Department of Social Work

Master of Social Work (MSW) Overview

Social workers help people manage and overcome some of life’s most difficult challenges, such as poverty, addiction, discrimination, physical and mental illness, and abuse. They provide individual, family, and group therapy; facilitate crisis prevention and intervention; advocate and participate in political action; provide management and leadership in social welfare and nonprofit agencies; and collaborate with communities to develop necessary social and economic resources. Social workers are especially committed to advancing social justice and increasing opportunities for vulnerable populations.

Accreditation

For more-detailed information about the Department of Social Work, visit apu.edu/bas/socialwork/.

Admission

University graduate admission and program acceptance requirements must be met before an application is complete (see the Admission to the University section of this catalog).

Program-specific application requirements are available online at apu.edu/graduateprofessionalcenter/admissions/requirements/program/.

International students have a separate application procedure. Contact the International Center at +1-626-812-3055 or visit apu.edu/international/.

MSW Program Mission and Goals

The following mission statement guides the MSW program:

The Master of Social Work (MSW) program develops competent advanced social work practitioners who can integrate the knowledge, values, and skills of social work to advance social justice and provide services to assist individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Grounded in the profession’s Code of Ethics and sensitivity to diversity, the MSW program is committed to excellence in teaching and scholarship, the integration of faith and learning, the development of professional leadership, and the strengthening of communities in local, national, and international contexts.

The following outcome goals are derived from this mission statement and the purposes of social work education congruent with accreditation standards:

  1. Graduates will exhibit competence in generalist and advanced social work practice with diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities, including appropriate uses of supervision, consultation, and discernment to seek necessary organizational change.
  2. Graduates will demonstrate knowledge, built on a liberal arts foundation, of the history of the social work profession and empirically supported theoretical frameworks that provide understanding of individual development and behavior across the life span and interactions among and between individuals and families, groups, organizations, and communities.
  3. Graduates will demonstrate critical thinking skills, skills related to the effective integration of research in practice, and adequate preparation for leadership, advanced study, and lifelong learning.
  4. Graduates will demonstrate knowledge and skills to partner with communities to advocate the development of policies and programs that seek to advance human rights and well-being, promote social and economic justice, empower clients, and respect diversity.
  5. Graduates will practice according to the values and ethics of the profession and effectively and ethically integrate Christian faith in practice, including nondiscrimination in the areas of age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.
  6. Faculty will engage in ongoing scholarship reflecting the goals and needs of professional social work practice.

Foundation Competencies EPAS 2015

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities f the profession. Social works also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice. Social workers:

  • make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulation, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context;

  • use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations;

  • demonstrates professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication;

  • use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes; and

  • use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a cultures’ structures and values, including, social, economic, political, and culture exclusions, may recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate or create privilege and power. Social workers:

  • apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping the experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels;
  • present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences; and

  • apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, and adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies deigned to eliminate oppressive, environmental, economic, social and cultural human rights are protected. Social workers:

  • apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels; and
  • engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 4: Engage in Practice-Informed Research and Research-Informed Practice

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multi disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the process for translating research:

  • use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry ad research;
  • apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative research methods and research findings; and

  • use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy, and service delivery.

Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structure of social policies and services, the role of policy in service deliver, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice in practice settings at micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation. Social workers:

  • identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services;

  • assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services; and

  • apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilities engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective may impact their ability to effectively engage with diverse clients and constituencies. Social workers value principles of relationship-building and inter-professional collaboration to facilitate engagement with clients, constituencies and other professional as appropriate. Social workers:

  • apply knowledge to human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies; and
  • use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision making. Social workers:

  • collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies;
  • apply knowledgeable of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies;

  • develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients ad constituencies; and
  • select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence-informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment , and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing, and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration. Social workers:

  • critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies;

  • apply knowledgeable of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the interventions with clients and constituencies;

  • use interprofessional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes; and

  • facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals.

Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness. Social workers:

  • select and use appropriate method for evaluation of outcomes;
  • apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluations of outcomes;
  • critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes; and
  • apply evaluation findings to improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

Competency 10: Demonstrate Ethical Integration of Faith and Spirituality in Social Work Practice

Social workers understand the role of spirituality and faith as part of a holistic approach to social work practice and in understanding human behavior and the social environment. Social workers apply ethical principles in the integration of faith in practice, mindful of their own beliefs and their impact on the helping relationship. Social workers recognize that faith communities are part of the cultural context of individuals, families, and communities, and provide protective as well as risk factors in the process of change. In this context, social workers articulate how Christian beliefs and values can be ethically integrated in professional social work practice. Social workers:

  • demonstrate an understanding of a Christian worldview related to social work practice;
  • critically analyze how Christian, spiritual, or religious traditions assist or hinder the helping process;
  • demonstrate understanding of ethical integration of faith and spirituality in social work practice; and
  • understand the contributions and capacity of faith-based organizations and churches as resources in the delivery of social services.

Clinical Practice with Individuals and Families Competencies EPAS 2015

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

Social workers have a deep understanding and commitment to the value base of the profession, and can conceptualize and apply ethical standards and relevant laws and regulations to complex cases involving diverse populations and emerging technologies. Social workers demonstrate advanced critical thinking skills to examine and incorporate use of best-practice frameworks for decision making, including use of supervision. Social workers integrate the value base of the profession by reflecting on one’s own biases and values while considering interconnected ethical implications of assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning, and intervention. Social workers demonstrate effective regulation in working with clients while using professional judgment and behaviors, and engage in reflective and reflexive practices. Social workers demonstrate the ability to work in interprofessional teams, engaging in activities within the role and scope of practice of diverse social work settings. Social workers are aware of the importance of lifelong learning and demonstrate the ability to adapt to, learn about, and apply emerging forms of practice. They:

  • consistently apply and advance National Association of Social Workers (NASW) principles and code of ethics in ambiguous and complex practice situations;
  • recognize complex ethical considerations related to technology and practice; and
  • recognize the role and appropriate use of supervision and consultation in ethical decision making. 

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience as it applies to clinical practice with individuals, families, and groups. Social workers can identify the ways that practitioner and client cultural backgrounds and beliefs may affect clinical social work practice. Social workers are able to recognize and address stigma, access to care, and quality-of-care issues relating to diverse client groups by identifying structures and values that oppress and/or enhance privilege or power. Social workers are able to demonstrate advanced insight into personal biases and values and their influence on work with diverse clients, extending consistent dignity and respect to others. Social workers understand how cultural concepts of distress shape assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. They:

  • demonstrate and express how cultural concepts of distress and identity, as well as intersectionality, shape assessment, diagnosis, and treatment;
  • apply cultural humility and competence in adapting integrated services to meet diverse client needs; and
  • collaborate with and advocate for vulnerable and disempowered individuals, families, and groups so that services and resources are equitably accessed.

Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Social workers understand the importance of protecting fundamental human rights to end all forms of oppression. Mindful of every person’s fundamental right to self-determination, social workers help empower clients to navigate organizations and institutions in order to meet all their basic needs. Social workers are knowledgeable of best practices that help reduce and eradicate structural injustices within health, mental health, education, and community systems so that all individuals, particularly those who are vulnerable and oppressed, can lead healthy and thriving lives. They:

  • identify and develop strategies that help reduce and eliminate systemic forms of oppression an individual may experience in his/her community or institution;
  • integrate theories of human need and social justice in order to formulate policies that advance human rights for vulnerable populations; and
  • use knowledge of the effects of oppression, discrimination, and historical trauma on clients and client systems to guide treatment planning and intervention.

Competency 4: Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice

Social workers understand the evaluation methods of evidence-informed practice. They know how to consume and evaluate the quantitative and qualitative research literature on practice to remain informed of emerging practice trends. Social workers innovate new and effective intervention models, while identifying gaps in the research literature, particularly around disenfranchised, oppressed, and marginalized populations. They also recognize the philosophical limitations of current evidence-based research models. Social workers use best practices in research to design, analyze, and conduct their own research using quantitative or qualitative research methods. They:

  • evaluate the social work profession research base to inform theory, scientific inquiry, and research;
  • apply critical thinking to engage and develop a quantitative and qualitative research proposal question;
  • identify practice implications determined by evidence-informed research; and
  • use and translate research evidence to inform, improve, and innovate practice, policy, and service delivery.

Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice

Social workers understand the dynamic and political nature of clinical practice and apply interventions contextualized within a framework of advancing human rights within social welfare systems. Using a person-in-environment perspective, social workers understand how a client’s experience is directly impacted by local, state, or federal policies. Social workers actively engage in policy practice through advocacy and by implementing strategies that help effect change at the organizational and governmental levels. They:

  • identify how organizational and governmental policies impact the practice environment and the client’s ability to access services;
  • work alongside and on behalf of clients to influence service delivery through advocacy and legislative change; and
  • use evidence-informed practice and research-based evidence to advocate for policies that advance social and economic well-being. 

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand engagement as an integral component of clinical social work practice, and understand the importance of relationship as instrumental in the facilitation of the helping process. Social workers utilize interpersonal skills, knowledge of human behavior, and multiple theoretical frameworks to facilitate engagement with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. They:

  • demonstrate the ability to attend to the interpersonal dynamics and contextual factors that strengthen and potentially threaten the therapeutic alliance;
  • establish a relationally based process that encourages clients to be equal participants in the establishment of treatment goals and expected outcomes;
  • develop, manage, and maintain therapeutic relationships with clients within the person-in-environment and strengths perspective; and
  • utilize appropriate multidimensional assessment instruments.

Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers competently engage in detailed client assessment, recognizing that assessment is an ongoing, dynamic process. They engage in differential diagnosis, utilizing the DSM in a critical and responsible manner, and utilize the various aspects of a comprehensive assessment to accurately assess their clients. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness, and are knowledgeable about interprofessional collaboration, utilization of collateral contacts, and appropriate referral to supplemental services for their clients as needed. Social workers recognize how agency setting, clinical bias, and cultural differences affect assessment and diagnosis. They:

  • perform detailed client assessment and utilize critical thinking to arrive at accurate diagnoses and treatment plans;
  • select appropriate intervention strategies and treatment modalities based on accurate cultural formulation and assessment of their client’s presenting problems; and
  • critically apply diagnostic classification systems in a process of continuous assessment.

Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers demonstrate advanced skills in assessment and diagnosis in order to determine appropriate application of human behavior and practice theories that inform intervention within family contexts. Social workers link interventions to problems, applying best-practice interventions throughout the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with diverse family populations. Social workers apply critical thinking and trauma theory, and demonstrate the ability to respond to, assess, and intervene with crises and trauma at the individual, family, and community levels. Social workers engage in interprofessional and collaborative teams and within systems impacting mental health in order to advocate for, inform, and achieve client or community goals. They:

  • critically select and apply best practices, evidence-based interventions, and appropriate clinical techniques for a range of presenting concerns identified in the assessment of individuals and families in diverse situations;
  • demonstrate understanding of theories informing assessment of and interventions with families in diverse situations;
  • demonstrate the ability to identify crises and the appropriate use of crisis intervention and prevention strategies as needed; and
  • collaborate effectively with other professionals to coordinate treatment interventions and appropriate advocacy.

Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers competently engage in an ongoing evaluation of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice, recognizing the diversity that exists in serving individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Understanding the integral relationship between processes and outcomes, social workers apply multidimensional methods of evaluation to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness, using qualitative and quantitative outcomes measures. In doing so, social workers incorporate a thorough understanding of human behavior and the social environment in evaluating the effectiveness of applied interventions. They:

  • use clinical evaluation of the process and/or outcomes to develop best-practice interventions for a range of bio-psycho-social-spiritual conditions; and
  • utilize outcomes data to evaluate effectiveness of applied interventions.

Competency 10: Demonstrate Ethical Integration of Faith and Spirituality in Social Work Practice

Social workers deeply understand the role of spirituality and faith as part of a holistic approach to social work practice, particularly in understanding human behavior and the social environment. Social workers competently engage in assessing and diagnosing multifaceted needs by applying a bio-psycho-social-spiritual framework. Guided by ethics and cultural humility, social workers respect differences and professional boundaries while incorporating spirituality and faith in their clinical work with individuals, families, groups, and communities. They critically evaluate the role that Christian beliefs and values play in the helping process.

  • Use critical thinking skills to apply Christian beliefs and values, as appropriate, to client needs, in an ethical manner.
  • Apply bio-psycho-social-spiritual assessment skills as applicable to practice contexts.
  • Integrate clients’ religious, spiritual, and faith traditions and/or faith communities, as indicated, to enhance recovery.

Community Leadership and Program Administration Competencies EPAS 2015

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

Social workers have a deep understanding and commitment to the value base of the profession, particularly the commitment to advance social justice. Social workers understand the person-in-environment perspective, and possess advanced understanding of how to apply ethical standards and relevant laws and regulations to micro, mezzo, and macro practice situations. Social workers apply critical thinking and ethical frameworks to complex decision making in community practice, including the research and policy arenas. Social workers demonstrate advanced awareness of personal biases and influences and maintain professional judgment when practicing with diverse organizations and communities. Macro social workers understand the roles and responsibilities of managers in social welfare organizations, community organizers in neighborhoods, and policy advocates in state, national, and international governance. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology, including social media, data information systems, and analytics software, and take great ethical consideration in the application of such technology. They:

  • demonstrate advanced insight in personal reflection and self-regulation to maintain professionalism;
  • use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations;
  • demonstrate ability to effectively communicate orally and in writing when assuming a leadership role and when collaborating with other professionals;
  • use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior;
  • apply ethical decision-making skills to address complex and ambiguous practice situations; and
  • utilize technology ethically and appropriately when conducting research, tracking quality of service delivery, and facilitating program outcomes.

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience as it applies to an individual’s experience within their larger social and cultural environment. Social workers are committed to the promotion of equal social and economic rights across all dimensions of diversity and within local, organizational, and policy arenas, recognizing the roles that privilege and discrimination have in determining the access and allocation of societal resources. Social workers are knowledgeable about challenging and rectifying organizational and structural forms of oppression, and ensure that communities, organizations, and policies are sensitive to and knowledgeable of the unique and diverse needs of their clients and constituencies. They:

  • ensure the cultural competencies of programs and policies by recognizing the similarities and differences between the values and norms of the dominant society and those of oppressed, underserved, and underrepresented populations;
  • collaborate with and advocate for vulnerable and disempowered communities so that power and resources are equitably distributed; and
  • apply cultural humility in the examination of personal biases and values and their influence on work with diverse clients and constituencies, extending consistent dignity and respect to others.

Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Social workers understand the foundational functions of the United Nations’ universal human rights treaties for the protection of the civil, political, social, economic, educational, health, and ecological rights of individuals, communities, and sovereign nations. Social workers understand the role of cultural relativism as applied to diverse norms and values, exhibited across multicultural global populations. Social workers understand the impact of globalization on poverty, environmental resources, climate change, and the mechanisms for local and global governance as related to social policy development. They:

  • integrate human rights principles for elimination of oppressive structures when developing social policies on community, state, federal, and global levels;
  • apply theoretical, political, economic, and social sciences frameworks when analyzing human rights and social justice issues; and
  • engage in research-informed advocacy for the rights of diverse population groups to establish social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 4: Engage in Practice-Informed Research and Research-Informed Practice

Social workers recognize how multiple forms of knowing and their associated research methodologies help inform how evidence is developed and used to inform data-driven programmatic and policy development and implementation. Social workers understand the conceptual and operational links between program and policy design and its impact on the clients and constituencies they are designed to serve. They:

  • use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy, and service delivery;
  • create scientifically rigorous inquiries to create, plan, and evaluate programs and policies; and
  • articulate the tensions between practice wisdom and research evidence when making practice decisions.

Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice

Social workers understand the operationalization of social policies into equitable and effective service delivery. Social workers understand the foundational functions of human rights and social justice principles as they apply to social welfare and social services policies. Social workers understand the fundamental strategies, including engagement of stakeholders, political advocacy, and policy creation and analysis, for the establishment of social, economic, and environmental justice. They:

  • assess and analyze the formative effect of organizational, ideological, religious, economic, and political factors on domestic and global social policies;
  • implement sustainable development principles in the analysis and development of domestic and global social policies and programs; and
  • engage multiple stakeholders in social policy development and implementation on community, state, federal, and global levels.

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that engagement is a critical component of social work practice and specialize in connecting with groups, organizations, and communities utilizing theoretical practice models for engaging in the change process. Social workers establish relationships by analyzing relevant systems and identifying potential stakeholders. Social workers are committed to engagement with diverse clients and constituencies to enhance assessment and improve effectiveness of interventions. They:

  • use interpersonal skills to engage constituents in the change process;
  • pursue reciprocal relationships to develop desired outcomes and expectations; and
  • collaborate effectively with constituents to facilitate sustainable change.

Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that assessment is contextual and is an ongoing component of effective social work practice among groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers collect information through identified stakeholders within critical systems, and are committed to effective assessment among diverse clients and constituencies to enhance the effectiveness of interventions. Social workers apply relevant theoretical and evidence-informed practice models in assessment of groups, organizations, and communities. They:

  • research, collect, analyze, and interpret system policy and community and organizational data to inform assessment and intervention strategies;
  • select and modify appropriate intervention strategies based on evidence and continuous assessment;
  • mutually develop agreed-upon goals and measurable objectives; and
  • initiate strategies and/or actions to achieve goals and objectives within the context of the organization, community, and/or policy arenas.

Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice and specialize in interventions relevant to groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable of and apply evidence-informed interventions that are grounded in participatory methods. Social workers in macro practice understand the importance of acknowledging systems and power structures to best promote change and recognize the value of place-based initiative. Social workers are specifically skilled in advocacy, facilitation, policy practice, administration, and development of intervention strategies within groups, organizations, and communities. They:

  • develop intervention goals and design and implement a plan of action in collaboration with individuals, groups, organizations, and communities;
  • plan for the use of models, methods, and strategies that are appropriate to the local, regional, national, and international context; and
  • identify power structures and use consensus building to enhance service implementation.

Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of ensuring effective practice with groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers recognize stakeholders in the development of evaluation methods and ensure that a broad range of qualitative and quantitative measures are utilized. Social workers in macro practice understand data collection, analysis, interpretation, and application related to program and policy evaluation, and are committed to the dissemination of outcomes of intervention strategies to enhance evidence-informed practice. They:

  • establish and/or ensure that measurable evaluation criteria and methods are being utilized within change efforts;
  • collect, analyze, and interpret system, policy, community, and organizational data relevant to intervention evaluation; and
  • utilize evaluation data in collaboration with constituents to select and modify appropriate intervention strategies for enhanced benefit to client systems.

Competency 10: Articulate How Christian Beliefs and Values Can be Ethically Integrated in Professional Social Work Practice

Social workers understand how Christian beliefs and values can be ethically integrated into professional social work practice, and are knowledgeable about the capacity of faith-based organizations and churches as resources in the delivery of social services. Social workers understand the ethical integration of personal faith and core values as social workers, and recognize the contributions of the global Christian community in promoting social justice. They:

  • critically evaluate the strengths and challenges of faith-based organizations and churches in the delivery of client services;
  • demonstrate understanding of the ethical integration of personal faith and core values when working with organizations, communities, and policy arenas; and
  • identify ways in which social justice is enhanced and supported by the global Christian community.

SOCW 511, Introduction to the Social Work Profession, 2 Units

Content focuses on the history, identity, values, ethics, scope of practice, and knowledge base of the social work profession. Students explore ways their own backgrounds and beliefs are likely to influence professional activities, and examine the specific relationship of faith perspectives to social welfare policy and practice. Attention is given to developing professional writing and critical thinking skills.

Prerequisite: Admission to MSW program

SOCW 512, Social Welfare Policy and Policy Practice, 3 Units

The course provides an introduction to American social welfare policies, offers a historical overview of political influences on social work practice, and presents different models for political advocacy. Content focuses on political and client advocacy with attention to the relevance of professional ethical standards and faith perspectives to policy practice.

Prerequisite: Admission to MSW program

SOCW 513, Micro-theory and Human Development, 3 Units

Content will focus on theories that inform micro-level social work practice with individuals and families using a bio-psychosocial and spiritual framework. Human development across the life course is addressed with psychosocial theory's life stages to assist with the contextualization and integration of theories to meet the needs of diverse populations in practice.

Prerequisite: Admission to the MSW program

SOCW 514, Practice I - Interviewing and Assessment, 3 Units

This course begins a two-course sequence that provides the foundation for social work practice with individuals and families. Content includes legal and ethical practice, stages of the helping process, interviewing and assessment skills with adults, children, and families, clinical assessment and diagnosis using the DSM, and strategies for critically analyzing and sharing assessment information.

Prerequisite: Admission to MSW program

SOCW 515, Field Seminar I, 1 Unit

Field seminars meet in conjunction with field coursework and provide students opportunities to discuss practice situations, professional development issues, the relationship of field to classroom learning, and skills necessary for effective practice. Foundation year field seminars (I and II) focus on beginning social work practice skills, understanding agency and community context, and professional ethics.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Social Work program;

corequisite: SOCW 516

SOCW 516, Field I, 3 Units

The purpose of field internship is to provide a professional setting for students to practice generalist foundation social work skills and to provide an opportunity for the integration of knowledge, skills, values, and ethical faith integration in practice. Students complete a minimum of 480 hours by the end of semester I and semester II at an approved and designated social welfare agency.

Prerequisite: Admission to MSW program;

corequisite: SOCW 515

SOCW 521, Introductory Research Methods, 2 Units

Content will introduce critical evaluation of social work research and evidence informed social work practice, along with how research can ethically be used to improve practice at individual and agency levels. Concepts include: problem identification, hypothesis formulation, measurement, sampling, qualitative and quantitative research designs, data collection methods, data analysis, and program evaluation. Students will explore how science, scholarship, and the politics of knowledge development can facilitate the mission of social work.

Prerequisite: Statistic course

SOCW 522, Diversity and Social Justice, 3 Units

Content will focus on diverse populations in American society and ways historical and contemporary patterns of oppression and discrimination may influence social work practice. Specific attention is given to self-awareness and to professional commitments to marginalized groups and processes of advocacy, coalition-building, and other ways of developing effective alliances to promote social justice.

Prerequisite: Admission to MSW program

SOCW 523, Macro-theory and Communities/Organizations, 3 Units

Content will focus on macro-level theories and social work practice with organizations and communities. Models of practice that include comprehensive assessment, integrating an understanding of various forms and mechanisms of discrimination and oppression and their relevance to macro-level interventions, will be examined. Social work with organizations and communities embraces efforts to protect human and civil rights for the advancement of social and economic justice.

Prerequisite: SOCW 513

SOCW 524, Practice II - Intervention and Evaluation, 3 Units

This course ends a two-course sequence that provides the foundation for social work practice with individuals and families. Content includes goal-setting and contracting, planning and implementing change strategies, utilizing evidence-based practice research, interdisciplinary collaboration, advocacy, resource development, and practice evaluation.

Prerequisite: SOCW 514

SOCW 525, Field Seminar II, 1 Unit

Field seminars meet in conjunction with field coursework and provide students opportunities to discuss practice situations, professional development issues, the relationship of field to classroom learning, and skills necessary for effective practice. Foundation year field seminars (I and II) focus on beginning social work practice skills, knowledge and use of self, and professional ethics.

Prerequisites: SOCW 514, SOCW 515, and SOCW 516;

corequisite: SOCW 526

SOCW 526, Field II, 3 Units

The purpose of field internship is to provide a professional setting for students to practice generalist foundation practice skills and to provide an opportunity for the integration of knowledge, skills, values, and ethical faith integration in practice. Students complete a minimum of 480 hours by the end of semester I and semester II at an approved and designated social welfare agency.

Prerequisites: Admission to MSW program, SOCW 515, and SOCW 516;

corequisite: SOCW 525

SOCW 527, Research for Evidence-informed Practice, 2 Units

The content of this course prepares students to critically evaluate social work research and evidence-informed social work practice, along with the ethical use of research methods to improve clinical practice. Concepts include problem identification, hypothesis formulation, measurement, sampling, qualitative and quantitative research designs, data collection methods, data analysis, and outcomes evaluation. Students explore how science, scholarship, and the politics of knowledge development can facilitate the mission of social work.

Prerequisite: Statistics course

SOCW 528, Research for Data Driven Change, 2 Units

This course will introduce critical evaluation of social work research and its ethical application towards data-driven decision-making within community practice settings. Concepts include: problem identification, hypothesis formulation, measurement, sampling, research design, data collection methods, data analysis, and program evaluation. Students will explore how science, scholarship, and the politics of knowledge development can facilitate the mission of social work.

Prerequisite: Statistics Course

SOCW 529, Human Rights and Sustainable Development Policy, 3 Units

Content will focus on the relevance of human rights and sustainable development policy to macro-level social work practice in the U.S. and abroad. Topics will include advancement of human rights for social, economic and environmental justice and sustainable development strategies for poverty alleviation, universal education, public health, sanitation and housing, food security, access to clean water, population control and climate change. Analysis of existing global social policies will apply existing political, ideological, religious, cultural, age, and gender frameworks to explain current conditions and future trends. Secular and Christian perspectives will be explored.

Prerequisites: SOCW 522 and SOCW 523

SOCW 530, Organizing for Community Change, 2 Units

This course expands foundation year macro-level practice content to enhance theoretical understanding and develop skills in the promotion of community, organizational, and policy change to enhance social well-being and advance social justice. Special attention is focused on collaborative efforts, coalition building and participatory methods to facilitate sustainable change. Additional topics include assessment of social service delivery systems, advocacy, and professional ethics in macro practice. The importance of engaging diverse communities, recognition of underrepresented and underserved populations, and utilizing cultural humility in practice are emphasized.

Prerequisite: SOCW 523

SOCW 531, Human Rights and Sustainable Development, 2 Units

Content will focus on the relevance of human rights and sustainable development to macro-level social work practice in the U.S. and abroad. Topics will include advancement of human rights and economic justice, poverty alleviation, politics, religion, culture, age, gender, and public health conditions on human rights and development-related activities. Secular and Christian perspectives will be explored.

Prerequisites: SOCW 522 and SOCW 523

SOCW 532, Advanced Community Practice, 3 Units

This course expands foundation year macro-level practice content to include community entrance, engagement, participatory action research, and collaborative strategies to advance policies and programs supporting community interests and desired resources. Additional topics include empowerment, development of cultural competence, identification of oppressive cultural structures, globalization, and professional ethics. Engaging diverse communities and cultural humility are emphasized.

Prerequisite: SOCW 523

SOCW 533, Organizational Behavior and Management, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of organizational behavior and effective management practices within the social service sector. Topics include: human resource/legal/ethical issues; employee diversity; organizational culture; conflict resolution; group behavior; employee training/development; hiring practices; employee motivation; budgeting; and managing organizational change. Emphasis is placed on professional written and verbal communication.

Prerequisite: SOCW 523

SOCW 534, Field Seminar III, 1 Unit

Field Seminar III focuses on presentation and discussion of student experiences in concentration field internships. Specific emphasis is placed on demonstration and evaluation of advanced practice skills, interventions, supervision use, cultural responsiveness, professional ethics, and faith integration issues addressed in coursework.

Prerequisites: SOCW 514, SOCW 515, SOCW 516, SOCW 524, SOCW 525, SOCW 526;

corequisite: SOCW 535 or SOCW 539

SOCW 535, Field III - Community Leadership and Program Administration, 3 Units

The purpose of field internship is to provide a setting for students to develop advanced community practice skills and an opportunity for the ethical integration of knowledge, skills, values, and faith in social work. Students complete a minimum of 480 hours (600 hours for Advanced Standing students) by the end of semester I and semester II at an approved and designated agency.

Prerequisites: SOCW 514, SOCW 515, SOCW 516, SOCW 524, SOCW 525, SOCW 526;

corequisite: SOCW 534

SOCW 536, Advanced Clinical Practice I: Adult Mental Health, 3 Units

This course begins a two-semester advanced clinical practice sequence focusing on adult mental health. Content includes further knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, symptoms, diagnoses, assessment and treatment strategies associated with psychiatric conditions, brain functioning and chemistry, psychotropic medications, and managed care expectations. Secular theoretical and Christian counseling perspectives are integrated throughout the course.

Prerequisites: SOCW 514 and SOCW 524

SOCW 537, Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health and Diagnosis, 3 Units

This course focuses on behavioral health issues experienced by children and adolescents, and discussion of the effects of trauma on social and emotional development. Diagnostic issues affecting children and related treatment interventions are explored in the contexts of child welfare, school-based behavioral health, and healthcare settings. Research-informed approaches are taught, to improve functioning and well-being of children and adolescents. Laws impacting work with minors and families, as well as ethical issues for social work practitioners, are presented. Course content meets California education requirements in the area of child abuse assessment for LCSW licensure.

Prerequisites: SOCW 513, SOCW 514, and SOCW 524

SOCW 538, Clinical Practice with Groups, 2 Units

This course presents different theoretical approaches and treatment strategies associated with clinical social work practice with groups. Topics of group development stages, professional ethics in practice with groups, leadership principles, diversity issues, and evaluation methods are presented.

Prerequisites: SOCW 513, SOCW 514, and SOCW 524

SOCW 539, Field III-Clinical Practice, 3 Units

The purpose of field internship in the clinical specialization year is to provide a setting for students to develop advanced practice skills and an opportunity for the integration of knowledge, skills, and social work values as applied to clinical practice across the life span continuum. Students complete a minimum of 480 hours (or 600 hours for Advanced Standing students) by the end of fall and spring semesters at an approved and designated agency.

Prerequisites: SOCW 514, SOCW 515, SOCW 516, SOCW 524, SOCW 525, SOCW 526;

corequisite: SOCW 534

SOCW 541, Capstone Leadership Project, 3 Units

This course prepares students for professional leadership roles in social work settings and supports completion of the capstone leadership project. Content integrates development of leadership skills, self reflection, professional use of self, interprofessional practice, use of research to inform practice, and knowledge of program context to implement sustainable change in organizations. Professional ethics and decision making, which influence the leadership role in social work, are examined.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses and completion of first semester of specialization courses

SOCW 542, International Social Work Policy and Practice, 2 Units

Content will focus on international social work practice at multiple systems levels. Topics will include comparison of United States' and international social welfare policy, differing theoretical and religious perspectives, neo-liberal economic development policies, globalization, and issues immigrants and other marginalized groups. Practice content will address poverty alleviation, conflict and post-conflict reconstruction, displacement and forced migration concerns.

Prerequisites: SOCW 522, SOCW 523, SOCW 531, SOCW 532

SOCW 543, Fundraising, Grant Writing, and Fiscal Decision Making, 3 Units

This course prepares students for potential fundraising, grant writing, and fiscal decision-making responsibilities in human services organizations. Students work with local agencies and their administrators to assess and analyze funding resources, strategies, skills, and decision-making processes. Assignments focus on actual grant writing, participation in fundraising activities, and assessing fiscal priorities in the management of agency budgets.

SOCW 544, Field Seminar IV, 1 Unit

Field Seminar IV focuses on presentation and discussion of students experiences in concentration year field internships and preparation for masters-level social work employment and licensure. Specific emphasis is placed on critical thinking and communication of professional judgments, integration of theory, assessment, intervention, and evaluation, as well as professional development issues.

Prerequisites: SOCW 514, SOCW 515, SOCW 516, SOCW 524, SOCW 525, SOCW 526, SOCW 534, SOCW 535 or SOCW 539;

corequisite: SOCW 545 or SOCW 548

SOCW 545, Field IV - Community Leadership and Program Administration, 3 Units

Field internship provides a setting for students to utilize advanced community practice skills and an opportunity for the ethical integration of knowledge, skills, values, and faith in social work. Students complete a minimum of 480 hours (600 hours for Advanced Standing students) by the end of semester l and semester II at an approved and designated agency.

Prerequisites: SOCW 514, SOCW 515, SOCW 516, SOCW 524, SOCW 525, SOCW 526, SOCW 534, and SOCW 535;

corequisite: SOCW 544

SOCW 546, Family Therapy in Context, 3 Units

This course focuses on family practice contexts and theories of child welfare and family therapy. Content includes social worker roles and scope of practice in child welfare practice, and current approaches to assisting families in the child welfare system. Also included is the demonstration and practice of family therapy, application of theory, and assessment and intervention on diverse family systems. The course addresses legal and ethical problem solving related to contemporary professional ethics and statutes and regulations related to family law.

Prerequisites: SOCW 536, SOCW 537

SOCW 547, Social Welfare Policy and Integrated Healthcare Practice, 2 Units

American social welfare policies relevant to health and behavioral health care are presented. The historical and social context of health and behavioral health care and the roles of the public and private sectors in shaping contemporary trends and issues, particularly among vulnerable communities, are considered. Topics include healthcare reform, integrated care, managed care, access/treatment disparities, advocacy and policy reform, and the recovery model.

Prerequisite: SOCW 512

SOCW 548, Field IV - Clinical Practice, 3 Units

Field internship provides a setting for students to develop advanced clinical practice skills and an opportunity for the ethical integration of knowledge, skills, values, and faith in social work. Students complete a minimum of 480 hours (600 hours for Advanced Standing students) by the end of semester l and semester II at an approved and designated agency.

Prerequisites: SOCW 514, SOCW 515, SOCW 516, SOCW 524, SOCW 525, SOCW 526, SOCW 539;

corequisite: SOCW 544

SOCW 550, Advanced Standing: Intermediate Praxis, 3 Units

Content focuses on theory/practice integration in professional social work. Students apply different worldviews and micro- and macro-level theories to case examples drawn from professional social work, and identify implications for intervention and evaluation. Models of practice involving diverse communities and social welfare organizations are explored.

Prerequisite: Admission to advanced standing MSW program;

Corequisite: SOCW 551

SOCW 551, Advanced Standing: Intermediate Research and Evidence-based Practice, 3 Units

This advanced standing course provides an overview of evidence-based practice models, used of diagnostic criteria and assessment strategies, and quantitative and qualitative research methods to inform practice. Assignments focus on legal ethical issues, documentation, assessment, and evaluation.

Prerequisites: Prior statistics course with grade of C or higher

SOCW 552, Program Planning and Evaluation, 3 Units

Systematic program planning with a focus on outcomes is a critical component in operating effective human service programs. Over the course of this semester, you will become familiar with program design and program evaluation methodologies, and the tools most commonly used to assess human service programs. Additional topics will include identification and use of performance measures, the roles of evaluators and stakeholders, the influence of the political environment, technology applications, and applicable ethics related to program design and evaluation. At the completion of this course you will be prepared to design and implement programs and conduct outcome evaluations to ensure program efficiency and effectiveness for clients, staff and external funding sources.

SOCW 561, Addictions: Assessment and Intervention, 3 Units

This course describes addictions from a bio-psycho-social-cultural-spiritual perspective, emphasizing assessment and intervention skills, processes, and evidence-based research relevant to treatment using the recovery model. Diversity issues involving policy and practice are explored. Course content is consistent with BBS education requirements in the area of substance abuse and dependency. Elective

SOCW 562, Urban Social Welfare, 3 Units

Course integrates on-site experiential learning with classroom education focused on urban issues of homelessness, gang involvement, and immigration. Students engage in weekly on-site learning activities in high-need areas of Los Angeles and Orange County. Content includes theological and sociological perspectives on urban issues as well as urban social work practice. Elective

SOCW 563, School Social Work, 3 Units

This course uses an ecological perspective to prepare students for school social work practice. Topics include historical, theoretical, legal, research, policy, and practice issues relevant to school social work services; the roles and tasks performed by social workers in schools; school social work practice models; and professional ethics. Elective

SOCW 564, Social Work and the Bible: Christian Perspectives on Service and Professional Practice, 3 Units

This course focuses on theological and social work perspectives on the relevance of the Bible to professional practice activities. Content addresses diverse Christian perspectives on social welfare policies and faith integration in different practice environments. Distinctions between professional social work, Christian counseling, and missionary activity are explored. Elective

SOCW 565, Clinical Spanish Practice in Social Work, 3 Units

This course will teach students to utilize clinical skills in Spanish. It will increase cultural competence and understanding of the Latino culture and its intragroup differences, which enables students to confront myths and stereotypes regarding this population. This class will be conducted primarily in Spanish. Students are encouraged to support each other in the development of language and clinical skills.

SOCW 566, Social Work, Health and Aging, 3 Units

This course explores concepts, social policies, resources, and interventions related to social work practice with the older adult population. Content integrates themes of diversity, ageism, empowerment, and faith; as well as community-based and cross-cultural competence. Course content includes a focus on biopsychosocial assessment, with emphasis on functional and cognitive status, integrated health care practice, interdisciplinary practice, and end of life care.

SOCW 567, Marital Therapy and Domestic Violence, 3 Units

This course is an overview of current theories, methods, and psychological instruments used in marriage therapy interventions. Content includes detection, assessment, and intervention strategies for spousal or partner abuse, meeting California requirements for training in the area of domestic and family violence for MFT and LCSW licensure. Students apply course material to role-play scenarios during class time. Attention is given to issues of ethnic diversity, blended families, and faith integration.

SOCW 568, Military Social Work, 3 Units

The purpose of this course is to understand the unique and complex needs of service members, veterans, and military families. This course presents knowledge and skills essential to effective social work practice. Topics range from military culture, ethical issues, diversity, faith integration, trauma, assessment, family issues, reintegration, domestic violence, substance abuse, homelessness, suicide, building resiliency, and clinical interventions for use in social work settings.

SOCW 569, Human Sexuality and Sex Therapy, 3 Units

This course reviews human sexuality as a basis for sex therapy and clinical social work involving sexuality issues. Students examine and evaluate biological, psychological, social, moral, and faith perspectives on sexual development and functioning. In addition, students survey literature on sexual dysfunction, and learn treatment strategies utilized in various social work contexts and systems of marital and sex therapy. This course meets California Board of Behavioral Sciences requirements for clinical social work licensure.

SOCW 570, International Social Work Policy and Practice, 3 Units

Content will focus on international social work practice at multiple systems levels. Topics will include comparison U.S. and international social welfare policies, different theoretical, economic, cultural, ideological and religious perspectives, neoliberal economic development policies, and issues involving immigrants and other marginalized groups. The impact of globalization and climate change on rapid urbanization and population growth will be discussed. Practice content will address poverty alleviation, conflict and post-conflict reconstruction, displacement and forced migration concerns.

SOCW 595, Special Topics, 1-6 Units

Special topics courses offer graduate-level content that is typically scheduled in an intensive format. These courses include a wide range of specialized topics relevant to professional social workers. The unit values of these courses range from 1-6 depending upon the specific contact hours and coursework load. Note: Elective offerings vary year to year.

SOCW 599, Readings in Social Work, 1-3 Units

Students enroll in this course to pursue independent study of professional interests/activities. Students explore topics in greater depth than in regular course offerings and/or initiate individual projects. Readings and assignments are based on learning contracts developed in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and approved by the MSW program director. Additional fees required.

Faculty

Department Chair

Mary Rawlings, Ph.D., LCSW

Director of MSW Program

Kimberly Setterlund, MSW, LCSW

Director of Field Education

Froylana Heredia-Miller, MSW, LCSW

Director of Student Services

Karen Maynard, M.A.

UCCF Coordinator

Virginia Olivas, MSW

Professor

Mary Rawlings, Ph.D., LCSW

Associate Professors

Shaynah Neshama, Ph.D., MSW

Jennifer S. Payne, Ph.D., LCSW

Assistant Professors

Froylana Heredia-Miller, MSW, LCSW

Margaret Lee, Ph.D., MSW

Karen Maynard, M.A.

Virginia Olivas, MSW

Kimberly Setterlund, MSW, LCSW

Olivia Sevilla, Ed.D., LCSW

Regina Trammel, Ph.D., LCSW (Illinois)

Jean Un, MSW, LCSW

Adjunct Faculty

Janet Agosti, Lecturer, MSW, LCSW

Rachel Bentley, Lecturer, MSW, LCSW

Jacquelyn Bradbard, Field Liaison, MSW, LCSW

Maria Carmichael, Field Liaison, MSW, LCSW

Laura Cravens, Field Liaison, MSW, LCSW

Lili Florez, Field Liaison, MSW, LCSW

Rhonda Gee, Field Liaison, MSW, LCSW

Rene Kavanagh, Lecturer, MSW, LCSW

Tiffany Kwong, Lecturer, MSW, LCSW

Catherine Fisher, Lecturer, MSW, LCSW

Alysha McCuistion, Lecturer, MSW, LCSW

Carol Montgomery, Lecturer, MFT

Adria Navarro, Lecturer, Ph.D., LCSW

Jill Shook, Lecturer, D.Min.

Josefina Sierra, Lecturer, MSW, LCSW

Richard Solano, Lecturer, M.A.

Robin Thomas, Lecturer, MSW, LCSW

Anne Wrotniewski, Field Liaison, MSW