Department of Kinesiology

Department Overview

The Department of Kinesiology offers graduate programs in athletic training and physical education, using discipline-based approaches grounded in a Christian worldview to graduate men and women who are academically engaged, relationally centered, vocationally aware, and wellness oriented.

The Master of Science in Athletic Training (MSAT) prepares students for careers in athletic training. The men and women of this service profession desire to enhance the quality of health care for patients and physically active individuals, specializing in the prevention, assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses encountered by all individuals, especially the physically active. 

The Master of Science in Physical Education equips candidates with the knowledge and skills needed to teach physical education, administrate athletic programs, and coach at the K-12, junior college, and four-year university levels. This degree is also available online and with an emphasis in sport management.

The Master of Arts in Physical Education and Single Subject Teaching Credential program equips students with the skills and knowledge needed to teach physical education and coach at the K-12, junior college, and four-year university levels. In addition to the master’s degree, students earn a 2042 Single Subject Teaching Credential, preparing them for positions at the middle and high school levels (7-12) and as pre-K-12 specialists in physical education.

The Master of Arts in Physical Education with an Added Authorization in Adapted Physical Education program is designed for candidates who possess a teaching credential in physical education and are also seeking to teach adapted physical education in the pre-K-12 and/or community college systems.

The Adapted Physical Education Added Authorization enables the physical education teacher to teach disabled students ranging from preschool through adult school, conduct assessments, and report findings through the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process.

Accreditation

AT 511, Foundations of Athletic Training, 5 Units

This course provides students with basic information and skills necessary in the clinical practice of athletic training. Topics include acute care, risk management, orthopedic taping and wrapping, and equipment fitting. Students will also learn the roles and responsibilities of a certified athletic trainer and the sports medicine team. Students are also introduced to evidence-based practice concepts. A laboratory component is included.

AT 515, Anatomical Basis of Athletic Training, 4 Units

This course provides an in-depth look at human anatomy, with an emphasis on musculoskeletal anatomy, functional anatomy, and basic kinesiology principles. The lab component will include the use of cadavers.

AT 521, Orthopedic Assessment and Diagnosis I, 3 Units

This is the first of two courses that include an in-depth inquiry into the pathophysiology of injuries to the physically active. This course emphasizes injuries to the trunk and lower extremity. Mechanisms of injury will be addressed as well as specific evaluation techniques and methods standard to the practice of athletic training. A laboratory component is included.

AT 523, Therapeutic Modalities, 3 Units

This course focuses on the theory and operation of various therapeutic modalities as they relate to the healing process and are used in the treatment of injuries to physically active individuals. Included are hydrotherapy, electrotherapy, thermotherapy, cryotherapy, therapeutic massage, and other manual and mechanical techniques. A laboratory component is included.

AT 525, Research Methods I, 3 Units

This is the first of two courses in research methodology. The focus of this course is on the critical reading of athletic training and sports medicine literature, the interpretation of research, and the analysis of research methodology appropriate to the field. In addition, students will create a research proposal as the first step toward their thesis.

AT 527, Clinical Integration I, 2 Units

This is the first of five clinical education courses. Each student will be assigned to a preceptor who directly supervises them as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they will be given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

AT 532, Orthopedic Assessment and Diagnosis II, 3 Units

This is the second of two courses that include an in-depth inquiry into the pathophysiology of injuries to the physically active. This course emphasizes injuries to the upper extremity, head, and cervical spine. Mechanisms of injury will be addressed as well as specific evaluation techniques and methods standard to the practice of athletic training. A laboratory component is included.

AT 534, Biomechanics, 3 Units

This course focuses on qualitative and quantitative analysis of human movement. Screenings and calculations will focus on skills common in sport and physical activity as well as gait analysis by the application of principles of anatomy, kinesiology, and physics.

AT 536, Research Methods II, 3 Units

This is the second of two courses in research methods. The focus of this course is on statistical concepts with the emphasis on correct usage and interpretation, using spreadsheets and computer analysis. In addition, students will have the opportunity to explore advanced research methodology, specific to their chosen research.

AT 538, Clinical Integration II, 2 Units

This is the second of five clinical education courses. Each student will be assigned a preceptor who directly supervises then as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they will be given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

AT 541, Nutrition for Active People, 2 Units

This course focuses on nutrition related to exercise and physical performance. These aspects include the energy systems in exercise, nutritional aspects of substrate utilization (digestion, absorption, metabolism, etc.), assessment of nutritional needs, and diet modification. Dietary development for weight loss, body composition changes, and performance will be covered from a nutritional viewpoint.

AT 543, Strength and Conditioning, 3 Units

This course uses a scientific and integrated approach to the assessment, development, implementation, and management of strengthening and conditioning. A laboratory component is included.

AT 545, Topics in Athletic Training, 3 Units

This course offers students the opportunity to discuss current trends from the literature and practice of athletic training. Topics may include: clinical and classroom learning styles and methods of assessment, emerging evaluation and treatment strategies, alternative medicine, ethics, cultural competence, and technology in medicine.

AT 547, Clinical Integration III, 2 Units

This is the third of five clinical education courses. Each student will be assigned to a preceptor who directly supervises them as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they will be given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

AT 549, Applied Research I, 1 Unit

In this course, students meet with their research team and mentor to identify a clinical question of interest, conduct a literature review, and plan the methods and data collection for their research project.

AT 551, Medical Conditions and Pharmacology, 3 Units

This course covers the knowledge, skills, and values that the entry-level certified athletic trainer must possess to recognize, treat, and refer, when appropriate, the general medical conditions and disabilities of those involved in athletics or other physical activities. Pharmacology is included as related to medical conditions and disabilities of the active, as well as ergogenic aids common to the population. A laboratory component is included.

AT 553, Psychological and Spiritual Aspects of Injury and Illness, 3 Units

The purpose of this course is to provide the necessary knowledge and skills to manage psychosocial issues in athletic training. Psychological and spiritual interventions and referral strategies specific to the role of an athletic trainer will be discussed for common problems such as: eating disorders, anxiety issues, substance abuse, catastrophic injuries, ergogenic aids, peer pressure, depression, and response to injury.

AT 555, Therapeutic Exercise, 3 Units

This course focuses on the theory and operation of various contemporary methods of therapeutic exercise in the rehabilitation of injuries to the physically active. The student is introduced to manual as well as mechanical testing and other primary components of comprehensive rehabilitation designs and implementation, including determining therapeutic goals, progress, and ability to return to participation. A laboratory component is included.

AT 557, Clinical Integration IV, 2 Units

This is the fourth of five clinical education courses. Each student will be assigned to a preceptor who directly supervises them as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they will be given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

AT 559, Applied Research II, 1 Unit

In this course, students meet with their research team and mentor to collect and synthesize data for their research project.

AT 562, Health Care Administration, 3 Units

This course addresses the organization and administration aspects of health care in a variety of athletic training settings including interscholastic, private clinics, and others. Students study topics such as medical record keeping (paper and electronic), facility design and maintenance, leadership strategies, insurance issues, public relations, and legal and ethical issues related to health care.

AT 564, Seminar in Athletic Training, 1 Unit

This course provides an integration of prior coursework and expertise in athletic training preparation for the BOC Certification Exam, and a forum for discussion of current athletic training issues.

AT 568, Clinical Integration V, 2 Units

This is the fifth of five clinical education courses. Each student will be assigned to a preceptor who directly supervises them as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they will be given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

AT 569, Research Capstone, 3 Units

Students will work with their research team and mentor to complete their research project. The project will be presented in print and poster format following appropriate professional guidelines.

PE 509, Special Topics in Physical Education, 3 Units

Students study specific current topics, trends, technologies, or innovative programs in the field of physical education and sport. The course covers theoretical and practical aspects of issues related to new problems or new possibilities for improving and enhancing teaching and learning within the field of physical education and sport.

PE 551, Curriculum Theory and Design in Physical Education, 3 Units

This course offers a practical study of physical education and athletic programs in the K-12 and collegiate setting including the following: a) philosophy, principles, policies, and procedures, and; b) design, management, and implementation in relation to the State Frameworks and Standards. Special emphasis of the course is on the application of a variety of research and instructional strategies in designing a physical education/athletic curriculum at a chosen educational level.

PE 552, History and Philosophy of Physical Education, 3 Units

This course is designed to explore both the historical and philosophical roots of the discipline. Particular attention is given to the time frame of the Antebellum Period to the present day structure of the profession. Philosophy fashions physical education and sport, thus a strong emphasis of different philosophies and their impact on the discipline are examined.

PE 555, Sociological and Ethical Issues in Sport, 3 Units

This course pursues a study of the evolution of sports and its role in American culture. Course topics include sports as a social phenomenon in American culture and ethical issues within the sporting context, including moral reasoning, moral obligation, and fair play in sport. Class topics assist students in evaluating and reinforcing their personal morals, values, and principles as they relate to their professional field.

PE 556, Facility and Event Management, 3 Units

This course will present students with an overview of the design, operations and management of sports facilities and associated special events (both traditional and non-traditional). This course will also provide students with an understanding of managing sports facilities for the community, high school, collegiate, Olympic, and professional levels. Traditional events, non-traditional events, and extreme sports events will be viewed and analyzed.

PE 557A, Field Studies/Internships in Sport Management, 2 Units

This fieldwork course enables students to apply their knowledge, skills, and abilities in a practical setting. The sport industry is one that is a hands-on, applied industry. As such, one of the most crucial dimensions of any successful sport management degree program is its associated practical/experiential learning opportunities.The goal of the APU Sport Management internship course is to provide students with pre-professional, practical experience within a sport management setting. Students will learn under the direction and supervision of an approved sport management professional. Each units requires 33.3 clock hours of internship experience. This course requires students to complete 100 internship hours in a managed sport setting.

Prerequisites: Completion of all other MS in Physical Education/ sport management and integrated leadership coursework except for PE 584 and PE 589 which can be completed concurrently.

PE 557B, Field Studies/Internships in Sport Management, 1 Unit

This fieldwork course enables students to apply their knowledge, skills, and abilities in a practical setting. The sport industry is one that is a hands-on, applied industry. As such, one of the most crucial dimensions of any successful sport management degree program is its associated practical/experiential learning opportunities.The goal of the APU Sport Management internship course is to provide students with pre-professional, practical experience within a sport management setting. Students will learn under the direction and supervision of an approved sport management professional. Each units requires 33.3 clock hours of internship experience. This course requires students to complete 100 internship hours in a managed sport setting.

PE 558, Sport Finance, 3 Units

This course is a survey examination of principles of economics, budgeting, and finance as it applies to the sport industry.

PE 560, Sports Medicine, 3 Units

This course is designed for physical educators and coaches to examine sports injuries and accidents and become competent in prevention, assessment, treatment, and basic rehabilitation techniques.

PE 565, Athletics and the Law, 3 Units

This course includes current legal issues confronting the sport industry and enables coaches, athletic directors, fitness experts, and physical educators to develop risk-management strategies that will assist them in setting guidelines, policies, plans, and procedures.

PE 570, Leadership and Administration of Physical Education and Athletic Programs, 3 Units

This course includes a discussion of management theories, philosophy, program development, operations, budgeting, fundraising, personnel, and staff development for the administration of physical education and athletic programs. Students identify and analyze problems unique to the physical education and athletic professions and implement realistic, objective, and workable action plans.

PE 572, Foundations of Sport Management, 3 Units

This course is an overview of multiple areas relating to sport management. This includes: 1) careers and professional perspective; 2) history of sport management; 3) concepts of communication, leadership and management; 4) athletic governance in the K-12, Jr College/ College and University setting; 5) community, youth and professional sport management; and, 6) marketing and sport tourism.

PE 575, Advanced Principles of Physical Conditioning, 3 Units

This course is designed for physical educators, coaches, athletic trainers, and fitness experts to understand and apply the concepts of cardiovascular exercise, muscular strength, flexibility, nutrition, and body weight as it relates to physical education and athletics.

PE 578, Sport Psychology, 3 Units

This course allows the student to examine psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior. The student is introduced to a broad overview of the major topics in the area with opportunity for research, writing, application, and reflection.

PE 580, Wellness and Fitness for Life, 3 Units

This course is designed for the candidate to understand, practice, and teach the physical, emotional, intellectual, occupational, environmental, social, and spiritual components of health and wellness.

PE 582, Seminar in Professional Literature in Physical Education and Sport, 3 Units

This course pursues a study of literature in physical education and sport and includes various topics and current issues related to the changing profession. The student learns to access APU's online library to retrieve reputable sources in physical education and sport and to research and write using APA standards. The student also engages in critical thinking and reflection exercises with application to physical education and sport.

PE 584, Assessment, Technology, and Evaluation in Physical Education, 3 Units

This course gives physical education and exercise science practitioners theoretical and practical knowledge in assessment, technology, and evaluation techniques. Assessment tools are introduced and practiced, including basic statistical concepts, computer/technology applications, and validity/reliability theories. This course allows each student to master and apply the essential content, principles, and concepts necessary to become an effective evaluator in physical education and exercise science. Students complete chapters 1-3 in PE 584, and chapters 4-5 and capstone defense in PE 589. Graduate physical education students must maintain a cumulative GPA of B (3.0) or better, and may not earn lower than a C (2.0) in any PE core or content course. The student must earn a score of "credit" in PE 584 and a B (3.0) in PE 589. PE 584 is the

prerequisite course to PE 589 (Physical Education and Exercise Science Capstone).

PE 589, Physical Education and Exercise Science Capstone, 3 Units

This advanced course enables physical educators to become more informed consumers and designers of educational research with the planning and implementation of classroom or site-based inquiry. Through integrated research activities, educators, coaches, and exercise science professionals locate, value, select, and appropriately apply educational research. A variety of descriptive data, as well as qualitative and quantitative methods of data gathering, are analyzed resulting in an extensive research project.

PE 597, Structural Kinesiology, 3 Units

This course introduces students to structural kinesiology through an explanation of human movement and human anatomy. Fundamentals of body mechanics are coupled with kinesiological principles for the detection and correction of basic neuromusculoskeletal anomalies.

PE 598, Motor Learning, Development, and Control, 3 Units

This course includes discussion of the relationship between motor development and motor learning and provides a framework for establishing programs that facilitate skill acquisition for learners of all ages. It includes an examination of the development of movement skill in humans from infancy to older adulthood and how differing motor, cognitive, and social abilities affect the learning process of motor skills.

PE 599, Readings in Physical Education, 1-3 Units

This course is an independent study, arranged with a faculty member of the physical education staff.

PE 600, Physical Education Teaching Methods for Individuals with Mild-to-Moderate Disabilities, 3 Units

This course is designed to teach the techniques for the development and implementation of a physical education program for individuals with mild-to-moderate disabilities. Such disabilities include minor-to-moderate health impairments, intellectual disabilities, and emotional disturbances. Observation of one mild/moderate adapted physical education class is included.

Prerequisite: PE 452

PE 602, Physical Education Teaching Methods for Individuals with Severe-to-Profound Disabilities, 3 Units

This course is designed to teach the techniques for the development and implementation of a physical education program for individuals with severe-to-profound disabilities. Such disabilities include severe-to-profound health impairments, intellectual disabilities, and emotional disturbances. Observation of one severe/profound adapted physical education class is included.

Prerequisite: PE 452

PE 604, Motor Assessment for Students Living with Disabilities, 3 Units

This course is designed to teach the techniques for the evaluation and diagnosis of current motor ability levels for individuals with disabilities. Included are assessment methods and development and implementation of Individual Education Plans (IEP) in accordance with state physical education standards.

Prerequisites: PE 600, PE 602; Anatomy and Physiology

PE 605, Management of Adapted Physical Education Programs, 3 Units

This course prepares the adapted physical education specialist to manage the APE Program. This includes modifying traditional PE curricula, performing in-services with the use of technology, understanding service delivery models, understanding the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and collaborating with other direct service providers.

Prerequisite: PE 452

PE 606A, Field Experience in Adapted Physical Education, 1 Unit

This is the first fieldwork course for adapted physical education authorization candidates, and is for students who hold a current teaching credential. The course includes 35 hours of supervised practice in teaching individuals with disabilities in small to large groups in public or private agencies or schools.

Prerequisites: PE 600, PE 602, PE 604 and PE 605

PE 606B, Field Experience in Adapted Physical Education, 2 Units

This is the second field experience course for adapted physical education authorization candidates, and is for students who hold a current teaching credential. The course includes 35 hours of supervised practice in teaching individuals with disabilities in small to large groups in public or private agencies or schools.

Prerequisites: PE 600, PE 602, PE 604, and PE 605

Faculty

Department Chair

Sharon Lehman, Ed.D.

Athletic Training Program Director and Associate Professor

Christopher Schmidt, Ph.D., ATC

Physical Education Program Director and Associate Professor

Cindy Tanis, Ph.D., ATC

Clinical Education Coordinator and Assistant Professor

Christy Hancock, DAT, ATC, PES, CES

Professor

Cynthia McKnight, Ph.D., ATC

Associate Professors

Andy Alstot, Ph.D.

Jennifer Livingston, Ph.D., ATC

Assistant Professor

Greg Bellinder, M.S.