., TESOL

Professor Emeritus

Richard Christopherson, Sociology, Ph.D.

Associate Professors

Grace Bahng, Ph.D., Global Studies

Tasha Bleistein, Ph.D., TESOL

Nori Henk, Ph.D., Sociology

David Miyahara, Ph.D., Sociology

Adjunct Faculty

CyBelle Barthelmess, M.A., Global Studies

Erik Aasland, Ph.D., Global Studies

Heather Castle, M.A., Global Studies

Kathleen Chuman, M.A., Global Studies

Young Lee Hertig, Ph.D., Global Studies

Eunice Hong, Ph.D., Global Studies

Melanie Kawana-Chiu, M.A., Global Studies

Dolores Ortiz, M.A., Sociology

Teresa Ubovich, M.A., Sociology

Tara Wawelo, M.A., Global Studies

Gustavo Zdanovich, M.A., Global Studies