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Accreditation

Azusa Pacific University programs are accredited by the WASC Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC).

Admission

University graduate admission and program acceptance requirements must be met before an application is complete (see Admission to the University). Program-specific application requirements are available online.

International applicants should contact the International Center first at +1-626-812-3055 or international@apu.edu.

Learn more about the University Libraries.

EDUC 501, Language Structure and Use, 3 Units

This course explores the structures of English used in communicating meaning, theoretically sound models of second-language learning and teaching, and the distinctive factors which affect first- and second-language acquisition. Requirements include gathering oral and written language examples and a mini-case study of a second-language learner.

EDUC 502, Foundations of Literacy Development and Content Instruction for English Learners, 3 Units

This course examines models and methods of bilingual education and explores theories and methods of teaching in and through English as a second language for limited-English-proficient students in grades K-12. The course presents basic approaches to assessing language and content area development of bilingual students.

EDUC 503, Practical Approaches and Methods to Literacy Development for English Learners, 3 Units

This course offers collaborative opportunities to pursue classroom-based action plans for testing adaptations in learning conditions and teaching strategies for English language development students. Students explore approaches in Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) across the curriculum with second-language learners.

EDUC 504, Teaching and Cultural Diversity, 3 Units

This course focuses on a reflective examination of the interaction of several variables which affect educational success and failure for students who are linguistically and culturally different: the students' cultural background, including ethnic, racial, religious, and gender issues; the school's cultural format of an educational setting; and the social forces in the wider community. The underlying assumption of the course is that the achievement of equity and maintenance of cultural diversity in pluralistic democracies are not only desirable goals, but also necessary for political unity, social stability, and sustained economic development. The educational system plays a critical role in nurturing multiculturalism, creating instructional environments which encourage tolerance and praise for cultural diversity, and honoring cultural differences as assets rather than deficiencies. Educators have a moral and civic responsibility to ensure that multicultural attitudes and values permeate the total school curriculum and learning environment. Students study the nature of culture and learn to appreciate the strong influence that a student's culture has on learning behavior and values. They also develop ways to uncover more aspects of cultural diversity among their students and evaluate culturally appropriate responses and strategies which enhance learning opportunities.

EDUC 505, Advanced Literacy Development, 3 Units

This course explores exemplary models of literacy development for elementary and secondary level students who are advancing in their reading and writing processes and learning to value narrative, informational, and poetic language uses across a widening range of literacy functions. Students examine and experience process-sensitive approaches to readers' and writers' workshops, book sharing circles, writing across the curriculum, content-area reading, and other structured formats which engage maturing readers/writers more fully in using written language to construct meaning in their lives. Included in the course are investigations into multiple literacies, reflective self-assessment, cross-age literacy programs, and other social, collaborative contexts for literacy growth.

EDUC 507, Family, Community, and School Connections, 3 Units

This course focuses on community dynamics, community building, and parent involvement as essential components in education. Students engage in utilizing asset-based community building strategies in educational practice as they map their school communities, conduct capacity inventories, and develop action plans for parent/community involvement. Students also discuss and define their role in building strong partnerships with all families, especially those in low-income communities of color. Successful school reform models of parent involvement are examined along with their connection to higher student achievement.

EDUC 508, Assessment and Evaluation in Multicultural Classrooms, 3 Units

This course reviews the uses, demands, and limitations of formal, standardized testing practices and embraces assessment of 21st Century Skills. Students explore informal observational assessment, student self-assessment, parental involvement, portfolios, criterion- and performance-based assessment, and assessing critical thinking, creativity, citizenship, collaboration, and problem-solving. The course also provides an introduction to Smarter Balanced Assessment protocols. Finally, students explore ways to assess and improve their own instructional programs and teaching.

EDUC 509, Special Topics in Education, 3 Units

Students study specific current topics, trends, technologies, or innovative programs in the field of bilingual/English language development. The course covers theoretical and practical aspects of issues related to new problems or new possibilities for improving and enhancing language, literacy, or academic learning opportunities for bilingual students.

EDUC 511, Essentials in Learning and Technology, 1 Unit

This course focuses on introducing and developing proficiency with the essential skills necessary for the Master of Arts in Education: Learning & Technology emphasis. Students utilize a variety of applications and skills necessary for competency in the program. This course must be taken in the first term of the program.

EDUC 512, Instructional Applications of Productivity Software, 3 Units

Students take the functional knowledge of productivity software and learn how to implement its use in instruction and projects including a final thematic project into their own classroom. The projects are designed to match the California State Content Standards and ISTE NETS standards of their own grade, and are appropriate for the technology environment in which the project will be implemented.

EDUC 513, Digital-age Literacies, 3 Units

Information, communication, and technological (ICT) literacies provide the foundation for effective classroom technology integration. The knowledge, skills, and applications explored in this course prepare students to access, organize, and communicate beyond traditional classroom practices through the use of Web 2.0 technologies for more engaging instructional experiences.

EDUC 514, Digital Video in the Classroom, 3 Units

Students are exposed to basics in video project composition. Activities include learning how to build visually effective shots, how to use music to enhance the feel of the presentation, and how to create a movie project that is designed to keep a student's attention in the context of teaching standards-based material.

EDUC 515, Evolving Educational Technologies, 3 Units

This course looks at the evolution of educational technologies in their present and historical contexts. Students explore how and why some technologies endure while others do not. Attention is given to current technologies and how they can be successfully implemented into the classrooms in order to enhance both teaching and learning strategies.

EDUC 517, Digital Imaging in the Classroom, 3 Units

This course covers the basic operating concepts of digital imaging software, an essential component for creating quality video and Web-based products. Working through several projects, students learn how to create, design, manipulate, and alter images that can be integrated into digital products. Supporting hardware used in digital imaging such as cameras, scanners, and printers are also explored.

EDUC 518, Connecting with Global Learning Communities, 3 Units

This course focuses on the use of technology to make connections with global learning communities in order to strengthen cultural, environmental, and sociopolitical understanding. Students engage their own classrooms in global learning projects as a vehicle to promote cross-cultural literacy, a necessary skill for the global workforce and 21st century.

EDUC 519, Document Design for the Classroom, 3 Units

Students learn how to use the power and flexibility of document design software to enhance their teaching environment. To accomplish this, students familiarize themselves with document design terminology and learn how to use document design software in classroom-based scenarios. Students also develop methods to use document design tools to facilitate classroom teaching and learning.

EDUC 520, Creating Web Media, 3 Units

This course explores the use of Web-based technologies in an educational context. The class focuses on the implementation of these technologies successfully in the classroom. Attention is in the areas of audio and video podcasting as well as developing strong collaboration between students using Web 2.0 technologies. Open to Educational Technology and Learning students only.

EDUC 522, Learning in the 21st Century, 3 Units

Working with digital natives requires an understanding of how they acquire and process information. This course assists educators in bridging the gap between static curriculum and multi-model instruction. A key component of this course is designing unit plans that embed technology and differentiated instruction with a focus on multiple intelligences and learning styles to meet the needs of today's learners.

EDUC 523, Hypermedia-enhanced Learning Environments, 3 Units

The basics of hypermedia are studied, and students are introduced to an authoring program. Topics include mechanics of the program and their use for the development of class presentations, computer-assisted instruction (CAI), and multimedia projects. Integration of hypermedia with school curricula is emphasized. Students learn how to develop multimedia in conjunction with increasing the creativity, impact, and effectiveness of their presentation skills.

EDUC 524, Curriculum Design and Delivery, 3 Units

This course engages students in the instructional design process for developing and delivering effective learning experiences in the classroom. In collaboration with classmates, students create technology-enhanced curricula with written justification of design decisions.

EDUC 525, Web Design for the Classroom, 3 Units

Students learn and apply the educational uses of Web design. Emphasis is placed on making website design a teaching and learning tool. Effective design is accentuated in the course and is assessed by usability tests.

EDUC 526, Capstone Experience in Learning and Technology, 2 Units

The primary focus of this capstone experience is a research-designed multimedia eportfolio that showcases skills and concepts the student has acquired in the Master of Arts in Education: Learning & Technology program. This capstone course incorporates each student's research, use of applied technologies in learning and technology, a growth assessment, a comprehensive eportfolio and defense. This course must be taken at the end of the program, and passed in order to meet the final requirements for the master's degree.

EDUC 527, Emerging Topics in Educational Technology and Learning, 3 Units

The current technologies, trends, or topics in educational technology and learning are explored. The course covers practical and theoretical aspects, effectiveness, and problems related to the implementation of the topic into classroom and school instructional practices. Different topics may be taken and repeated for credit.

EDUC 530, Introduction to Research for Practitioners, 1 Unit

This introductory course enables master's degree candidates to develop an understanding of the research process by introducing the basic principles of research and academic writing. Candidates identify the elements of high-quality empirical work, compare qualitative and quantitative methods, and understand research design issues. Through activities integrating theory with practice, students learn how to locate, value, and synthesize other relevant research, identify ethical usage, and utilize appropriate formatting.

EDUC 536, Family, Community, and School Connections, 3 Units

This course focuses on community dynamics, community building, and parental involvement as essential components in education. Successful school reform models of parental involvement are examined, along with their connection to higher student achievement. Master's degree candidates discuss and define their role in building strong partnerships with all families, especially those in underserved communities. They utilize asset-based community building strategies in educational practice as they explore their school communities and conduct capacity inventories. Candidates develop an ethnography representing their deepening understanding of who their students are, how the families and communities in which they are embedded help shape them, and how they can utilize this knowledge to enhance holistic development of students through their practice.

EDUC 537, Curriculum Development, Revision, and Evaluation Process, 3 Units

This course applies a systems approach to curriculum design through examining the phases of the process, including analysis, design, development, and evaluation. Master's degree candidates are introduced to keys of effective curriculum design, including setting goals and developing clear and measurable objectives; determining related learning activities and resources to promote learning and accomplish objectives; designing and/or selecting appropriate forms of assessment (formative and summative) to chart student progress; and using multiple forms of feedback for assessing instructional effectiveness, to inform future modifications and revisions. Students learn the purpose of and approach to each phase of the instructional design process and create products for each phase in completing a curriculum design project.

EDUC 538, Current Issues in Education, 3 Units

In this course, master's degree candidates investigate, analyze, discuss, and propose solutions for the most significant problems, concerns, and challenges in education today. The course includes four areas of concentration: curriculum with a focus on instructional design, teaching practice, school organization, and the politics of education. Candidates study current research relevant to course topics, analyze varying perspectives, and evaluate them in terms of teaching and learning effectiveness as well as the quality of life in the school community. Through compilation and synthesis of empirical work on a specific topic area, candidates craft a literature review to demonstrate expertise in current trends and future directions of research.

EDUC 539, Capstone Seminar, 2 Units

Culminating the M.A. completer courses, the capstone seminar builds on the coursework representing students' repertoire of academic preparation throughout the credential and master's programs. Master's candidates create and compile assignments in an efolio profiling their professional identities (personal philosophy, identity and dispositions narrative), their scholarly work (ethnography, curriculum assessment, literature review), and their practical applications (lesson and unit plans, classroom management) in the classroom. This seminar refines and contributes further to a body of work representing the teacher candidate's accomplishments and professional identity. Finally, candidates enhance their understanding and experience of a community's connection to the school environment.

Prerequisites: All prior emphasis courses.

EDUC 540, Essentials in Learning and Technology, 1 Unit

This course focuses on introducing and developing proficiency with the essential skills necessary for the Master of Arts in Education: Learning and Technology emphasis. Students utilize a variety of applications and skills necessary for competency in the program. This course must be taken in the first term of the program.

EDUC 541, Emerging Literacy, K-12, 3 Units

This course focuses on the emerging literacy needs of K-12 students who are at beginning or minimal levels of processing reading and writing effectively for meaning, including English language learners with distinct literacy development needs. Students examine sound socio-psycholinguistic insights into the nature and development of reading and writing processes and explore the critical conditions that help learners become more strategic, self-aware readers and writers. Included in the course are investigations into structuring balanced literacy experiences, guided reading and writing, literacy-enriched environments, quality reading materials, meaningful records of growth, and other practices which increase students' pleasure, value, and success in their literate lives.

EDUC 542, Bilingual Methods for Primary Language Instruction, 3 Units

This course covers bilingual instructional strategies for teaching in students' primary language and English. Students review procedures for selecting, adapting, and using primary language materials; they also evaluate the effectiveness and relevancy of such materials for students.

EDUC 544, Educational Equity and Cultural Diversity in a Pluralistic Society, 3 Units

The focus of this course is a reflective examination of several variables affecting educational success and failure for students who are linguistically, culturally, and economically different, as well as the special needs students. These variables include ethnicity, race, religion, exceptionality, language, socio-economic status, geographical region, and sexual orientation issues. It addresses the school's cultural format of an educational setting, and the social forces in the wider community, all of which impact students' ability to learn. Teacher candidates develop ways to uncover more aspects of cultural diversity among their students and evaluate culturally appropriate response strategies that enhance learning opportunities. The underlying assumption of the course is that the achievement of equity and maintenance of cultural diversity in pluralistic democracies are not only desirable goals, but also necessary for political unity, social stability, and sustained economic development.

EDUC 546, Digital Communications, 3 Units

This course engages students in collaborative, investigative, and reflective learning opportunities through the exploration of relevant digital communication tools. Attention is given to current modes of communication that utilize a digital platform, and effective strategies for implementation within teaching/learning environments.

EDUC 547, Special Topics in Educational Technology, 3 Units

The current technologies, trends, and a variety of special topics, in educational technology are explored. This course covers practical and theoretical aspects, effectiveness, and problems related to the implementation of the topic into relevant teaching/learning environments. Different topics may be taken and repeated for credit.

EDUC 548, Emerging Trends in Technology, 3 Units

This course covers the historical development of educational technology and the social issues influencing its growth and implementation. Attention is also given to a synthesis of research related to the field, professional organizations serving the discipline, and emerging innovative uses of educational technology.

EDUC 549, Capstone Experience in Learning and Technology, 2 Units

The primary focus of this capstone experience is a research-designed multimedia eportfolio that showcases skills and concepts the student has acquired in the Master of Arts in Education: Learning and Technology program. This course incorporates each student's research, use of applied technologies in learning and technology, a growth assessment, a comprehensive eportfolio, and defense. The course must be taken at the end of the program, and passed in order to meet the final requirements for the master's degree.

EDUC 550, Introduction to Research for Practitioners, 1 Unit

This introductory course enables master's degree candidates to develop an understanding of the research process by introducing the basic principles of research and academic writing. Candidates identify the elements of high-quality empirical work, compare qualitative and quantitative methods, and come to understand research design issues. Through activities integrating theory with practice, students learn how to locate, value, and synthesize other relevant research, identify ethical usage, and utilize appropriate formatting.

EDUC 554, Instructional Principles and Practices, 3 Units

This course examines ways teachers can more effectively organize time, space, resources, students, and activities that embody standards of sound practices while creating a strong sense of community collaboration among learners and genuinely student-centered classrooms. Course investigations focus on integrative units, grouping strategies, multiple modes of learning representation, workshop formats, reflective assessment, and other promising approaches which nurture motivation and inquiry and provide authentic learning experiences for culturally, academically, and linguistically diverse students.

EDUC 555, Comparative Education: A Global Perspective, 3 Units

This course examines the philosophical, theoretical, and practical basis of educational systems across the world: organization, administration, policy, and practice. The roles of education practitioners, students, parents, and community members are discussed. Students also examine the role of nation-states in developing educational systems and the mission of education in global societies.

EDUC 556, Historical and Philosophical Perspectives of Disability Studies, 3 Units

This course explores and analyzes the historically key definitions of disability in light of the major theories, methodological approaches, and proposed public policy uses that have shaped them. It also considers how civil rights, human rights, self-determination, social policy, and participative action research have influenced disability studies. A diverse set of current and historical research articles on disability studies is analyzed to model the ways in which different research topics have been addressed and introduce how current research can stimulate future studies. Emphasis is given to the formulation of important research questions and the development of testable hypotheses based on previous theory, literature, and experience, as master's candidates begin to develop initial sections of their capstone research project.

EDUC 557, Current Trends in Curriculum and Disability Studies, 3 Units

This course explores and analyzes current key definitions of disability in light of the major theories, methodological approaches, and proposed public policy uses that shape them, and investigates current issues related to curriculum and instruction, alongside discussion of trends in supervision, administration, and teacher education. A diverse set of current research articles in disability studies is analyzed to provide examples and raise questions about how different research topics are being addressed. Emphasis is given to the importance of research design in providing valid and reliable results that enhance knowledge in developing the design of each student's capstone research project.

EDUC 558, Guided Research Project, 3 Units

This advanced course enables master's degree candidates in special education to become informed users and designers of educational research. Building upon earlier courses, candidates continue to examine educational research within the special education framework, with an emphasis on consumption, design, and application. Through activities integrated with their own inquiry processes, candidates refine their ability to locate, value, and synthesize relevant research, as well as select and employ appropriate research approaches, procedures, data sources, and analytical methods. Using these skills, candidates incorporate the sections drafted in previous research core courses to develop and implement a cohesive, data-driven research plan for their own classroom or school-based inquiry, using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods approaches, as appropriate. Standards for writing research papers are also highlighted. Candidates complete the capstone project and submit findings in the Procedures and Findings section.

EDUC 559, Procedures and Findings, 2 Units

This course is a sequel to the Guided Research Project section, and is designed to help researcher-educators develop the capstone reporting processes and procedures sections, as well as to refine and submit the completed project. Candidates continue to examine educational research within the special education framework. Through quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods, candidates incorporate all pieces developed in previous research core courses and implement, analyze, and report findings for their data-driven research plan. Candidates work independently, provide feedback to and receive feedback from peers, and hold conference with their instructor to review their data analyses and results, and to effectively revise and edit their completed project. This course enables candidates to complete their own research inquiry process and submit a final research report.

Prerequisites: All prior emphasis courses

EDUC 571, Curriculum Foundations, 3 Units

This master's degree core course is designed to prepare candidates with both a practical and theoretical understanding of curriculum in schooling. The course offers a study of the various approaches of curriculum construction and organization in the schools by examining the principles of curriculum improvement, change, and evaluation. The focus is on the theories, research, and best practices related to planning and developing curriculum and its implementation in schools and classrooms in order to address the needs of students in diverse communities.

EDUC 572, Advanced Educational Psychology, 3 Units

Professional educators apply the latest research findings of contemporary psychologists and educational pedagogies to the challenges of classroom motivation, classroom management, individual differences, learning styles, and evaluation modes. P-12 human development and brain-based learning are incorporated in this course. An emphasis of this course is applying theories into practice.

EDUC 573, Philosophy/Ethics and History of Education, 3 Units

This course is a survey of the historical and philosophical ideas that guide educational theory and practice. Emphasis is on ethical clarification and practical application of ideas in current, diverse educational settings. Basic to the course is the notion that valuable insights into American education can be obtained through a close examination of its historical development from the colonial era to the present. Emphases on various philosophical systems in education and on the related issue of worldviews are especially helpful in illuminating ever-present tensions in American education. American education cannot be adequately understood, nor can well-informed decisions be made by administrators, instructional staff, or others responsible for education, without the benefit of both historical and philosophical perspectives.

EDUC 574, Current Issues in Education, 3 Units

Students investigate, analyze, discuss, and propose solutions for the most significant problems, concerns, and challenges in education today. They study current trends in curriculum, teaching practice, and school organization, and evaluate them in terms of the effectiveness of teaching and learning and the quality of life in the school community.

EDUC 589A, Research for Educators: Beginning Process, 2 Units

This advanced course enables teachers to become more informed users and designers of educational research. Teachers begin the process of planning and implementing their own classroom or school-based inquiry. Through activities integrated in their own research process, teachers learn more about how to locate, value, and synthesize other relevant research; select and employ appropriate types of qualitative or quantitative methods of data gathering; and analyze a variety of descriptive data. Teachers complete the process in EDUC 589B.

Prerequisite: Completion of student teaching if in Teacher Credential program

EDUC 589B, Research for Educators: Finish Reporting, 1 Unit

This course is a sequel to EDUC 589A, enabling teachers to complete their own research inquiry process and submit a final research report. Teachers work independently and conference with a faculty member and peers in order to review fully their data gathering, analyses, and results, and to revise and edit effectively their completed research reports.

Prerequisite: EDUC 589A

EDUC 599, Readings in Education, 1-4 Units

EDUC 600, Practicum Instructional Planning and Classroom Management, 3 Units

Participating teachers work closely with their university support provider to critique, analyze, and progressively improve their practices in instructional planning, classroom management, use of technology, and other areas of teaching to enhance learning. Professional development plans are developed with the assistance of the support provider to target the specific area of need. The plan is completed within the first three weeks of module two of the program so as to be effectively implemented throughout the program.

Prerequisites: Completion of a Preliminary Teacher Credentialing program and a California K-12 teaching position

EDUC 601, Practicum Assessment and Diagnostic Instruction, 3 Units

Participating teachers work closely with their university support provider to collect, review, and analyze assessment data from their preliminary credential program, their current classroom assessment activities, and assessment data from the school site with the goal of developing competency in student assessment, self-evaluation, and diagnostic instruction.

Prerequisites: Completion of a Preliminary Teacher Credentialing program and a California K-12 teaching position

EDUC 602, Practicum Teaching Special Populations, 3 Units

Participating teachers work closely with their university support provider and other university and school site support providers to enhance their skills in developing strategies for planning and teaching to meet the needs of English Language Learners, students with disabilities, gifted and talented students, and all other student populations.

Prerequisites: Completion of a Preliminary Teacher Credentialing program and a California K-12 teaching position

EDUC 603, Practicum Using Community Resources to Reduce the Achievement Gap, 3 Units

Participating teachers carry out specific projects under the supervision of their university support provider, utilizing a variety of community resources to meet specific needs in their student population with the goal of reducing the achievement gap. They become more familiar with health-related issues in the P-12 setting and the resources for meaningful intervention toward meeting individual student needs. This practicum requires participation in community-based workshops and other programs to expand the participating teacher's horizon on resources and opportunities in the community.

Prerequisites: Completion of a Preliminary Teacher Credentialing program and a California K-12 teaching position

EDUC 661, Clear Induction Orientation, 3 Units

This is the introductory course for the Clear Administrative Services Credential (CASC) Program, an advanced training program, which offers quality mentoring and coaching appropriate to the professional needs of individuals in leadership positions in public and private schools.

EDUC 662, Individualized Induction Plan Implementation and Professional Development I, 3 Units

In this course, candidates will focus on completing the goals in their Individual Induction Plan (IIP) and professional development activities correlated to the goals. The course supports the development of candidates' knowledge, skills, and dispositions through their current administrative assignment. All goals in the IIP are aligned with the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL).

Prerequisite: EDUC 661

EDUC 663, Individualized Induction Plan Implementation and Professional Development II, 3 Units

In this course, candidates will continue to focus on completing the goals in their Individual Induction Plan (IIP) and professional development activities correlated to the goals. The course supports the development of candidates' knowledge, skills, and dispositions through their current administrative assignment. All goals in the IIP are aligned with the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL).

Prerequisites: EDUC 661, EDUC 662

EDUC 664, Clear Induction Assessment, 3 Units

In this course, candidates will complete their Individual Induction Plan (IIP) goals and their year #2 required professional development activities. The course continues to support the development of candidates' knowledge, skills, and dispositions through their current administrative assignment. Summative assessment and reflection will be an integral component of this course.

Prerequisites: EDUC 661, EDUC 662 and EDUC 663

EDUC 702, Proseminar in Educational Leadership, 1 Unit

As a required course for all incoming doctoral students in the Educational Leadership program, the proseminar has three primary goals: 1) to orient students to the intellectual life of doctoral study; 2) to provide opportunities for students to become familiar with steps and procedures required for successful completion of the doctoral program, including a plan and timeline for accomplishing major academic and professional milestones; and 3) to introduce students to the technology, tools, and academic resources needed for doctoral study, including use of the Azusa Pacific University library catalog and databases. The proseminar provides an early opportunity for students to prepare for the rigors of doctoral work and to become familiar with the culture and expectations of the Educational Leadership program. All proseminar activities are designed to help students develop connections with each other and with the faculty to create a community of learners and scholars.

EDUC 710, Developing the Leader Within, 2 Units

Leadership impact and influence - positive or negative - are greatly related to the skills, values, and principles of the leader. This course will focus on the mental, ethical, psychological, spiritual, and emotional aspects of leadership, both in the context of the literature, as well as through use of various assessments. These will include guided self-reflection and a 360-degree assessment by those within the leader's span of influence. Patterns of leadership failure will also be explored.

EDUC 712, Leading Change in Education: Theory to Practice, 3 Units

This course examines leadership, organizational development, and change theories, with particular application to contemporary public K-12 environments - classroom, school, district, state, and national arenas. The emphasis is on the role of leader as change agent within systems and/or organizations but also on the impact of change on individuals and communities. Theoretical as well as practical perspectives relative to the nature of leadership will be balanced in the context of discussion of the implications for practice. Leadership in the context of organizational culture, communication, motivation, integrity, and change will be incorporated throughout the course.

Prerequisite: EDUC 710

EDUC 713, Diversity and Equity in Education, 3 Units

Students examine diversity and equity issues impacting P-12 students, schools, and communities. Relevant theoretical perspectives are explored to help students deepen their knowledge, skills, and dispositions in order to perpetuate or to change cross cultural patterns in schools. The course raises issues related to justice, excellence, and other topics that call for reflection and the student's ability to intervene as needed.

EDUC 716, Educational Policy: Analysis, Praxis, and Reform, 3 Units

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to critically analyze, formulate, and implement educational policies and practices that advance the achievement of P-12 students. Theory and praxis aligned to federal, state, local, and district policies will be examined. The impact of historical and current legislative trends, (such as school funding policies, accountability, and certification processes), will be appraised, interpreted, and critiqued. Implications for various student populations will be considered.

EDUC 718, Group Dynamics and Conflict, 2 Units

This course is focused on group dynamics and conflict that arise in all work groups. The roles of all individuals within the group, with focus on leadership styles, healthy group conflict, resolving conflict, and techniques for improving group decision making are explored, and ethical and legal issues related to group interventions are discussed.

EDUC 719, Special Topics in Educational Leadership, 3 Units

This course will serve as a "contemporary issues" course for the EdD in Educational Leadership, providing an opportunity to focus in depth on issue(s) in the ever-changing field of public K-12 education, incorporating a fieldwork component to enhance integrated learning, drawing from themes of earlier classes in the program. It will take one of two forms: 1) traditional classroom-based course, with a lead faculty and special speakers who provide "real-time" expertise to the particular specialty topic; 2) travel course to look at K-12 educational issues at a state, national, or international level.

EDUC 722, Strategic Planning for Educational Systems, 3 Units

This class focuses on the theory and practice of strategic planning in education systems. The course will introduce various approaches to designing and conducting strategic planning processes, including specific techniques for conducting environmental scans, SWOT analyses, strategic issue identification, and strategy formulation. This course includes an embedded fieldwork component.

EDUC 723, Legal Issues and Crisis Management in Schools, 3 Units

This course is designed to prepare students to function as school leaders in the areas of legal issues and crisis management. During this course, students will be introduced to a number of critical legal issues in schools, including suspension and expulsion, manifestation determination, student records, school safety, and privacy, including internet privacy. Students will also explore issues related to school crisis, including crisis planning, crisis teams, crisis response, and district-level and school-level issues. Each student will critique several districts' crisis plans, and will develop a crisis plan. This course includes an embedded fieldwork component.

EDUC 724, Ethical Leadership in Education, 3 Units

Students examine ethical dilemmas of leadership within contemporary educational institutions and the context of the communities they serve. The role and function of integrity, justice, fairness, and courage in leadership are examined within public and nonpublic school settings. Ethical dilemmas encountered by students in their leadership roles are explored using case study research methodologies, and evaluated in terms of value claims, propositions, and beliefs of contemporary philosophies and a Christian perspective of truth and life. Personal ethics are studied in terms of integrity in pursuing one's own sense of destiny and "calling" in the leadership roles assumed.

EDUC 731, Achievement Motivation, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of the topic of motivation in elementary and secondary school classrooms. It focuses on theories of achievement motivation and how the classroom environment shapes and influences students' motivation. The course examines different theories of achievement motivation, including attribution, perceived control, self-efficacy, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and goal theory, as well as how different student characteristics (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity) and classroom characteristics (e.g., teacher expectations, teacher behavior, classroom organization) may be related to students' motivation.

Prerequisite: EDUC 572 or equivalent or master's degree in education-related field

EDUC 734, Teaching Strategies for Diverse Learners, 3 Units

The focus of the course is on instructional models and strategies which have been researched and refined to produce student learning in a variety of settings, subjects, and grade levels. In addition to the families of models, the course introduces specific research-based, subject-matter strategies for teaching reading, writing, mathematics, oral communication, civics, geography, history, and science. The course identifies issues related to teaching a diverse student population by considering learning styles, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic backgrounds, immigrant and second language children, homeless children, and students with literacy difficulties.

EDUC 737, Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 3 Units

Given the ultimate purpose of higher education is student learning, this course explores the academic enterprise through an examination of the teaching-learning experience in the context of higher education. Emphasis is placed on curriculum design, identification of student learning outcomes, effective teaching methodologies, course development and delivery, and outcomes assessment.

EDUC 739, Professional Development and Adult Learning, 3 Units

This course examines theories related to the purposes, aims, and distinct characteristics of adult learning and motivation for learning. Included are Knowles's andragogy and self-directed learning, Maslow's theory of perspective transformation, McClusky's theory of margin, and Cross's characteristics of adult learners and chain-of-response models. Theories are applied to the ongoing professional development of teachers through staff development and organized learning activities. Current approaches to K-12 staff development are considered.

Prerequisite: EDUC 572 or equivalent

EDUC 746, Advanced Data Analysis, 3 Units

The student explores advanced techniques of data analysis, including application of computer software. Although emphasis is placed on multivariate quantitative techniques, strategies for analyzing qualitative data are also included. Multivariate statistical tools include factor analysis, multiple regression, path analysis, and discriminant analysis.

Prerequisites: EDUC 700, EDUC 740, and EDUC 741; EDUC 742 (recommended)

EDUC 747, Standards-based Assessment, 3 Units

This course introduces educational measurement theories, applications, and their relationships with standards-based assessment. It emphasizes the practical applications of standards-based assessment in the areas of improving instruction and evaluating programs. The course also addresses computer applications using testing research databases.

EDUC 760, The Nature of Inquiry in Education, 2 Units

The Nature of Inquiry offers students an opportunity to begin exploring key aspects of the research process - question formulation, literature search and review, research design, data collection and analysis, drawing conclusions, and identifying implications. Students will be given the opportunity to enhance their skills in locating and evaluating the literature of the field, exploring scholarly writing, and identifying possible dissertation topics.

Corequisite: EDUC 761

EDUC 761, Introduction to Educational Research, 2 Units

The course introduces quantitative and qualitative research designs. Students examine the role of theory, research, and its applications to practice in education. Statistical concepts, such as hypothesis testing, basic descriptive and inferential statistics are presented in relation to quantitative research designs. Students experience hands-on computer applications with SPSS software. Qualitative approaches to research are also explored through reading and evaluating empirical research.

Corequisite: EDUC 760

EDUC 762, Quantitative Inquiry in Education, 3 Units

This course introduces students to quantitative inquiry methods and applications of statistical procedures to practical educational research problems. Emphasis is placed on inferential and univariate statistics and various multivariate analysis techniques such as multiple regression, factorial ANOVA, multivariate ANOVA, and repeated measures. Students develop an understanding of the relationship between statistics and research design and learn to choose and apply the most appropriate statistical procedures in correlational and experimental studies.

Prerequisites: EDUC 760 and EDUC 761

EDUC 765, Ethical Dilemmas in Educational Leadership, 3 Units

Students examine ethical dilemmas of leadership within contemporary educational institutions and the context of the communities they serve. The role and function of integrity, justice, fairness, and courage in leadership are examined within public and nonpublic school settings. Ethical dilemmas encountered by students in their leadership roles are explored using case study research methodologies, and evaluated in terms of value claims, propositions, and beliefs of contemporary philosophies and a Christian perspective of truth and life. Personal ethics are studied in terms of integrity in pursuing one's own sense of destiny and "calling" in the leadership roles assumed.

EDUC 767, Qualitative Inquiry in Education, 2 Units

This course aims to introduce the perspectives, purposes, designs, analysis, interpretation and reporting of qualitative research in the field of education through reading and discussion of exemplifying articles. Ethnography, phenomenology, narrative inquiry, case study, grounded theory and qualitative evaluation studies are among the designs examined. The data collection methods of observation, interviewing, and document analysis will be studied and practiced.

Prerequisites: EDUC 760 and EDUC 761

EDUC 768, Methods of Data Collection and Analysis, 2 Units

The course addresses methods of data collection and analysis procedures for quantitative and qualitative research. Probability and non-probability samplings and purposive sampling, instrument designs will be discussed. Data analysis methods will be practiced.

Prerequisites: EDUC 762 and EDUC 767

EDUC 769, Program Evaluation in Education: Assessment for Decision Making, 3 Units

This course introduces the skills and knowledge of the field of program evaluation and their application to educational programs. In addition to understanding and identifying the issues and problems that threaten validity and reliability in program evaluations, students learn to be thoughtful consumers of evaluations as well and produce their own evaluation design. While theory guides the discussion of issues, emphasis is placed on application to good practice. Students produce a brief literature review, design and execute a program evaluation, and report the decision(s) based on the findings. This course includes an embedded fieldwork component.

Prerequisite: EDUC 768

EDUC 770, Dissertation Milestone: Writing the Introduction, 1 Unit

The purpose of the course is to assist students in identifying a research interest, narrowing and refining that interest, and identifying research questions that are directly tied to the research goals. Emphasis is placed on framing a research topic within the context of existing literature as a starting point for the dissertation, and developing a rationale for why the research is necessary and potentially valuable to the discipline. Upon successful completion of EDUC 770 students will have an initial draft of the dissertation introduction (Chapter 1) that provides an overview of the proposed dissertation inquiry.

Prerequisites: EDUC 760 and EDUC 761

EDUC 771, Dissertation Milestone: Literature Review, 2 Units

This course is designed to facilitate the writing process of the literature review for students' dissertation topics. In addition to foundational academic writing skills such as structure, style, and voice, the course addresses higher-level critical thinking skills required for educational research including analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of existing scholarly literature. Upon successful completion of EDUC 771 students will have an initial draft of the dissertation literature review (Chapter 2).

Prerequisite: EDUC 770

EDUC 772, Dissertation Milestone: Dissertation Proposal, 2 Units

This course serves as a checkpoint assessment of students' readiness to complete their dissertation. Emphasis is placed on preparing a well-designed dissertation proposal that identifies the connection between the research questions, scholarly literature, and methodology. Upon successful completion of EDUC 772 students will have a draft overview of the dissertation methodology (Chapter 3), IRB application, and dissertation proposal.

Prerequisite: EDUC 771

EDUC 773, Dissertation Milestone: Data Collection, 1 Unit

The purpose of this course is to assist students in collecting research data with tests, self-report measures, questionnaires, interviews, observations, documents, or audio-visual materials. Emphasis is placed on enhancing the quality and credibility of the qualitative data and building the validity and reliability of the quantitative data. Upon successful completion of EDUC 773 students will have collected the data that they proposed. This course can be repeated in the following semester if data collection is not completed.

Prerequisite: EDUC 772

EDUC 774, Data Collection and Analysis for Dissertation, 1 Unit

This course is designed to guide and enable students to engage in data analysis processes for their dissertation. During the course students will work with their dissertation committee and meaningfully analyze the qualitative and quantitative data collected. Upon completion of EDUC 774 students will have prepared and analyzed the data they have collected using appropriate measures and techniques.

Prerequisite: EDUC 773

EDUC 776, Dissertation Milestone: Results, Discussion, and Conclusion, 2 Units

The purpose of this course is to guide students in providing an in-depth interpretation, analysis, and synthesis of the dissertation results. During this course students will work with their committee members to explore their dissertation findings in light of the study's research questions, literature review, and conceptual framework. Emphasis will be placed on providing students an opportunity to reflect thoroughly on the study's findings and the practical and theoretical implications. Upon completion of EDUC 776 students will have developed their Findings (Chapter 4), Discussion of Findings (Chapter 5), and Conclusion (Chapter 6) toward completion of the dissertation.

Prerequisite: EDUC 774

EDUC 777, Dissertation, 2 Units

After completing all other program coursework requirements, Ed.D. students work with their dissertation committee in conducting a doctoral-level research project in educational leadership. Students enroll for two units of dissertation credit and must re-enroll each semester until the dissertation is completed and successfully defended.

Prerequisite: EDUC 774

EDUC 794, Dissertation Research, 3-6 Units

Students work with their dissertation committee in conducting a doctoral-level research project in educational leadership. Students enroll for at least three units of dissertation credit the first semester.

Prerequisite: EDUC 790

EDUC 795, Dissertation Research, 3 Units

Students work with their dissertation committee in conducting a doctoral-level research project in educational leadership. After enrolling in EDUC 794 for one semester, students enroll for at least three units of dissertation credit in this course and must re-enroll each semester from the time their proposal is approved until the dissertation is completed.

Prerequisite: EDUC 794

EDUC 799, Readings in Educational Leadership, 1-3 Units

Students enroll in this course to pursue independent study investigating subjects and interests that lie beyond regular course offerings. The student explores topics in greater depth than in other courses and/or initiates an individual project. Readings are pursued in accordance with a study plan, which is developed in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and approved by the department chair.

LIB 500, School Library Media Center Management, 3 Units

This course focuses on the administration of school library media centers in terms of planning, facilities, budgeting, marketing, legal concerns, community relations, policy development, supervision and program evaluation. It emphasizes the professional ethics and responsibilities of teacher librarians in facilitating access to information in a 21st century digital age.

LIB 505, Collection Development in School Libraries, 3 Units

This course focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of the selection, evaluation, acquisition, and management of collections in school libraries to support curriculum and encourage reading for pleasure. Students investigate criteria, tools, procedures, and policies and the impact of technology on collection development practices.

LIB 510, Learning Resources for Elementary Schools, 3 Units

This course focuses on children's literature, multiple literacies, library programming and other resources for elementary school students in a 21st century digital age. Anti-bias, analytical criteria are used to ensure inclusive books and materials of instructional merit that enrich literacy experiences in diverse, global societies and foster lifelong learning.

LIB 515, Learning Resources for Secondary Schools, 3 Units

This course focuses on young adult literature, multiple literacies, library programming and other resources for secondary school students in a 21st century digital age. Anti-bias, analytical criteria are used to ensure inclusive books and materials of instructional merit that enrich literacy experiences in diverse, global societies and foster lifelong learning.

LIB 520, Organization and Cataloging of Learning Materials/Resources, 3 Units

This course focuses on the theory and practice of bibliographic control and classification of print and nonprint information resources, including ebooks and other digital materials for the school library media center. Students apply cataloging standards, AACR2, MARC21, Dewey, LCC, and OCLC, as well as subject analysis tools, Sears, and LCSH.

LIB 525, Information Retrieval and Reference Services, 3 Units

This course focuses on the location, retrieval and evaluation of print and nonprint resources, including digital materials for the school library media center. Students model teaching information searching skills, use reference interview strategies that meet the needs of diverse learners, and utilize advanced online search techniques.

LIB 530, School Library-Classroom Partnerships, 3 Units

This course focuses on the role of teacher librarians as professional development leaders forming curricular partnerships with classroom teachers and applying instructional design models to assist in the access and development of 21st century resources for collaborative teaching and learning.

LIB 535, Library Media Technologies, 3 Units

This course focuses on information and digital literacy in multiple learning environments, transliteracy, and the cycle of information, technology resources, and tools for digital citizenship. Students apply basic principles for evaluation, selection, and application of software, hardware, and Internet/digital technologies, and demonstrate ethical, legal, and safe uses of information in media and online resources. There are opportunities for designing multimedia materials for face-to-face and online instruction.

LIB 540, Current Topics in School Media Centers, 3 Units

In this course, students discuss, investigate, analyze, evaluate and propose solutions for the most significant problems, concerns, and challenges in school library media centers in a 21st century, global, digital age. They study trends in librarianship, practices in curriculum, instruction, literacy, diversity, technology and other issues that impact the role of teacher librarians in schools and communities.

LIB 545, Information, Transliteracy and Digital Multiple Environments, 3 Units

The course is designed to meet the Special Class Authorization on information and digital literacies for California teacher librarians in addressing the technology needs of 21st Century P-12 global learners. This is an option to meet the new standards, 10 and 11, from Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) for California teacher librarians, Students must be enrolled in the Teacher Librarian Services Credential program.

LIB 550, Field Experiences for the Teacher Librarian, 3 Units

In this course, students engage in practical field experiences in diverse P-12 school library media centers, linking theory and practice from prior courses to reinforce the role of teacher librarians as ethical, professional information specialists and skilled instructional leaders in their field who facilitate access to information in a global, digital age and are strong advocates for equity, literacy and social justice in democratic societies.

Faculty

Dean

Paul Gray, Ed.D., University Libraries

Chair, Department of Library and Information Studies

Maria Pacino, Ed.D.

Professors

Paul Gray, Ed.D.

Maria Pacino, Ed.D.

David Harmeyer, Ed.D.

Associate Professor

Denise Gehring, M.S.