Department of Advanced Studies

The Department of Advanced Studies offers master’s degree programs for candidates seeking to expand their knowledge and further their education. They may pursue a Master of Arts in Educational Technology or a Master of Arts in Education with an emphasis in Learning and Technology, Special Education, or Teaching with an embedded California Preliminary Teaching Credential or Preliminary Education Specialist Credential.

The Master of Arts in Educational Technology and the emphasis coursework for the Master of Arts in Education are delivered completely online to provide flexibility and convenience to candidates within their professional practice.

Master of Arts in Education Emphases

Candidates complete foundations and specialization coursework for the M.A.Ed. in the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education or the Department of Special Education alongside emphasis coursework in the Department of Advanced Studies for one of the following areas:

Master of Arts in Education: Learning and Technology

  • The Learning and Technology emphasis focuses on foundational tools necessary to design and implement instructional experiences that integrate technology throughout the curriculum. 

Master of Arts in Education: Special Education

  • The Special Education emphasis is designed to develop the advanced knowledge needed to serve students with special needs.

Master of Arts in Education: Teaching

  • The Teaching emphasis blends advanced coursework in curriculum and instruction with graduate work in practitioner research to provide candidates’ with a depth of knowledge within the field of education.

EDTC 511, Foundations in Educational Technology, 3 Units

This course focuses on developing proficiency with the foundational skills necessary for the Online Master of Arts in Educational Technology. Working in synchronous and asynchronous environments, students utilize a variety of applications and skills necessary for competency in the program.

EDTC 515, Emerging Trends in Technology, 3 Units

This class looks at the historical development of educational technology and the social issues influencing its growth and implementation. Attention is also given to a synthesis of research related to the field, professional organizations serving the discipline and emerging innovative uses of educational technology.

EDTC 517, Digital Communications, 3 Units

This course engages students in collaborative, investigative, and reflective learning opportunities through the exploration of relevant digital communication tools. Attention is given to current modes of communication that utilize a digital platform and effective strategies for implementation within teaching/learning environments.

EDTC 518, Global Learning/Cross-cultural Classroom, 3 Units

This course focuses on the use of technology to develop global, cultural, geographical, environmental, and sociopolitical understanding. Students engage their own classrooms in global learning projects as a vehicle to promote cross-cultural literacy, a necessary skill for the global workforce and the 21st century.

EDTC 520, Managing Tech-Supported Curricular Tools, 3 Units

This course explores managing various technology-supported curricular tools applicable to leadership and instruction in the educational environment. Topics include leadership roles in technology, technology planning, computer applications, and designing a technology implementation plan.

EDTC 521, Digital Imagery for Learning Environments, 3 Units

This course covers a variety of digital imaging and audio applications and their operating tools utilized for teaching/learning environments. Students develop the skills necessary to create, design, and manipulate images along with editing video and audio for digital and/or interactive media.

EDTC 523, Educational Applications of Information Design and Hypermedia, 3 Units

The basics of information design and hypermedia are studied. Topics include the definition and application of information design and hypermedia, the development of hypermedia, the impact of information design on hypermedia, and the impact of hypermedia on society. Students incorporate principles of information design into their hypermedia/global learning projects.

EDTC 524, Instructional Design and Development, 3 Units

This course focuses on the utilization of design principles to effectively communicate instructional and professional materials prepared for the classroom, school/district, and professional development use. Implications on the educational experience of teachers, students, and administrators are also explored. Working in collaboration with other class members, students design an educational presentation/product for professional use.

EDTC 526, Practicum in Educational Applications of Technology, 3 Units

The primary focus of this practicum is a research-designed multimedia portfolio that showcases skills the student has acquired in the Online Educational Technology program. This practicum covers research, use of applied software and educational technologies, a growth assessment, comprehensive e-portfolio, and final presentation to conclude the requirements for the master's degree. This course must be taken at the end of the coursework.

Prerequisite: all coursework in educational technology completed

EDTC 527, Special Topics in Educational Technology, 3 Units

The current technologies, trends, and a variety of special topics in educational technology are explored. The course covers practical and theoretical aspects, effectiveness, and problems related to the implementation of the topic into relevant teaching/learning environments. Different topics may be taken and repeated for credit.

EDUC 504, Teaching and Cultural Diversity, 3 Units

This course focuses on a reflective examination of the interaction of several variables which affect educational success and failure for students who are linguistically and culturally different: the students' cultural background, including ethnic, racial, religious, and gender issues; the school's cultural format of an educational setting; and the social forces in the wider community. The underlying assumption of the course is that the achievement of equity and maintenance of cultural diversity in pluralistic democracies are not only desirable goals, but also necessary for political unity, social stability, and sustained economic development. The educational system plays a critical role in nurturing multiculturalism, creating instructional environments which encourage tolerance and praise for cultural diversity, and honoring cultural differences as assets rather than deficiencies. Educators have a moral and civic responsibility to ensure that multicultural attitudes and values permeate the total school curriculum and learning environment. Students study the nature of culture and learn to appreciate the strong influence that a student's culture has on learning behavior and values. They also develop ways to uncover more aspects of cultural diversity among their students and evaluate culturally appropriate responses and strategies which enhance learning opportunities.

EDUC 507, Family, Community, and School Connections, 3 Units

This course focuses on community dynamics, community building, and parent involvement as essential components in education. Students engage in utilizing asset-based community building strategies in educational practice as they map their school communities, conduct capacity inventories, and develop action plans for parent/community involvement. Students also discuss and define their role in building strong partnerships with all families, especially those in low-income communities of color. Successful school reform models of parent involvement are examined along with their connection to higher student achievement.

EDUC 508, Assessment and Evaluation in Multicultural Classrooms, 3 Units

This course reviews the uses, demands, and limitations of formal, standardized testing practices and embraces assessment of 21st Century Skills. Students explore informal observational assessment, student self-assessment, parental involvement, portfolios, criterion- and performance-based assessment, and assessing critical thinking, creativity, citizenship, collaboration, and problem-solving. The course also provides an introduction to Smarter Balanced Assessment protocols. Finally, students explore ways to assess and improve their own instructional programs and teaching.

EDUC 509, Special Topics in Education, 3 Units

Students study specific current topics, trends, technologies, or innovative programs in the field of bilingual/English language development. The course covers theoretical and practical aspects of issues related to new problems or new possibilities for improving and enhancing language, literacy, or academic learning opportunities for bilingual students.

EDUC 511, Essentials in Learning and Technology, 1 Unit

This course focuses on introducing and developing proficiency with the essential skills necessary for the Master of Arts in Education: Learning & Technology emphasis. Students utilize a variety of applications and skills necessary for competency in the program. This course must be taken in the first term of the program.

EDUC 541, Emerging Literacy, K-12, 3 Units

This course focuses on the emerging literacy needs of K-12 students who are at beginning or minimal levels of processing reading and writing effectively for meaning, including English language learners with distinct literacy development needs. Students examine sound socio-psycholinguistic insights into the nature and development of reading and writing processes and explore the critical conditions that help learners become more strategic, self-aware readers and writers. Included in the course are investigations into structuring balanced literacy experiences, guided reading and writing, literacy-enriched environments, quality reading materials, meaningful records of growth, and other practices which increase students' pleasure, value, and success in their literate lives.

EDUC 574, Current Issues in Education, 3 Units

Students investigate, analyze, discuss, and propose solutions for the most significant problems, concerns, and challenges in education today. They study current trends in curriculum, teaching practice, and school organization, and evaluate them in terms of the effectiveness of teaching and learning and the quality of life in the school community.

EDUC 589A, Research for Educators: Beginning Process, 2 Units

This advanced course enables teachers to become more informed users and designers of educational research. Teachers begin the process of planning and implementing their own classroom or school-based inquiry. Through activities integrated in their own research process, teachers learn more about how to locate, value, and synthesize other relevant research; select and employ appropriate types of qualitative or quantitative methods of data gathering; and analyze a variety of descriptive data. Teachers complete the process in EDUC 589B.

Prerequisite: Completion of student teaching if in Teacher Credential program

EDUC 589B, Research for Educators: Finish Reporting, 1 Unit

This course is a sequel to EDUC 589A, enabling teachers to complete their own research inquiry process and submit a final research report. Teachers work independently and conference with a faculty member and peers in order to review fully their data gathering, analyses, and results, and to revise and edit effectively their completed research reports.

Prerequisite: EDUC 589A

SPED 500, Special Topics, 1-3 Units

This course allows students to complete unit requirements for their credential or degree in special education.

SPED 501, Instructional Strategies for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities, 3 Units

This course examines the instructional strategies, instructional methodology, and materials for teaching individuals with moderate/severe disabilities. It focuses on research-based instructional strategies that permit access to the CORE curriculum and grade-level standards, functional academics, life skills, and adaptations and modifications to Core curriculum and California State Standards.

SPED 502, Diagnosis and Prescriptive Intervention for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities, 3 Units

This course provides candidates with the knowledge and skills about assessment procedures and remediation strategies to support students with moderate/severe disabilities. The student develops skills by gathering information from a variety of formal and informal sources. Each candidate demonstrates knowledge of principles and strategies of assessment, curriculum, and instruction, and utilizes assessment data to develop IEP goals, objectives, adaptations, and instructional plans.

SPED 503, Behavioral Support to Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities, 3 Units

This course provides the candidate with the skills and legal framework essential to the development of positive behavior supports and self-management outcomes for students with moderate/severe disabilities. Candidates examine the biological, neurological, and psychological foundations of behavior disorders, appropriate communication, and management strategies that are aligned with instructional practices. The foundations of functional analysis of behavior leading to positive behavior intervention plans are examined. Models of collaborative practices that lead to critical partnerships with students, families, educators and agencies are investigated through skill development and self-analysis.

SPED 508, Current Trends in Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities, 3 Units

This course explores transition processes for students with mild/moderate/severe disabilities across their lifespan. Additionally, this course explores and analyzes the transition processes and procedures integral to a comprehensive secondary transition education program design, including a focus on an outcomes orientation approach in working with all stakeholders in the preparation for post-secondary life in the areas of post-secondary education, employment, and life management, and evidence-based practices in instructional methods for community-based instruction (CBI), career development, work-based learning and integration of technology. The course includes a review of the use of informal and formal assessments that commonly guide the educational professional through the transition process for a student with disabilities (mild/moderate or moderate/severe). Additionally, the course examines promising practices in how to partner with all stakeholders (family, school, community and agency partners) to provide the needed supports and services as the student with disability transitions out of the post-secondary environment.

SPED 509, Technology in Special Education, 3 Units

This course introduces the use of media and technology and its impact on the delivery of services for students with disabilities. Devices (hardware and software) that may be used to adapt computers to the needs of the disabled child are considered such as audiovisual production equipment, commercial instructional materials, and augmentative communication devices, as well as other devices that may be necessary to provide an appropriate education for students with disabilities. (Level II students only)

SPED 510, Research-based Learning Theories, 3 Units

This course engages students in practitioner research to connect multi-intelligence and universal design theories into their special education practices. Students design unit plans to embed technology and differentiated instruction.

SPED 512, Autism Spectrum Disorders: From Theory to Practice, 3 Units

This course develops familiarity with a variety of topics that relate to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Issues related to diagnosis, etiologies, and characteristics of autism across the lifespan are presented. Candidates demonstrate required knowledge and skill outlined in the Standards: (S1) characteristics for students with ASD, (S2) teaching learning and behavior strategies for students with ASD, and (S3) collaborating with other service providers and Implementation for AB 2302 (Assembly Bass Bill).

SPED 513, Perscriptive Literacy and Math with Assistive Technology, 3 Units

This course addresses the theoretical and practical aspects of implementing active learning environments that exploit technologies to support and access the general education curriculum for students with disabilities in the area of literacy and math. In addition, the course addresses the Assistive Technology initiative law of Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988. The course provides participants with opportunities to use assistive technology to move their students with disabilities toward greater autonomy in and out of the classroom. The National Educational Technology Standards and Performance Indicators for All Teachers are also included.

SPED 521, Collaboration, Inclusion, Community Integration for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities, 3 Units

This course provides the candidate with a systems perspective for understanding and supporting individuals with moderate/severe disabilities and their families as they interact with schools and community agencies. The candidate begins to develop an appreciation of the family issues related to living with an individual with a moderate/severe disability. Candidates learn effective collaborative strategies to assist with team building, program development, and joint problem solving, as well as strategies to assist students with moderate/severe disabilities and their families plan for transition from school to work. This course also provides the candidate with theories regarding second-language learners, cultural diversity and social skills in terms of understanding ethnic differences and the dynamics of interacting with the student's family.

SPED 522, Collaboration and Communication Skills of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder, 3 Units

Designed to develop collaboration and consultation skills of students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Includes home-school interactions, family and community support services. Provides an overview of communication, typical and atypical language and communication development across the life span and interventions for the development of language and communication are covered.

SPED 525, Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing, 3 Units

This course prepares teacher candidates to deliver a comprehensive program of systematic instruction in reading, writing, listening, and speaking, aligned to the state-adopted English Language Arts Content Standards, the Reading/Language Arts Framework (2007), and the Common Core State Standards for English-Language Arts (2012). Through application of research-based instructional practices introduced in the course, candidates learn to address the needs of special education students and the full range of diverse learners, as referenced in the framework and the RICA Content Specifications.

SPED 526, Specialized Academic Instruction: Reading, Writing, and Math, 3 Units

This course introduces candidates to multifaceted and multitiered methodologies and strategies necessary for teaching and engaging diverse students with disabilities in mathematics and language arts. Candidates become proficient in making explicit connections between ongoing assessment, student characteristics and strengths, instruction, and curriculum. They learn to analyze data to plan effective and differentiated instruction and interventions, and also how to collaboratively design effective IEP goals while considering the role of technology in those goals.

SPED 528, Assessment and IEP Development, 3 Units

This course examines current assessment mandates for students with mild to moderate to severe disabilities. Teacher candidates study test development and learn to evaluate assessment tools based on current research-based policies and mandates. Candidates also learn to administer and interpret norm-criterion reference assessment instruments and informal surveys or assessment instruments, and come to understand the influence of cultural and linguistic factors in the development of Individual Education Program (IEP) goals and Individual Transition Plans (ITPs).

SPED 529, Positive Behavior Supports for Students with Exceptional Needs, 3 Units

This course provides teacher candidates with the skills and legal framework essential to the development of positive behavior supports and self-management outcomes for students with disabilities. Candidates examine foundations of behavior disorders, appropriate communication, and behavioral support strategies that align with best practices. The foundations of functional analysis of behavior that leads to the development of positive behavior intervention plans are examined. Models of collaborative practices that lead to positive relationships and critical partnerships with students, families, educators, and agencies are investigated through skill development and self-analysis.

SPED 530, Introduction to Individual Differences and Strengths-based Education, 3 Units

Candidates are introduced to the characteristics of individuals with exceptional needs through strengths-based philosophy and educational practices modeled in the classroom. This course will explore factors including but not limited to cultural differences, socio-economic disadvantages, and gender biases, in order to achieve awareness of students' strengths and individuality of persons with differing experiences. There is an introduction to the legal requirements of educating culturally diverse learners in the least restrictive environments. This course is approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) to meet the mainstreaming requirements for a Clear Teaching Credential for the Multiple Subject and Single Subject Preliminary Credentialed student.

SPED 532, Bilingual Special Education, 3 Units

This course examines issues related to provisions of services to culturally and linguistically diverse students. This is a requirement for intern credential students who are meeting the preservice hours requirement/enhancement program. Emphasis is on techniques and strategies to modify general and special education classrooms to accommodate second-language learners with disabilities, including curriculum development, instructional methodology, and materials for teaching second-language learners with disabilities. Culturally sensitive assessment of second-language learners with disabilities and family-focused interventions is examined.

SPED 533, Assessment and IEP Development for Students with Mild/Moderate/Severe Disabilities, 3 Units

This course examines various assessment tools and strategies that are appropriate to the diverse needs of individual students with mild/moderate/severe disabilities. Candidates learn how to assess the developmental, behavioral, social, communication, career and community life skills needs for students with mild/moderate/severe disabilities. Candidates learn to interpret assessment results to make instructional decisions and develop standards-based Individualized Education Programs.

SPED 535, Counseling, Collaboration, and Consultation, 3 Units

This course assists students in developing skills necessary for successful communication and collaboration and teamwork with administrators, teachers, paraprofessionals, and parents in providing services to individuals with exceptional needs.

SPED 536, Instructional Strategies in English Language Arts (Mild to Moderate), 3 Units

This course integrates RtI (Response to Intervention) with the area of special education as it relates to reading and written language. This course assists the teacher candidate in linking assessment data with mild to moderate disabilities including English language learners. The teacher candidate learns to develop effective IEP goals and integrate assistive technology. The course also addresses issues of classroom organization to ensure the classroom setting promotes equality for all students.

Prerequisite: Admission to special education credential program

SPED 538, Special Education Issues: Mild/Moderate Disabilities, 3 Units

This course provides original analysis of important conceptual and practical issues faced by professionals involved in educating students with mild to moderate disabilities. It addresses issues surrounding home-school-community partnerships. This course is designed to heighten concern for educational outcomes for all students, and to examine the challenges that alternative practices such as school choice, transitional services, and inclusion create for the professional and student in the field of special education. (Educational Specialist Clear Credential Candidates only)

SPED 540, Instructional Strategies in Mathematics (Mild to Moderate), 3 Units

This course integrates RtI (Response to Intervention) with the area of special education as it relates to math disorders. This course assists the teacher candidate in linking assessment data with research-based effective intervention strategies for individuals with mild/moderate disabilities including English language learners. The teacher candidate learns to develop effective IEP goals and integrate assistive technology. The course also addresses issues of classroom organization to ensure the classroom setting promotes equality for all students.

Prerequisite: Admission to special education credential program

SPED 541, Positive Behavior Supports to Students with Mild/Moderate/Severe Disabilities, 3 Units

This course examines the legal framework essential to the assessment and development of positive behavior supports and self-management outcomes for students with mild/moderate/severe disabilities. Candidates will learn the functions of behavior and design appropriate behavior support strategies based on functional behavior assessments. Models of collaborative practices that lead to critical partnerships with students, families, educators and agencies are investigated through skill development and self-analysis.

SPED 542, Meeting the Academic Needs of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder, 3 Units

This course examines methods and teaching strategies required to support students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Includes instruction on structuring the learning environment for individual success and curriculum adaptation for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The course also includes language and communication strategies appropriate for students with ASD.

SPED 546, Resource Specialist Communication Skills, 3 Units

This course provides the student with a systems perspective for understanding and supporting individuals with disabilities and their families as they interact with schools and community agencies. The student will begin to develop and appreciation of the affective family issues related to living with an individual with a disability. Students will learn effective consultative, communicative, and collaborative strategies to assist with team building, program development, and joint problem solving in school and agency settings. Skills are developed for successful communication and teamwork with administrators, teachers, paraprofessionals, and parents in the provision of services to individuals with exceptional needs.

SPED 547, Implementation of Special Education Legislation, 3 Units

An overview of special education legal mandates is provided to students as articulated in the Individuals Disabilities Educational Act (IDEA) 2004. Students also study techniques of conducting pupil identification, Individualized Education Program (IEP) meetings, coordinating individualized education programs, monitoring timelines, and observing parents' rights and due process procedures. (Education Specialist Clear Credential Candidates and Adaptive Physical Education Candidates only)

SPED 548, Staff Development and Parent Education Techniques, 3 Units

Students will learn effective consultative, communicative and collaborative strategies to assist with team building, program development and joint problem solving in school and agency settings. Techniques are discussed for planning and providing staff development and in-service education for administrators, teachers, and paraprofessionals in the implementation of special education legislation and provision of services. The course includes methods of development and implementation of parent-education workshops.

SPED 551, Clinical Practice I: Mild to Moderate Disabilities, 2 Units

Students with mild/moderate disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of specific learning disabilities, mild intellectual disabilities, autism, other health impairments, or other identified disabilities in which placement in a classroom for students with mild/moderate disabilities is deemed appropriate. During their clinical practice experience, teacher candidates are provided with on-site experiences that provide the support described in the students' Individual Educational Programs (IEPs). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with mild/moderate disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine students' current levels of performance, planning for their grade and instructional level, and capturing data to support progress on annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with California Content Standards. Candidates also monitor students' progress toward instructional goals and state-adopted standards, and, if necessary, identify behaviors impeding learning, and remediate by implementing positive behavior supports. Candidates complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school classrooms, with assignments in classroom grade levels K-12. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students.

SPED 552, Clinical Practice II: Mild to Moderate Disabilities, 2 Units

Students with mild/moderate disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of specific learning disabilities, mild intellectual disabilities, autism, other health impairments, or other identified disabilities in which placement in a classroom for students with mild/moderate disabilities is deemed appropriate. During their clinical practice experience, teacher candidates are provided with on-site experiences that provide the support described in the students' Individual Educational Programs (IEPs). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with mild/moderate disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine students' current levels of performance, planning for their grade and instructional level, and capturing data to support progress on annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with California Content Standards. Candidates also monitor students' progress toward instructional goals and state-adopted standards, and, if necessary, identify behaviors impeding learning, and remediate by implementing positive behavior supports. Candidates complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school classrooms, with assignments in classroom grade levels K-12. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students.

Prerequisite: SPED 551

SPED 554, Advanced Study: Teaching Special Populations, 3 Units

This course builds on the knowledge, skills, and strategies candidates acquire during coursework for a preliminary teaching credential. Each candidate: (a) becomes familiar with statutory provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), subsequent changes in the act, and any new, relevant statutory requirements; (b) discusses the statutory and/or local provisions relating to the education of students who are gifted and talented; (c) demonstrates the ability to create a positive, inclusive climate for individualized, specialized instruction and the assessment of students with special needs and/or abilities; and (d) demonstrates the use of instructional strategies to provide students with disabilities appropriate learning opportunities to master grade-level, state-adopted academic content standards for students at high performance levels. Finally, each candidate demonstrates the ability to establish cooperative and collaborative relationships with community and school professionals significant to the education of students with disabilities and with students' care givers, as well as with community and school professionals significant to the education of students who are gifted and talented. This course fulfills the CTC Standard for Exceptional Learner coursework required for 2042 Clear Credential. It requires permission of the program director and may not be taken prior to being recommended for the 2042 Preliminary Teaching Credential.

SPED 555A, Field Experience and Seminar (Intern), 1 Unit

This course offers the intern teacher candidate planned observational experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system, the providers of such services, and parent and families, including in general education. Candidates conduct observations in a variety of K-12 settings. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services outlined in the specific credential authorization. Candidates complete two consecutive nine-week sessions of 60 hours of field experience (30 hours each session). The distribution of observation must take place at WASC-approved school site(s). Intern Teacher candidates will be assigned a University Mentor that will provide supervision during Field Experience. The primary task of the University Mentor is to assist the teacher candidate in understanding and assuming the role of the classroom teacher. Candidates also attend two seminars during each nine-week session. The seminar explores pedagogical, legal, and professional topics that are important for special education teacher candidates.

Prerequisite: Admission to special education moderate to severe preliminary credential program.

SPED 555B, Field Experience and Seminar (Intern), 1 Unit

This course offers the intern teacher candidate planned observational experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system, the providers of such services, and parent and families, including in general education. Candidates conduct observations in a variety of K-12 settings. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services outlined in the specific credential authorization. Candidates complete two consecutive nine-week sessions of 60 hours of field experience (30 hours each session). The distribution of observation must take place at WASC-approved school site(s). Intern Teacher candidates will be assigned a University Mentor that will provide supervision during Field Experience. The primary task of the University Mentor is to assist the teacher candidate in understanding and assuming the role of the classroom teacher. Candidates also attend two seminars during each nine-week session. The seminar explores pedagogical, legal, and professional topics that are important for special education teacher candidates.

Prerequisite: Admission to special education moderate to severe preliminary credential program.

SPED 556A, Field Experience and Seminar (Non-Intern), 1 Unit

This course offers the teacher candidate planned observational experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system, the providers of such services, and parent and families, including in general education. Candidates conduct observations in a variety of K-12 settings. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services outlined in the specific credential authorization. Candidates complete two consecutive nine-week sessions of 60 hours of field experience (30 hours each session). The distribution of observation must take place at WASC-approved school site(s). Candidates also attend two seminars during each nine-week session. The seminar explores pedagogical, legal, and professional topics that are important for special education teacher candidates.

Prerequisite: Admission to special education moderate to severe preliminary credential program.

SPED 556B, Field Experience and Seminar (Non-Intern), 1 Unit

This course offers the teacher candidate planned observational experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system, the providers of such services, and parent and families, including in general education. Candidates conduct observations in a variety of K-12 settings. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services outlined in the specific credential authorization. Candidates complete two consecutive nine-week sessions of 60 hours of field experience (30 hours each session). The distribution of observation must take place at WASC-approved school site(s). Candidates also attend two seminars during each nine-week session. The seminar explores pedagogical, legal, and professional topics that are important for special education teacher candidates.

Prerequisite: Admission to special education moderate to severe preliminary credential program.

SPED 558, Advanced Theory and Research-based Practices for Supporting Students with Disabilities, 3 Units

This course builds on the knowledge, skills, and strategies candidates acquired during coursework for a preliminary teaching credential (mild/moderate or moderate/severe). Each candidate becomes familiar with the current theoretical models for serving students with disabilities in different settings. The course examines evidence-based instructional and behavioral practices for supporting students with disabilities in the classroom. Candidates demonstrate the ability to create a socially positive, instructionally rich, and behaviorally supportive environment for students with disabilities in a general education setting. Each candidate demonstrates the ability to establish cooperative and collaborative relationships with the families and community/school professionals significant to the education of students with disabilities.

Prerequisite: Admission to special education credential program

SPED 565A, Field Experience and Seminar (Intern), 1 Unit

This course offers the intern teacher candidate planned observational experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system, the providers of such services, and parent and families, including in general education. Candidates conduct observations in a variety of K-12 settings. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services outlined in the specific credential authorization. Candidates complete two consecutive nine-week sessions of 60 hours of field experience (30 hours each session). The distribution of observation must take place at WASC-approved school site(s). Intern Teacher candidates will be assigned a University Mentor that will provide supervision during Field Experience. The primary task of the University Mentor is to assist the teacher candidate in understanding and assuming the role of the classroom teacher. Candidates also attend two seminars during each nine-week session. The seminar explores pedagogical, legal, and professional topics that are important for special education teacher candidates.

SPED 565B, Field Experience and Seminar (Intern), 1 Unit

This course offers the intern teacher candidate planned observational experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system, the providers of such services, and parent and families, including in general education. Candidates conduct observations in a variety of K-12 settings. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services outlined in the specific credential authorization. Candidates complete two consecutive nine-week sessions of 60 hours of field experience (30 hours each session). The distribution of observation must take place at WASC-approved school site(s). Intern Teacher candidates will be assigned a University Mentor that will provide supervision during Field Experience. The primary task of the University Mentor is to assist the teacher candidate in understanding and assuming the role of the classroom teacher. Candidates also attend two seminars during each nine-week session. The seminar explores pedagogical, legal, and professional topics that are important for special education teacher candidates.

SPED 566A, Field Experience and Seminar (Non-Intern), 1 Unit

This course offers the teacher candidate planned observational experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system, the providers of such services, and parent and families, including in general education. Candidates conduct observations in a variety of K-12 settings. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services outlined in the specific credential authorization. Candidates complete two consecutive nine-week sessions of 60 hours of field experience (30 hours each session). The distribution of observation must take place at WASC-approved school site(s).

SPED 566B, Field Experience and Seminar (Non-Intern), 1 Unit

This course offers the teacher candidate planned observational experiences and/or interactions with the full range of the service delivery system, the providers of such services, and parent and families, including in general education. Candidates conduct observations in a variety of K-12 settings. These experiences reflect the full diversity of grades/ages, federal disability categories and the continuum of special education services outlined in the specific credential authorization. Candidates complete two consecutive nine-week sessions of 60 hours of field experience (30 hours each session). The distribution of observation must take place at WASC-approved school site(s).

SPED 571, Clinical Practice I: Moderate to Severe Disabilities, 2 Units

Students with moderate/severe disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of intellectual, behavioral, emotional, communication, sensory, autism spectrum disorder, and/or motor impairments. During clinical practice, teacher candidates are provided with on-site experiences that provide the support described in the students' Individual Educational Programs (IEPs). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with moderate/severe disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine the students' current levels of performance, planning instructional-level annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with California Content Standards, monitoring students' progress toward instructional goals and short-term objectives, and identifying behaviors impeding learning and remediating by implementing positive behavior supports. Candidates complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school classrooms, with assignments in classroom grade levels K-12. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students.

SPED 572, Clinical Practice II: Moderate to Severe Disabilities, 2 Units

Students with moderate/severe disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of intellectual, behavioral, emotional, communication, sensory, autism spectrum disorder, and/or motor impairments. During clinical practice, teacher candidates are provided with on-site experiences that provide the support described in the students' Individual Educational Programs (IEPs). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with moderate/severe disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine the students' current levels of performance, planning instructional-level annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with California Content Standards, monitoring students' progress toward instructional goals and short-term objectives, and identifying behaviors impeding learning and remediating by implementing positive behavior supports. Candidates complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school classrooms, with assignments in classroom grade levels K-12. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students.

Prerequisite: SPED 571

SPED 575A, Clinical Practice I (Contract Teaching, K-12), 1 Unit

Credit is given for a nine-week term in Fall I or Spring I (SPED 575A) or Fall II or Spring II (SPED 575B) of full-time supervised teaching in public schools as an intern teacher under contract. The intern teacher fulfills all responsibilities for which a beginning teacher is accountable with dual mentorship provided by both the university and school site.

SPED 575B, Clinical Practice II (Contract Teaching, K-12), 1 Unit

Credit is given for a nine-week term in Fall I or Spring I (SPED 575A) or Fall II or Spring II (SPED 575B) of full-time supervised teaching in public schools as an intern teacher under contract. The intern teacher fulfills all responsibilities for which a beginning teacher is accountable with dual mentorship provided by both the university and school site.

Corequisite: SPED 575A

SPED 576A, Clinical Practice I (Student Teaching, K-12), 1 Unit

Students complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school classrooms, with assignments in classroom grade levels K-12. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Students who successfully complete student teaching and meet all CTC requirements and other applicable state requirements are recommended for Preliminary Mild/Moderate Disabilities Specialist Credential. Applications for enrollment in Clinical Practice must be made by April 1 for the fall semester, or by October 1 for the spring semester.

Prerequisites: Admission to Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential program; student must submit application and be cleared prior to student teaching.

SPED 576B, Clinical Practice II (Student Teaching, K-12), 1 Unit

Students complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school classrooms, with assignments in classroom grade levels K-12. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Students who successfully complete student teaching and meet all CTC requirements and other applicable state requirements are recommended for Preliminary Mild/Moderate Disabilities Specialist Credential. Applications for enrollment in Clinical Practice must be made by April 1 for the fall semester, or by October 1 for the spring semester.

Prerequisites: Admission to Mild/Moderate Disabilities Credential program; student must submit application and be cleared prior to student teaching.

SPED 581, Historical and Philosophical Perspectives of Disability Studies, 3 Units

This course explores and analyzes the key definition of disability in light of the major theories, methodological approaches, and proposed public policy uses that shape them. Emphasis is given to the formulation of important research questions and the development of testable hypotheses based on previous theory, literature, and experience. A diverse set of current research articles on disability studies is analyzed to serve as examples and raise questions about how different research topics have been addressed and might be used to stimulate future studies. The course considers how civil rights, human rights, self-determination, social policy, and participative action research influence disability studies.

Prerequisite: SPED 582

SPED 582, Theories of Learning and Research in Disabilities Studies, 3 Units

This advanced course enables candidates to become more informed consumers and designers of empirical research. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to designing and collecting data are examined within the context of the special education discipline. This course is the second of four core course requirements for the master's degree program in special education. This course develops knowledge and skills in educational research and inquiry. The candidate chooses a research method and begin to frame the research in order to continue with the research process for the next core requirement.

SPED 583, Current Trends in Curriculum and Disabilities Studies, 3 Units

This course explores and analyzes the key definition of disability in light of the major theories, methodological approaches, and proposed public policy uses that shape them. Emphasis is given to the formulation of important research questions and the development of testable hypotheses based on previous theory, literature, and experience. A diverse set of current research articles in disability studies is analyzed to serve as examples and raise questions about how different research topics have been addressed and might be used to stimulate future studies. The course considers how civil rights, human rights, self-determination, social policy, and participative action research influence disability studies.

SPED 584A, Guided Research Project: Procedures, 3 Units

Candidates continue to examine educational research within the special education framework. Through quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods, candidates incorporate all of the pieces developed in the previous research core courses and develop a research plan, making data-driven decisions for the development and implementation of the research plan. The research process is reviewed with the emphasis on design, application, and consumption, as well as standards for writing research papers.

Prerequisite: Admission to SPED Credential program

SPED 584B, Guided Research Project: Findings, 3 Units

Candidates continue to examine educational research within the special education framework. Through quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods, candidates incorporate all of the pieces developed in the previous research core courses and develop a research plan, making data-driven decisions for the development and implementation of the research plan. The research process is reviewed with the emphasis on design, application, and consumption, as well as standards for writing research papers.

SPED 585A, Clinical Practice/Seminar for Moderate/Severe Disabilities I (Contract Teaching), 2 Units

Students with moderate/severe disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of intellectual, behavioral, emotional, communication, sensory, and/or motor impairments. During clinical practice, teacher candidates are provided with on-site experiences that provide the support described in the students' Individual Educational Programs (IEP). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with moderate/severe disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine the students' current levels of performance, planning instructional level annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with the California Content Standards, monitoring students' progress toward instructional goals and short-term objectives, identifying behaviors impeding learning, and remediate by implementing positive behavior supports.

SPED 585B, Clinical Practice/Seminar for Moderate/Severe Disabilities II (Contract Teaching), 1 Unit

Students with moderate/severe disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of intellectual, behavioral, emotional, communication, sensory, and/or motor impairments. During clinical practice, teacher candidates are provided with on-site experiences that provide the support described in the students' Individual Educational Programs (IEP). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with moderate/severe disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine the students' current levels of performance, planning instructional level annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with the California Content Standards, monitoring students' progress toward instructional goals and short-term objectives, identifying behaviors impeding learning, and remediate by implementing positive behavior supports.

SPED 586A, Clinical Practice/Seminar for Moderate/Severe Disabilities I (Student Teaching), 2 Units

Students with moderate/severe disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of intellectual, behavioral, emotional, communication, sensory, and/or motor impairments. During clinical practice, teacher candidates are provided with on-site experiences that provide the support described in the students' Individual Educational Programs (IEP). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with moderate/severe disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine the students' current levels of performance, planning instructional level annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with the California Content Standards, monitoring students' progress toward instructional goals and short-term objectives, identifying behaviors impeding learning, and remediate by implementing positive behavior supports.

SPED 586B, Clinical Practice/Seminar for Moderate/Severe Disabilities II (Student Teaching), 1 Unit

Students with moderate/severe disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of intellectual, behavioral, emotional, communication, sensory, and/or motor impairments. During clinical practice, teacher candidates are provided with on-site experiences that provide the support described in the students' Individual Educational Programs (IEP). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with moderate/severe disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine the students' current levels of performance, planning instructional level annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with the California Content Standards, monitoring students' progress toward instructional goals and short-term objectives, identifying behaviors impeding learning, and remediate by implementing positive behavior supports.

TEP 500, Special Topics in Education, 1-3 Units

Note: Please consult teacher education faculty for a list of courses required for the Intern Credential Program.

TEP 517, Clinical Experiences in Teaching Reading and Writing (7-12), 3 Units

This course includes intensive instruction in reading and language arts methods grounded in methodically sound research. The student of secondary reading and language arts methods includes effective strategies and methods for guiding and developing the content-based reading and writing abilities of all students, including students with varied reading levels and language backgrounds, examines well-designed systematic instruction programs, and the implementation of California Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Prerequisites: Admission to Single Subject Credential program;

corequisites: TESP 505 and TEP 567A

TEP 518, Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (7-12), 3 Units

This course includes intensive instruction in reading and language arts methods grounded in methodically sound research. The study of secondary reading and language arts methods includes effective strategies and methods for guiding and developing the content-based reading and wring abilities of all students, including students with varied reading levels and language backgrounds, examines well-designed systematic instructional programs, and the implementation of California Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Prerequisite: Admission to Single Subject Credential program;

corequisites: TESP 506 and TEP 568A

TEP 521, Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (K-8), 3 Units

This course prepares teacher candidates to deliver a comprehensive program of systematic instruction in reading, writing, listening, and speaking, aligned to the state-adopted English Language Arts Content Standards, the Reading/Language Arts Framework (2007), and the Common Core State Standards for English-Language Arts (2012). Through application of research-based instructional practices introduced in the course, candidates learn to address the needs of special education students and the full range of diverse learners, as referenced in the framework and the RICA Content Specifications.

TEP 522, Methods of Teaching Mathematics (K-8), 3 Units

This course engages candidates who are in clinical practice (student teaching or intern placements) in discussion of common challenges faced by teacher candidates in secondary classrooms, and also focuses on content-specific pedagogical strategies by subject matter. Issues addressed include, but are not limited to, teacher beliefs and their effect on student performance; classroom management; effective curriculum and lesson development; culturally appropriate pedagogical practices; the "plan, teach, assess, reflect, and apply" cycle; content-specific strategies for teaching and assessing; and preparation for the workforce. Individual concerns and issues raised during student teaching or during the internship are also addressed.

TEP 523, Methods of Teaching Science (K-8), 2 Units

This course introduces credential candidates to K-8 state-adopted Next Generation Science Standards and the 2015-16 Draft Science Framework, as well as science concepts and principles, scientific investigation, experimentation, and student assessment. Emphasis is placed on balanced instruction between disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and scientific and engineering practices as described in the Next Generation Science Standards. This course also focuses on facilitating K-8 students' ability to independently read and comprehend instructional materials and graphic/media representations, integrate mathematical concepts and practices in scientific investigations, development of academic language, engagement in disciplinary discourse practices, and understanding the connections between science, society, technology, and the environment. In addition, this course covers the teaching of physical education and health education in grades K-8.

Corequisite: Clinical Practice

TEP 524, Clinical Experiences with Integrating the Humanities/Methods of Integrating the Humanities, 2 Units

This course, intended for students in clinical practice (student teaching or intern placements), introduces ways to connect moral and civic education with the social sciences and the arts through thematic teaching, in ways that comply with state frameworks and academic content standards, specifically focusing on the California Common Core State Standards. Methods discussed utilize a wide range of quality children's literature and performing and visual arts strategies. Emphasis is on a meaning-centered, diverse humanities curriculum designed to promote critical thinking skills and meet the needs of all students, including those with special needs and those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. This course is designed for direct application of practice.

Corequisite: Clinical Practice

TEP 525, Clinical Experiences in Teaching Mathematics (K-8), 3 Units

This course focuses on the teaching of mathematics in the K-8 classroom, including mathematical content, instructional design, evidence-based research, and best practices in instruction. This course also emphasizes effective teaching through problem solving, communication, collaboration, creativity, and critical thinking. There is a focus on teaching diverse learners using differentiated instructional strategies and the implementation of the California Common Core State Standards (CCSS). This course is specifically designed for direct application of practice by intern teachers.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program;

corequisites: TESP 555 and TEP 565B

TEP 526, Methods of Teaching Mathematics (K-8), 3 Units

This course focuses on the teaching of mathematics in the K-8 classroom, including mathematical content, instructional design, evidence-based research, and best practices in instruction. This course also emphasizes effective teaching through problem solving, communication, collaboration, creativity, and critical thinking. There is a focus on teaching diverse learners using differentiated instructional strategies and the implementation of the California Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program;

corequisites: TESP 556 and TEP 566B

TEP 527, Clinical Experiences in Teaching Strategies (7-12), 3 Units

Designed for individuals planning to teach middle or high school, this course explores both the teacher's and the students' role in middle/secondary classrooms. This course focuses on the role of the teacher to create positive environments that foster inquiry and promote meaningful learning. Numerous aspects of middle and high school teaching and learning include: assessing students' knowledge before instruction, designing curriculum, planning lessons, determining and adapting appropriate teaching methods with special attentions given to using differentiated instruction to meet the learning needs of diverse learners, promoting inquiry, fostering dialogue, meeting district and national standards, using technology to promote learning, and assessing students' learning, and the implementation of the California Common Core State Standards (CCSS). All assignments will be completed in the specific subject area for which the individual is seeking the Single Subject Credential. This course is specifically designed for direct application of practice by intern teachers.

Prerequisite: Admission to Single Subject Credential program;

corequisites: TESP 555 and TEP 567B

TEP 528, Teaching Strategies (7-12), 3 Units

Designed for individuals planning to teach middle or high school, this course explores both the teacher's and the students' role in middle/secondary classrooms. This course focuses on the role of the teacher to create positive environments that foster inquiry and promote meaningful learning. Numerous aspects of middle and high school teaching and learning include: assessing students' knowledge before instruction, designing curriculum, planning lessons, determining and adapting appropriate teaching methods with special attention given to using differentiated instruction to meet the learning needs of diverse learners, promote learning, and assessing students' learning, and assessing students' learning, and the implementation of the California Common Core State Standards (CCSS). All assignments will be completed in the specific subject area for which the individual is seeking the Single Subject Credential.

Prerequisite: Admission to Single Subject Credential program;

corequisites: TESP 556 and TEP 568B

TEP 531, Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (7-12), 3 Units

This course includes intensive instruction in reading and language arts methods grounded in methodically sound research, to be incorporated in all subject areas. The study of secondary reading and language arts methods includes effective strategies and methods for guiding and developing the content-based reading and writing abilities of all students, including students with varied reading levels and language backgrounds. Teacher candidates examine well-designed systematic instructional programs, and the implementation of California Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for reading and writing in an integrated fashion with the standards for their subject area.

TEP 532, Secondary Pedagogy I: Teaching in Secondary Schools, 2 Units

This course is designed for individuals who are teaching in middle or high school subject areas, such as math, ELA, social studies, science, art, physical education, music, etc. Teacher candidates in this course explore the teacher's and the students' role in middle and high school classrooms. This course focuses on the history, development, and reform measures of middle and high schools to create positive environments that foster inquiry and promote a meaningful learning setting, including trends addressing cultural diversity. Aspects of middle and high school covered in this course include student-centered learning; critical teaching skills for making lessons relevant to students (including culturally relevant practices); cognitive and behavioral development as it affects curriculum design; lesson planning; differentiated instruction; use of technology; assessment; and intentional, reflective teaching practices. All assignments are completed in the subject area for which the individual is seeking the Single Subject Teaching Credential.

TEP 533, The Differentiated Classroom: Maximizing Capacity of Each Learner, Grades 7-12, 3 Units

This course explores the philosophical and practical aspects of differentiation in classroom practice as characterized by the interdependence of the key aspects of curriculum, instruction, assessment, the learner, and the learning environment. Teacher candidates engage in activities in the clinical practice/intern setting to support the development of a teaching philosophy and practice that cultivates the K-12 learner as an active participant with a shared understanding of an investment in a differentiated classroom. Teacher candidates develop competence in gathering and applying knowledge of K-12 students' achievement, instructional needs, social-emotional needs, cultural and language factors, and other relevant data necessary to improve teaching and learning for all students. Candidates also complete an Individualized Learning Plan to gain competence as a reflective practitioner and further develop the professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to meet the expectations for beginning teachers as outlined in the California Teaching Performance Expectations.

Corequisite: Clinical Practice

TEP 535, Clinical Experiences in Teaching Science (K-8), 3 Units

This course covers the principles and methodology of teaching science in the elementary school involving institutional design, material selection for hands-on experimentation, and student assessment. Health education and physical education are woven into the course to education candidates on laws pertaining to health, safety, protection, access and educational equity for all students. Emphasis is on effective teaching that utilizes a variety of resources, strategies, reading and writing connections, problem solving, and science and health applications. This course focuses on implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the California Common Core State Standards (CCSS). This course is specifically designed for direct application of practice by intern teachers.

Prerequisites: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program, submission of the Clinical Practice application by the deadline and clearance by the department;

Corequisites: TEP 585 and TEP 575A

TEP 536, Methods of Teaching Science (K-8), 3 Units

This course covers the principles and methodology of teaching science in the elementary school involving instructional design, material selection for hands-on experimentation, and student assessment. Health education and physical education are woven into the course to education candidates on laws pertaining to health, safety, protection, access, and educational equity for all students. Emphasis is on effective teaching that utilizes a variety of resources, strategies, reading and writing connections, problem solving, and solving, and science and health applications. This course focuses on implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the California Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Prerequisites: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program, submission of the Clinical Practice application by the deadline and clearance by the department;

Corequisites: TEP 586 and TEP 576A

TEP 545, Clinical Experiences with Integrating the Humanities (K-8), 3 Units

This course introduces ways to connect moral and civic education with the social sciences and the arts through thematic teaching and a wide use of quality children's literature and preforming and visual arts which are in compliance with state frameworks and academic content standards with a specific focus on the implementation of California Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Emphasis is on a meaning-centered, thinking, diverse humanities curriculum designed to meet the needs of all students including those with special needs and culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. This course is specifically deigned for direct application of practice by intern teachers.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program, submission of the Clinical Practice application by the deadline and clearance by the department;

corequisite: TEP 575B

TEP 546, Methods of Integrating the Humanities (K-8), 3 Units

This course introduces ways to connect moral and civic education with the social sciences and the arts through thematic teaching and a wide use of quality children's literature and performing and visual arts which are in compliance with state framework and academic content standards with a specific focus on the implementation of California Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Emphasis is on meaning-centered, thinking, diverse humanities curriculum designed to meet the needs of all students including those with special needs and culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program, submission of the Clinical Practice application by the deadline and clearance by the department;

corequisite: TEP 576B

TEP 547, Clinical Experiences in Curriculum Planning and Assessment (7-12), 3 Units

This course emphasizes the use of multiple methods to assess student learning in K-12 classrooms, development and assessment of performance-based tasks, and objective and standardized tests. Participants will understand not only the basics of assessment techniques, but will also learn to think critically, analyze, and make inferences to improve students' learning. Participants will develop a thematic 5-lesson unit integrating three different content areas along with the assessment plan in order to meet the unit/lessons' Common Core, academic content standards, and lesson objectives. This course assists students to prepare for the California Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) Assessing Learning. This is not a TPA preparatory class, but materials and insights from this course assist students to engage the task. Grades from this class do not translate to grades for the TPA. They are two independent entities.

Prerequisite: Admission to Single Subject Credential program, submission of the Clinical Practice application by the deadline and clearance by the department;

corequisite: TEP 577A

TEP 548, Curriculum Planning and Assessment (7-12), 3 Units

This course emphasizes the use of multiple methods to assess student learning in K-12 classrooms, development and assessment of performance-based tasks, and objective and standardized tests. Participants will understand not only the basics of assessment techniques, but will also learn to think critically, analyze, and make inferences to improve students' learning. Participants will develop a thematic 5-lesson unit integrating three different content areas along with the assessment plan in order to meet the unit/lessons' Common Core, academic content standards, and lesson objectives. This course assists students to prepare for the California Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) Assessing Learning. This is not a TPA preparatory class, but materials and insights from this course assist students to engage the task. Grades from this class do not translate to grades for the TPA. They are two independent entities.

Prerequisite: Admission to Single Subject Credential program, submission of the Clinical Practice application by the deadline and clearance by the department prior to registering for the course;

corequisite: TEP 578A

TEP 551, Clinical Practice I: Multiple Subject Credential, 2 Units

Clinical practice provides teacher candidates with a final preparatory experience toward which the teacher candidate's entire teacher education program has been planned. The purpose is to develop and verify beginning-level teaching competency in candidates by the end of the supervised semester, according to standards set by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Clinical practice provides an experience-based program in which teacher candidates and contracted credentialed candidates have opportunities to participate as classroom teachers in schools while supervised by a university mentor. Focus is given to many areas of background learning and coordinates those areas into a meaningful set of experiences.

TEP 552, Clinical Practice II: Multiple Subject Credential, 2 Units

Clinical practice provides teacher candidates with a final preparatory experience toward which the teacher candidate's entire teacher education program has been planned. The purpose is to develop and verify beginning-level teaching competency in candidates by the end of the supervised semester, according to standards set by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Clinical practice provides an experience-based program in which teacher candidates and contracted credentialed candidates have opportunities to participate as classroom teachers in schools while supervised by a university mentor. Focus is given to many areas of background learning and coordinates those areas into a meaningful set of experiences.

Prerequisite: TEP 551

TEP 561, Clinical Practice I: Single Subject Credential, 2 Units

Clinical practice provides teacher candidates with a final preparatory experience toward which the teacher candidate's entire teacher education program has been planned. The purpose is to develop and verify beginning-level teaching competency in candidates by the end of the supervised semester, according to standards set by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Clinical practice provides an experience-based program in which teacher candidates and contracted credentialed candidates have opportunities to participate as classroom teachers in schools while supervised by a university mentor. Focus is given to many areas of background learning and coordinates those areas into a meaningful set of experiences.

TEP 562, Clinical Practice II: Single Subject Credential, 2 Units

Clinical practice provides teacher candidates with a final preparatory experience toward which the teacher candidate's entire teacher education program has been planned. The purpose is to develop and verify beginning-level teaching competency in candidates by the end of the supervised semester, according to standards set by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Clinical practice provides an experience-based program in which teacher candidates and contracted credentialed candidates have opportunities to participate as classroom teachers in schools while supervised by a university mentor. Focus is given to many areas of background learning and coordinates those areas into a meaningful set of experiences.

Prerequisite: TEP 561

TEP 565A, Field Experience I (K-8), 1 Unit

Credit is given for a nine-week term in Fall I or Spring I of full-time supervised teaching in public schools as an intern teacher under contract. The intern teacher fulfills all responsibilities for which a beginning teacher is accountable with dual mentorship provided by both the university and school site.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program;

corequisites: Multiple Subject students TESP 505 and TESP 515

TEP 565B, Field Experience II (K-8), 1 Unit

Credit is given for a nine-week term in Fall I or Spring I of full-time supervised teaching in public schools as an intern teacher under contract. The intern teacher fulfills all responsibilities for which a beginning teacher is accountable with dual mentorship provided by both the university and school site.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program and TEP 565A;

corequisite: Multiple Subject students TEP 525 and TESP 555

TEP 566A, Field Experience I (K-8), 1 Unit

This course offers an introductory exploration of public schools integrating field experience in the classroom with concurrent credential methods coursework. Students complete two consecutive terms, earning one unit of credit for a minimum of 30 hours of field experience completed during each term. This course enables the institution to determine when candidates are ready to begin daily, supervised teaching.

Prerequisites: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program, TESP 506, and TESP 516

TEP 566B, Field Experience II (K-8), 1 Unit

This course offers an introductory exploration of public schools integrating field experience in the classroom with concurrent credential methods coursework. Students complete two consecutive terms, earning one unit of credit for a minimum of 30 hours of field experience completed during each term. This course enables the institution to determine when candidates are ready to begin daily, supervised teaching.

Prerequisites: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program and TEP 566A;

corequisites: Multiple Subject TEP 526 and TESP 556; special education students, please see advisor for corequisites

TEP 567A, Field Experience I (7-12), 1 Unit

Credit is given for a nine-week term in Fall I or Spring I of full-time supervised teaching in a public school. Full-time public school teachers fulfill all responsibilities for which a beginning teacher is accountable with mentorship provided by both the university and the school site.

Prerequisite: Admission to Single Subject Credential program;

corequisites: TESP 505 and TEP 517

TEP 567B, Field Experience II (7-12), 1 Unit

Credit is given for a nine-week term in Fall I or Spring I of full-time supervised teaching in a public school. Full-time public school teachers fulfill all responsibilities for which a beginning teacher is accountable with mentorship provided by both the university and the school site.

Prerequisite: Admission to Single Subject Credential program and TEP 567A;

corequisites: TEP 527 and TESP 555

TEP 568A, Field Experience I (7-12), 1 Unit

This course offers an introductory exploration of public schools integrating field experience in the classroom with concurrent credential methods coursework. Students complete two consecutive terms, earning 1 unit of credit for a minimum of 30 hours of field experience completed during each term. This course enables the institution to determine when candidates are ready to begin daily, supervised teaching.

Prerequisite: Admission to Single Subject Credential program;

corequisites: TESP 506 and TEP 518

TEP 568B, Field Experience II (7-12), 1 Unit

This course offers an introductory exploration of public schools integrating field experience in the classroom with concurrent credential methods coursework. Students complete two consecutive terms, earning 1 unit of credit for a minimum of 30 hours of field experience completed during each term. This course enables the institution to determine when candidates are ready to begin daily, supervised teaching.

Prerequisite: Admission to Single Subject Credential program and TEP 568A;

corequisites: TEP 528 and TESP 556

TEP 575A, Clinical Practice I (Contract Teaching, K-8), 2 Units

Credit is given for a nine-week term in Fall I or Spring I of full-time supervised teaching in public schools as an intern teacher under contract. With permission granted by the multiple subject program director, a teaching contract in a WASC-approved private school may be used for this requirement. The contracted teacher fulfills all responsibilities for which a beginning teacher is accountable with dual mentorship provided by both the university and school site.

Prerequisites: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program, and student must turn in a Clinical Practice application and be cleared by the department prior to registering for this course.

Corequisites: TEP 535 and TEP 585

TEP 575B, Clinical Practice II (Contract Teaching, K-8), 2 Units

Credit is given for a nine-week term in Fall II or Spring II of full-time supervised teaching in public schools as an intern teacher under contract. With permission granted by the multiple subject program director, a teaching contract in a WASC-approved private school may be used for this requirement. The contracted teacher fulfills all responsibilities for which a beginning teacher is accountable with dual mentorship provided by both the university and school site.

Prerequisites: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program and TEP 575A;

corequisite: TEP 545

TEP 576A, Clinical Practice I (Student Teaching, K-8), 2 Units

Students complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school K-8 classrooms, with assignments at the primary and intermediate level. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Students who successfully complete student teaching and meet all CTC requirements and other applicable state requirements are recommended for SB 2042 Preliminary Multiple Subject Credential. Applications for enrollment in Student Teaching must be made by April 1 for the fall semester, or by October 1 for the spring semester.

Prerequisites: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program; student must submit application and be cleared prior to student teaching;

corequisites: TEP 536 and TEP 586

TEP 576B, Clinical Practice II (Student Teaching, K-8), 2 Units

Students complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school K-8 classrooms, with assignments at the primary and intermediate level. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Students who successfully complete student teaching and meet all CTC requirements and other applicable state requirements are recommended for SB 2042 Preliminary Multiple Subject Credential. Applications for enrollment in Student Teaching must be made by April 1 for the fall semester, or by October 1 for the spring semester.

Prerequisites: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program and TEP 576A;

corequisite: TEP 546

TEP 577A, Clinical Practice I (Contract Teaching, 7-12), 2 Units

Credit is given for a nine-week term in Fall I or Spring I of full-time supervised teaching in public schools as an intern teacher under contract. With permission granted by the single subject program director, a teaching contract in a WASC-approved private school may be used for this requirement. The contracted teacher fulfills all responsibilities for which a beginning teacher is accountable with dual mentorship provided by both the university and school site.

Prerequisite: Admission to Single Subject Credential program; student must submit application and be cleared prior to intern teaching;

corequisite: TEP 547

TEP 577B, Clinical Practice II (Contract Teaching, 7-12), 2 Units

Credit is given for a nine-week term in Fall II or Spring II, of full-time supervised intern teaching in public schools as an intern teacher under contract. With permission granted by the single subject program director, a teaching contract in a WASC-approved private school may be used for this requirement. The contracted teacher fulfills all responsibilities for which a beginning teacher is accountable with dual mentorship provided by both the university and school site. The contracted teachers attend a mandatory seminar during TEP 577B to complete the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing requirements for the final Teacher Performance Assessment.

Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program; and TEP 577A;

corequisite: TEP 587

TEP 578A, Clinical Practice I (Student Teaching, 7-12), 2 Units

Students complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school 7-12 classrooms. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Students who successfully complete student teaching and meet all CTC requirements and other applicable state requirements are recommended for SB 2042 Preliminary Single Subject Credential. Applications for enrollment in Student Teaching must be made by April 1 for the fall semester, or by October 1 for the spring semester.

Prerequisites: Admission to Single Subject Credential program; student must submit application and be cleared prior to student teaching;

corequisite: TEP 548

TEP 578B, Clinical Practice II (Student Teaching, 7-12), 2 Units

Students complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school 7-12 classrooms. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Students who successfully complete student teaching and meet all CTC requirements and other applicable state requirements are recommended for SB 2042 Preliminary Single Subject Credential. Applications for enrollment in Student Teaching must be made by April 1 for the fall semester, or by October 1 for the spring semester.

Prerequisites: Admission to Single Subject Credential program and TEP 578A;

corequisite: TEP 588

TEP 585, Intern Teaching Seminar (K-8), 3 Units

The purpose of the seminar is to discuss challenges common to intern teachers in K-8 classrooms, and address individual concerns. Issues addressed in this course include, but are not limited to, classroom management, effective curriculum and lesson development, identification of learning strategies for special needs students and English language learners, California School Law and legal issues, and the implementation of the California Common Core State Standards (CCSS). This course is specifically designed for direct application of practice by intern teachers.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program, submission of the Clinical Practice application by the deadline and clearance by the department

corequisites: TEP 535 and TEP 575A

TEP 586, Student Teaching Seminar (K-8), 3 Units

The purpose of the seminar is to discuss challenges common to student teachers in K-8 classrooms, and address individual concerns. Issues addressed in this course include, but are not limited to, classroom management, effective curriculum and lesson development, identification of learning strategies for special needs students and English language learners, California School Law and legal issues, and the implementation of the California Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential program, submission of the Clinical Practice application by the deadline and clearance by the department;

corequisites: TEP 536 and TEP 576A

TEP 587, Intern Teaching Seminar (7-12), 3 Units

The purpose of the seminar is to discuss challenges common to teacher candidates in 7-12 classrooms, and address individual concerns. Issues addressed in this course include, but are not limited to, teacher beliefs and their effect on student performance, classroom management, effective curriculum and lesson development, identification of learning strategies for special needs students and English language learners, California School Law and legal issues, and the implementation of current state and local standards and frameworks. This course is specifically designed for direct application of learning by intern teachers. This course assists students to prepare for the California Teaching Performance Assessment (TPA) Culminating Teaching Experience. This is not a TPA preparatory class, but materials and insights from this course assist students to engage the task. Grades from this class do not translate to grades for the TPA. They are two independent entities.

Prerequisite: A school placement for student teaching or an Internship is required for enrollment in the seminar. This course is offered for candidates who have applied and been cleared for clinical practice (student teacher or Intern) prior to the beginning of this class. If you have any questions about the status of your admission to the Teacher Education Program or your enrollment in this course, please call (626) 815-5344. Candidates complete a semester of full-time, supervised clinical practice in subject-matter appropriate public school 7-12 classrooms with all the responsibilities normally included in a teaching assignment;

corequisite: TEP 577B

TEP 588, Student Teaching Seminar (7-12), 3 Units

The purpose of the student teaching seminar is to discuss the challenges common to teacher candidates in 7-12 classrooms, and address individual concerns. Issues addressed in this course include, but are not limited to, teacher beliefs and their effect on student performance, classroom management, effective curriculum and lesson development, identification of learning strategies for special needs students and English language learners, California School Law and legal issues, and the implementation of current state and local standards and frameworks. This course assists students to prepare for the California Teaching Performance Assessment (TPA) Culminating Teaching Experience. This is not a TPA preparatory class, but materials and insights from this course assist students to engage the task. Grades from this class do not translate to grades for the TPA. They are two independent entities.

Prerequisite: A school placement for student teaching or an Internship is required for enrollment in the seminar. This course is offered for candidates who have applied and been cleared for clinical practice (student teacher or Intern) prior to the beginning of this class. If you have any questions about the status of your admission to the Teacher Education Program or your enrollment in this course, please call (626) 815-5344. Candidates complete a semester of full-time, supervised clinical practice in subject-matter appropriate public school 7-12 classrooms with all the responsibilities normally included in a teaching assignment.

Corequisite: TEP578B

TEP 590, Intern Supervision and Support, 1 Unit

This online course is required for candidates who have already completed requisite coursework and are serving on an intern credential without having met remaining requirements necessary to secure a Preliminary Teaching Credential. This course allows interns to continue to work toward meeting requirements while receiving mandated supervision and support. May be repeated four (4) times for credit.

TESP 505, Educational Foundations (K-12), 3 Units

This course introduces students to the art and profession of teaching as they study the historical, philosophical, political, and legal foundations of education in America. Students also reflect on themselves as teachers, extend and evaluate their personal philosophies of education, and explore their position on major issues, concerns, and challenges in schools today and for the future. Included are tools related to survival pedagogy including classroom management, introduction to general methods for effective lesson planning and teaching, implementation of California Common Core State Standards (CCSS). This course is specifically designed for direct application of practice by intern teachers.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject, Single Subject or Special Education Credential programs; Multiple Subject

corequisites: TESP 515 and TEP 565A; Single Subject

corequisites: TEP 517 and TEP 567A; Special Education

corequisites: TESP 515 and SPED 565A

TESP 506, Educational Foundations (K-12), 3 Units

This course introduces students to the art and profession of teaching as they study the historical, philosophical, political, and legal foundations of education in America. Students also reflect on themselves as teachers, extend and evaluate their personal philosophies of education, and explore their position on major issues, concerns, and challenges in schools today and for the future. Included are tools related to survival pedagogy including classroom management, introduction to general methods for effective lesson planning and teaching, implementation of California Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject, Single Subject or Special Education Credential programs; Multiple Subject

corequisites: TESP 516 and TEP 566A; Single Subject

corequisites: TEP 518 and TEP 568A; Special Education

corequisites: TESP 516 and SPED 566A

TESP 515, Clinical Experiences in Teaching Reading and Writing (K-12), 3 Units

This course covers the content and methodology of a comprehensive reading program, which include, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, writing, the four communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and the English-language arts Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Specific content knowledge needed in preparation for RICA is also covered in this course. This course is specifically designed for direct application of practice by intern teachers.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject or Special Education Credential programs; Multiple Subject

corequisites: TESP 505 and TEP 565A; Special Education

corequisites: TESP 505 and SPED 565A

TESP 516, Clinical Experiences in Teaching Reading and Writing (K-12), 3 Units

This course covers the content and methodology of a comprehensive reading program, which include, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, writing, the four communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and the English-language arts Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Specific content knowledge needed in preparation for RICA is also covered in this course.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject or Special Education Credential programs; Multiple Subject

corequisites: TESP 506 and TEP 566A; Special Education

corequisites: TESP 506 and SPED 566A

TESP 555, Clinical Experiences in Teaching English Language Learners (K-12), 3 Units

This course affords teacher candidates opportunities to learn and communicate knowledge and strategies for working with English language learners. This includes examining and experiencing teaching strategies and materials for developing students' receptive and expressive language skills, as well as academic language critical thinking skills. An introduction to theory and principles of second language acquisition, and practice in using SDAIE and ELD strategies form a portion of the course content. Participants examine the most recent California adopted English language and academic content standards for effective instructional design for English learners. This course examines the interactions between students' cultural, linguistic, and ability backgrounds and the wider educational and social community settings. Participants explore culturally responsive teaching strategies that support and enhance educational success for students of diversity and gain knowledge of issues related to cultural contact and cross-cultural interactions. This course assists students to prepare acquire skills for engaging the California Teaching Californian Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) Designing Instruction. This is not a TPA preparatory class, but materials and insights from this course class assist students to engage the task. Grades from this class do not translate to grades for the TPA. They are two independent entities. This course is specifically designed for direct application of practice by intern teachers.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject, Single Subject or Special Education Credential programs; Multiple Subject

corequisites: TEP 525 and TEP 565B; Single Subject

corequisites: TEP 527 and TEP 567B; Special Education

corequisites: SPED 565B

TESP 556, Methods of Teaching English Language Learners (K-12), 3 Units

This course affords teacher candidates opportunities to learn and communicate knowledge and strategies for working with English learners. This includes examining and experiencing teaching strategies and materials for developing students' receptive and expressive language skills, as well as academic language skills. An introduction to theory and principles of second language acquisition, and practice in using SDAIE and ELD strategies form a portion of the course content. Participants examine the most recent California adopted English language and academic content standards for effective instructional design for English learners. This course examines the interactions between students' cultural, linguistic, and ability backgrounds and the wider educational and social community settings. Participants explore culturally responsive teaching strategies that support and enhance educational success for students of diversity and gain knowledge of issues related to cultural contact and cross-cultural interactions. This course assists students to prepare for the California Teaching Performance Assessment (TPA) Designing Instruction. This is not a TPA preparatory class, but materials and insights from this course assist students to engage the task. Grades from this class do not translate to grades for the TPA. They are two independent entities.

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject, Single Subject or Special Education Credential programs;

Corequisites: Multiple Subject TEP 526 and TEP 566B; Single Subject TEP 528 and TEP 568B; Special Education SPED 566B