Department of Physical Therapy

Accreditation

  • All Azusa Pacific University programs are accredited by the WASC Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC).
  • The Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Azusa Pacific University is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-1488; telephone: (703) 706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org; website: capteonline.org.

For more information about the Department of Physical Therapy, visit apu.edu/bas/physicaltherapy/.

PT 502, Professional Relationships, 2 Units

(30 contact hours) This course introduces the role of the physical therapist as a professional health educator. Emphasis is on developing interpersonal and communication skills in relation to the interaction between therapist and patient, other health professionals, and within groups.

PT 506, Seminar I, 2 Units

(30 contact hours) This course introduces the student to the physical therapy profession. Historical and legal issues, as well as practice settings and health care trends are addressed. Emphasis is placed on professional development and responsibility of the physical therapist as a lifelong learner.

PT 558, Research Methods in Physical Therapy, 3 Units

This course introduces the student to the concepts of Physical Therapy research. A survey of major research methods is conducted and statistical methods are examined.

PT 572, Pharmacology, 3 Units

This is an introduction to pharmacology which includes pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Emphasis is on drugs commonly encountered during rehabilitation. Side effects that alter physical performance and drug effects influenced by exercise are studied.

PT 701, Human Anatomy, 10 Units

This is a 16-week intensive course in clinically oriented human anatomy from a regional approach. Microscopic and gross human anatomy are explored utilizing lectures, classroom demonstrations, human cadaver dissections, dissection videos, and hands-on functional demonstrations. Biomechanics are studied from functional and clinical approaches. Emphasis is on histology, head, neck, upper extremity, and thorax during the first half of the term; the emphasis of the second half is on the spine, pelvis, lower extremity, spinal cord, and internal organs. Concurrent with PT 702.

PT 702, Clinical Skills I, 6 Units

First in a series of courses designed to examine basic evaluation and clinical skills of the physical therapist, this course focuses on objective techniques of assessment for the upper and lower extremity and spine through measurement of range of motion (ROM), muscle testing (MMT), general neurological screening, and palpation. Kinesiology of all joints is studied from functional and clinical approaches, concluding in the assessment of normal gait mechanics. An introduction to body mechanics and documentation is provided to prepare the student for safe clinical practice. Learning takes place through laboratory activities, homework, online videos, and practical examination using a problem-solving approach.

PT 703, Clinical Neuroscience, 6 Units

This course covers in depth the anatomy and physiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems and neuromuscular function, serving as a foundation for PT 704. It includes correlation of pathology with neurological symptoms and diagnostic tests.

PT 704, PTDDT III Neurorehabilitation, 8 Units

This course focuses on developing skills used for differential diagnosis, functional evaluation, treatment theory, and management of the neurologically impaired adult. This course examines the neurophysiologic rationale for treatment approaches commonly used in physical therapy treatment for the neurologically impaired patient. Emphasis is placed on integration and development of hands-on skills in a laboratory setting. Major areas investigated include spinal cord injury, stroke, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, polyneuropathies, and common degenerative diseases.

PT 711, Wellness I, 2 Units

This course is the first one of two focusing on the promotion of optimal health and disease and injury prevention in the general population. It addresses screening techniques and risk assessment, as well as tests and measures related to aerobic capacity, balance, flexibility, strength and endurance, and posture. Findings are applied to exercise prescription.

PT 724, PT Clinical Skills II, 3 Units

(60 contact hours) This is the second in a series of clinical skills courses and discusses the visual and electromagnetic spectrum instrumentation for the treatment of dysfunction. The focus is on physical agents in relation to treatment.

PT 726, PT Clinical Skills III, 1 Unit

(45 contact hours) In this clinical skills laboratory course, assistive devices, bed mobility, and transfer training are introduced. Measurement, selection, and adaptation of assistive devices are performed. Bed mobility and transfer training are performed and implemented based on patient diagnosis and need. Emphasis is on patient safety with handling as well as body mechanics and safety of the therapist. Information is reiterated with laboratory activities, case studies, and a practical and written examination using a problem-solving approach.

PT 728, PTDDT IA - Orthopedics I, 4 Units

(90 contact hours) This course emphasizes the general principles and methodology of rehabilitation of orthopedic patients. Examination of the lumbar spine, pelvis and hip are emphasized. Mobilization, therapeutic exercise programs, complete evaluation, disease processes, and documentation are addressed specifically per diagnosis.

PT 738, Wellness II, 2 Units

This course presents promotion of optimal heath and prevention of disease and physical impairment by incorporating the concepts of wellness and nutrition with education and prevention programs for individuals, groups, and communities. Fitness screening for different populations including methods of education in secondary and tertiary areas of need. Trends such as eating disorders and alternative medicine in relation to wellness and nutrition are addressed.

PT 742, Prosthetics and Orthotics, 2 Units

(60 contact hours) This course provides foundational knowledge of the types, uses, and fitting of prosthetic and orthotic devices. Rehabilitation intervention is addressed in regard to functional use, measurements, care, adjustments, precautions, and patient education for the appropriate device. Case studies, literature review, lecture, problem-solving models, videos, and laboratory practice are used.

PT 744, Professional Ethics, Advocacy, and Spiritual Care, 2 Units

(30 contact hours) The course examines the major ethical issues affecting the physical therapist and the health care profession. Through class and small-group discussions, the student examines his or her own moral values.

PT 746, PTDDT IB - Orthopedics II, 4 Units

(90 contact hours) This course emphasizes the general principles and methodology of rehabilitation of orthopedic patients. Examination of the knee, ankle, foot, cervical spine and thoracic spine are emphasized. Mobilization, therapeutic exercise programs, complete evaluation, disease processes, and documentation will be addressed specifically per diagnosis.

PT 748, PTDDT IC - Orthopedics III, 4 Units

(90 contact hours) This course emphasizes the general principles and methodology of rehabilitation of orthopedic patients. Examination of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, and Temperomandibular joint are emphasized. Mobilization, therapeutic exercise programs, complete evaluation, disease processes, and documentation will be addressed specifically per diagnosis.

PT 750, Comprehensive Exams, 1 Unit

This course gives the student an opportunity to demonstrate their qualifications to enter the clinical section of their physical therapy education.

PT 752, PTDDT II - Cardiopulmonary, 4 Units

(75 contact hours) This course reviews basic cardiopulmonary pathology and presents basic theories leading to decision-making skills in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. Presentation of case studies reinforce management of the patient with cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Practical application of theoretical concepts are emphasized.

PT 754, PTDDT IV, 3 Units

(General Medicine - 75 contact hours) This course provides the student with experience in the management of the general medicine patient with acute, chronic, and terminal disease. The laboratory portion of the course assists in developing clinical skills and reasoning to determine appropriate and safe therapeutic procedures and protocols for this population.

PT 758, Special Populations, 3 Units

(45 contact hours) This course addresses physical therapy management of special populations such as geriatric, cultural and ethically diverse populations, home health, and other special interest groups for physical therapy care. The student is responsible for designing physical therapy management for each area considered.

PT 760, PTDDT VIII - Pediatrics, 4 Units

(90 contact hours) This course provides the background knowledge needed to assess functional status, evaluate, and develop appropriate treatment programs for infants and children from premature birth to adolescence. Lab sessions held at a developmental center allow students to evaluate, develop a plan of care, and manage children under faculty supervision.

PT 762, Seminar II, 2 Units

(30 contact hours) The clinical performance instrument is reviewed in this course, and written and oral communication skills specific to the clinic are refined. Expectations of clinical professional behavior are also emphasized. The student presents an in-service on a specific evaluation or treatment approach to be used in the clinic, incorporating lecture and lab into instruction. The student's performance is self assessed, peer assessed, and evaluated by the instructor.

PT 764, PTDDT VII - Complex Patients: Current Concepts in Chronic Pain, 2 Units

(45 contact hours) The process of evidence-based review of the literature is applied to the management of complex patient cases emphasizing chronic pain.

PT 768, Administration, 3 Units

(75 contact hours) This course presents the basic components of administration, financial and staff management, marketing strategies, and public relations for clinical directors and/or owners. Administrative and contractual legal issues and reimbursement mechanisms are explored.

PT 771, Clinical Experience I, 12 Units

(480 contact hours) This is the first of three twelve-week clinical rotations providing integration of prior didactic work with full-time clinical exposure under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist.

PT 773, Clinical Experience II, 12 Units

(480 contact hours) This is the second of three twelve-week clinical rotations providing integration of prior didactic work with full-time clinical exposure under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist.

PT 774, Capstone I, 2 Units

In the first of the capstone course series, students choose a clinical question of interest and conduct an extensive literature review.

PT 775, Clinical Experience III, 12 Units

(480 contact hours) This is the third of three twelve-week clinical rotations providing integration of prior didactic work with full-time clinical exposure under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist.

PT 776, Capstone II, 2 Units

The second in the capstone series, research of the clinical question continues through faculty supervised collection and synthesis of data.

PT 778, Diagnostic Imaging, 3 Units

(45 contact hours) This course familiarizes the Doctor of Physical Therapy student with the indications, instrumentation, and clinical interpretation of orthopedic imaging techniques including plane film X-ray, magnetic resonance, computerized tomography, and radioisotope imaging. Selection protocols for each are discussed to acquaint the student with advantages and disadvantages of each method and what type of information each technique best presents. This course focuses on the clinical interpretation and practical integration of imaging data into rehabilitation treatment regimen design and communication with other medical professionals.

PT 779, Special Topics II, 2 Units

This is the second of two courses, which examine specialized topics/techniques of current interest for physical therapists. This course includes topics of men and womens' health, performing artist dysfunction, sport specific taping, and on field support for athletes. Lecture and hands on lab sessions will provide opportunities for the student to evaluate, develop and administer a plan of care in each of the specialty areas under faculty supervision.

PT 781, Integrated Clinical Education, 1 Unit

This course will allow the student to integrate didactic learning with a part time clinical experience under the supervision and mentorship of a licensed physical therapist.

PT 783, Integrated Community Service, 1 Unit

This course will allow the student to integrate didactic and clinical learning with clinical service to the global or local community under the mentorship and supervision of a licensed physical therapist.

PT 790, Physical Diagnosis Screening, 6 Units

This course prepares students to manage patients with multisystem dysfunction. They utilize various methods of physical examination to identify pathologies that are and are not amenable to physical therapy intervention.

PT 794, Fellowship I, 2 Units

This course is an integration of key movement approaches advocated by Shirley Sahrmann PT, Ph.D.; Vladimir Janda, MD, D.Sc.; and Pavel Kolar, PT, Ph.D., focusing on specific movement impairments in the spine and upper and lower quarters, including the interaction between the central nervous system and motor system in the production of movement, stability, and/or controlled mobility. This course also includes instruction in principles of biomechanics, ergonomics, and body proportions and their relationship to movement impairments that limit optimal performance of function.

PT 795, Fellowship II, 3 Units

This course builds on clinical reasoning skills with instruction/problem-solving discussion on intervention strategies for patients with complex rehabilitation issues including chronic pain. Application of the movement approach and strength and conditioning are applied to athletes with focus on running, rotation and overhead sports, contact sports, and performing artists.

Prerequisite: PT 794

PT 796, Fellowship III, 3 Units

This course builds on clinical reasoning skills with instruction/problem-solving discussion on intervention strategies for patients with complex rehabilitation issues, including rotation and overhead sports, contact sports, and performing artists. Application of the movement approach and strength and conditioning are applied to athletes.

PT 797, Fellowship IV, 2 Units

This course builds on clinical reasoning skills with instruction/problem-solving discussion on intervention strategies for patients with complex rehabilitation issues including concussions and vestibular issues. This course builds on clinical reasoning skills with instruction/problem-solving discussion on intervention strategies for patients with complex rehabilitation issues including concussions and vestibular issues.

Prerequisite: PT 796

PT 798, Special Topics I, 2 Units

This is the first of two courses which examine specialized topics/techniques of current interest for physical therapists. This course includes topics of movement science, basic taping techniques for the orthopedic and neurologic populations, ergonomics, wound care and lymphedema management. Lecture and hands on lab sessions will provide opportunities for the student to evaluate, develop and administer a plan of care in each of the specialty areas under faculty supervision.

PT 799, Independent Study, 1-6 Units

Students enroll in this course to pursue independent study investigating subjects and interests that lie beyond regular course offerings. The student explores topics in greater depth than in other courses and/or initiates an individual project. Readings are pursued in accordance with a study plan, which is developed in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and approved by the department chair.

Faculty

Chair and Professor

Susan Shore, PT, Ph.D.

Professor

Kathryn Kumagai Shimamura, PT, DPT, NCS, OCS, CSCS, FAAOMPT

Associate Professors

Wendy Chung, PT, D.Sc.

Daniel Farwell, PT, DPT

Michael Wong, PT, DPT, OCS

Assistant Professors

Tamara Eichelberger, PT, CSCS, Ph.D., NCS

Annette Karim, PT, DPT, Ph.D. (ABD), OCS, FAAOMPT

Grace Matsuda, PT, DPT

Chris Patterson, PT, DPT, OCS

Derrick G. Sueki, PT, DPT, Ph.D., OCS

Adjunct Faculty

Mark Baker, PT, DPT, OCS

Melissa Cole, DPT, CCS

Clare Frank, M.Sc., DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT

Jaclyn Harrison, DPT, NCS

Vicky Hu, PT, DPT, CCS, CSCS

Marshall LeMoine, DPT, OCS

Amanda McCoid, DPT

Zachary McGill, PT, DPT, MPH, OCS

Charmayne Ross, PT, D.Sc.

Claire Smith, PT, DPT, NCS