School of Nursing

APU’s Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (AGPCNP) Certificate program prepares registered nurses with master’s degrees in nursing to be nurse practitioners for adults in primary healthcare settings.

School of Nursing Mission Statement

To serve God through excellence in professional nursing education, scholarship, and practice.

Degrees, Certifications, and Credentials Offered

The School of Nursing offers traditional undergraduate and professional programs, as well as various pathways to the Master of Science in Nursing, post-master’s certificates, a Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing, and a Doctor of Nursing Practice.

Traditional BSN

RN to BSN

The RN to BSN degree completion program offers an alternative to the traditional method of pursuing a college nursing degree.

Upper-Division BSN Transfer Program

LVN to BSN and LVN to RN

Entry-Level Master of Science in Nursing (ELM)

For those who have completed a B.A. or B.S. in another field.

  1. Total prelicensure units is 70. Specific courses required.
  2. Postlicensure units to complete the MSN depend on the specialty chosen by the student.

Master of Public Health

Master of Science in Nursing with Specialties Programs

For those who have completed a bachelor’s degree in nursing.

  • Adult-Gerontology or Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS)
  • Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (AGNP) Specialty
  • Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Specialty
  • Pediatric Nurse Practitioner–Primary Care (PNP-PC) Specialty
  • Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Specialty

MSN with Credentials

  • School Nurse Services Credential (SNSC)
  • School Nurses Services Credential (SNSC) and Pediatric Nurse Practitioner-Primary Care (PNP) Specialty
  • School Nurses Services Credential (SNSC) and Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Specialty

MSN in Nursing Education

MSN in Healthcare Administration and Leadership

Post-Bachelor’s Credential

  • School Nurse Services Credential (SNSC) (a nondegree post-bachelor’s program)

Post-Master’s Nursing Certificates

  • Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist (AG-CNS)
  • Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (AGNP)
  • Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP)
  • Healthcare Administration and Leadership
  • Nursing Education
  • Oncology Nurse Practitioner
  • Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist (P-CNS)
  • Pediatric Nurse Practitioner–Primary Care (PNP-PC)
  • Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP)

Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing

The PhD in Nursing, with emphasis in either health of the family and the community or international health, is a research-based program designed to prepare graduates for a life of scholarship and teaching. The coursework for the PhD in Nursing consists of 46 units beyond the master’s degree, with an additional 9 units for dissertation research.

Doctor of Nursing Practice

Based on a strong scientific foundation, evidence-based practice, leadership, and organizational analysis, the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program is designed to prepare nurses at the highest level of practice for the current, complex healthcare environment. An evidence-based clinical approach emphasizes the prevention, assessment, and treatment of complex health issues. The coursework for the Doctor of Nursing Practice consists of 39 units including residency beyond the Master of Science in Nursing. This program is also available online.

Graduate Status

In the School of Nursing, graduate full-time status is considered to be 6 units per semester or 12 units per 12-month academic year. A student has a maximum of eight years to complete a graduate program, beginning from the date of initial enrollment in the specific degree program.

Accreditation

Learn more about the School of Nursing.

UNRS 105, Foundations in Professional Nursing/Aging, 6 Units

Lecture 3 units; Clinical practicum 3 units (135 hours/semester) This course focuses on the nursing process and introductory concepts crucial to professional nursing care, including interviewing, wellness, health promotion, and illness prevention. The clinical practicum includes application of concepts and acquisition of nursing knowledge and skills needed to provide healthcare to the healthy aging and hospitalized adult and aging client utilizing the nursing process to plan care based on human needs, problems of immobility, and pain.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nursing Program.

Corequisite: UNRS 105P (Practicum)

UNRS 105P, Foundations in Professional Nursing - Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 105 Clinical Practicum

Corequisite UNRS 105; Acceptance into the nursing program

UNRS 106, Foundations of Professional Nursing/Aging, 6 Units

This course focuses on the nursing process and introductory concepts crucial to professional nursing care, including interviewing, wellness, health promotion, and illness prevention. The clinical practicum includes application of concepts and acquisition of nursing knowledge and skills needed to provide health care to the healthy aging and hospitalized adults and aging, utilizing the nursing process to plan care based on human needs, problems of immobility, and pain.

Corequisite: UNRS 106P

UNRS 106P, Foundations of Professional Nursing/Aging Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 106 Clinical Practicum

Corequisite: UNRS 106

UNRS 113, Pharmacology, 2 Units

Lecture, 2 units This course is designed for students who have completed organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and biochemistry. The content focuses on principles of pharmacology and specifics of the major drug classifications.

UNRS 120, Fundamentals of Human Nutrition, 3 Units

Lecture: 3 units Principles of human nutrition are the focus of this course, including nutrient functions, metabolism, and changing needs across the lifespan. Nutrient deficiency and toxicity signs and symptoms are covered. Implications of a poor diet on the development of chronic disease are explored. Various nutrient analysis methods are used.

UNRS 212, Nursing Care of Adults/Aging, 6 Units

Lecture 3 units; Clinical practicum 3 units (135 hours/semester) This course involves application of biological, psychosocial, and spiritual concepts to adult and aging clients experiencing the stress of an acute or chronic alteration in physical health within the medical surgical setting. The nursing process is utilized to provide care to one or two clients within the health care delivery system of an acute hospital, skilled nursing facility, or transitional care unit, and extending to the community.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nursing Program;

Corequisite: UNRS 212P

UNRS 212P, Nursing Care Of Adults/Aging Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 212 Clinical Practicum

Corequisite: UNRS 212

UNRS 220, Health Assessment, 3 Units

Lecture, 2 units; Laboratory, 1 unit (45 hours): This course provides the nursing student with skills in physical, spiritual, and psychosocial assessment of adult clients. History-taking and physical-examination techniques presented in the course help the student develop strong assessment skills upon which further knowledge and practice can be built. Basic concepts related to assessment of geriatric, pediatric, and childbearing patients are included. RNs take this course in the summer.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: Must be accepted into the Nursing Program.

UNRS 240, Medical Spanish, 2 Units

This medical Spanish class is designed especially for nursing. Practical Spanish communication in real-life medical situations for beginners is emphasized. Pronunciation, intonation, and structure of Spanish within a framework designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills will be taught. Special cultural presentations supplement language study.

UNRS 260, Nutrition, 2 Units

Lecture 2 units; Foundations of nutrition in the prevention of chronic disease are explored. Pathophysiology of various disease states and appropriate medical nutrition therapy are understood. Nursing's role in nutrition assessment is appreciated with respect to patient weight change, intake adequacy, gastrointestinal symptoms affecting nutrient absorption, and activities of daily living. Students perform dietary recalls, nutrient analyses, and anthropometric assessments. Evidence-based nutrition care for gastrointestinal diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, energy balance and weight control, bone disease, and renal disease are addressed. Coverage of alternate feeding methods and issues surrounding drug-nutrient interactions are included. To expand their knowledge in these areas, students complete case studies. Opportunities to present prevention of disease through nutrition education in the community are offered.

Prerequisite: CHEM 123 or PRCH 123 or department approval if a non-nursing major

UNRS 270, Professional Concepts in Nursing, 3 Units

Theory, 3 hours/Week: This "bridge" course is designed for transfer students who are not required to take UNRS 105 (LVNs and RNs and students with nursing transfer credits who are entering the baccalaureate nursing program). It provides an introduction to the theories and concepts of professional nursing. The nursing process is presented and utilized as the basis for planning care as applied to patients. The content also includes discussion of current issues and trends in nursing and compilation of a professional portfolio.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program

UNRS 271, Theories and Concepts in Professional Nursing, 2 Units

This course provides an introduction to the theories and concepts of professional nursing. The nursing process is presented and utilized as the basis for planning care as applied to patients. The content also includes discussion of current issues and trends in nursing and compilation of a professional portfolio.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program

UNRS 280, Life Cycle Nutrition, 3 Units

Lecture 3 units: This course examines nutrient needs of individuals throughout various life stages: preconception, pregnancy, lactation, infancy, preschool years, middle childhood, pre-adolescence, adolescence, adulthood and late adulthood. Students understand the changing nutrient requirements through the lifecycle and apply this knowledge through special topic presentations and in the development of teaching tools that can be used for public education audiences. This is a service-learning course.

Prerequisite: BIOL 101, CHEM 123, UNRS 120, PSYC 290

UNRS 281, Introduction to Global Healthcare, 1 Unit

A seminar or online format is utilized to introduce students to major aspects of the global healthcare experience such as the development of an understanding of the expectations and responsibilities related to international travel, an appreciation of other cultures, and the integration into another culture, the in-country experience, and the re-entry into the home country upon return.

Prerequisite: UNRS 282 (may be taken concurrently)

UNRS 282, Transcultural Health Care: Country Specific, 3 Units

Lecture 1 unit; Clinical practicum 2 units (90 hours/semester): Through seminar, journal writing and a variety of clinical experiences, students are introduced to the theoretical basis of transcultural nursing practices and provided with an opportunity to formulate personal perspectives and individual cultural values that promote high quality professional nursing worldwide.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: UNRS 105, UNRS 113, UNRS 220; UNRS 281 (May be taken concurrently)

UNRS 282P, Transcultural Health Care: Country Specific- Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 282 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisite: UNRS 105, UNRS 113, UNRS 220; Corequisite UNRS 282

UNRS 105, UNRS 113, UNRS 220; Corequisite UNRS 282

UNRS 299, Statistics and Data Management for Nursing and Health Care, 3 Units

This course covers basic statistical concepts and methods of collecting, summarizing, presenting, and interpreting data for professional nurses and students pursuing healthcare professions. Among the topics covered are graphing, measures of central tendency and variability, the normal curve, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, and topics in probability that can be applied in real-world situations. Meets the General Education Requirement: Quantitative Literacy (Math). 

Prerequisite: MATH 95 or an appropriate score on the APU mathematics proficiency exam or SAT Math score of 540 or ACT Math score of 23. Admission to the School of Nursing, or Pre-Admitted Nursing status and admission to the Honors College.

UNRS 300, Complementary and Alternative Therapies: Herbs, Supplements, and Nutrition, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to therapies currently used as complements to Western medicine. Emphasis is on naturopathic medicine and biologically based therapies such as foods, special diets, herbal remedies, and dietary supplements. The course reviews potential risks and interactions between conventional and complementary and alternative therapies. The course examines agencies devoted to informing and protecting consumers and health care practitioners.

Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 151, and CHEM 123. Instructor permission required if non-nursing major.

UNRS 306, Writing 2: Theoretical Frameworks in Nursing, 3 Units

Students in this course learn to utilize a variety of genres of scientific writing while exploring, integrating, and applying theoretical models of stress, development, and health care adaptation to nursing practice. Students examine writing samples from various methodological perspectives and practice a variety of writing styles and forms of argument considered persuasive in the sciences. They also develop basic proficiency in the use of APA style. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 2: Genre, Evidence, and Persuasion. 

Prerequisite: C- or better in PRWR 110; acceptance into the nursing program.

UNRS 310, Mental Health Nursing, 4 Units

Lecture 2 units, Clinical practicum 2 units (90 hours); This theoretical and clinical course focuses on the dynamics of psychosocial stress within the interpersonal and intrapersonal systems of patients with acute and chronic psychiatric disorders. Short-term evaluation and treatment experiences are offered utilizing milieu, individual, group, and family therapy.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: Co-requisite: UNRS 310P; Must be accepted into the Nursing Program.

UNRS 310P, Mental Health Nursing Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 310 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisite: Co-Requisite: UNRS 310

UNRS 312, Nursing Management of Adults, 3 Units

Lecture, 1 unit; Clinical practicum, 2 units (90 hours/semester): This course continues the application of biological, psychosocial, and spiritual concepts to adult and aging clients experiencing the stress of an acute or chronic alteration in physical health within the medical surgical setting. Emphasis is on the application of concepts of pathophysiology and pharmacology to the nursing management of acute and chronically ill patients in the medical-surgical setting.

Special Fee Applies

Corequisites: UNRS 312P, UNRS 313 and UNRS 313P; Must be accepted into the Nursing Program

UNRS 312P, Nursing Management of Adults Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 312 Clinical Practicum

Corequisites: UNRS 312, UNRS 313 and UNRS 313P

UNRS 313, Restorative Nursing, 4 Units

Lecture 2 units; Clinical practicum 2 units (90 hours/semester); This course focuses on the care of an adult or geriatric client with a chronic health problem. The mental health and spiritual concepts are emphasized. Students are assigned to a rehabilitation or restorative setting.

Special Fee Applies

Corequisites: UNRS 312, UNRS 312P and UNRS 313P; Must be accepted into the Nursing Program

UNRS 313P, Restorative Nursing Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 313 Clinical Practicum

Corequisites: UNRS 312, UNRS 312P and UNRS 313

UNRS 314, Nursing Management and Restorative Care of Adults, 6 Units

This course builds on prior knowledge of biological, psychosocial, and spiritual concepts to help adult and aging clients experiencing the stress of an acute or chronic alteration in physical health. Emphasis is on the application of concepts of pathophysiology and pharmacology to the nursing management of acute and chronically ill patients in medical-surgical and rehabilitative or restorative settings.

Corequisite: UNRS 314P

UNRS 314P, Nursing Management and Restorative Care of Adults Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 314 Clinical Practicum

Corequisite: UNRS 314

UNRS 320, Cultural Aspects of Food and Nutrition, 3 Units

This course examines the foodways of people around the world. Health benefits and practices of various cultures will be explored along with how industrialization of food influences nutrition content and pricing of foods. Effects of famine on life expectancy and how one's environment or living situation limits access to food are explored. A food lab is included in the course to allow students an opportunity to prepare, taste, and realize a country's particular etiquette practices when dining. Course requires field trips. This is a service-learning course.

Prerequisite: UNRS 120, SOC 358, GLBL 301, GLBL 310 or COMM 310

UNRS 367, Pathophysiology, 3 Units

Lecture, 3 hours: This course presents an introduction to human pathophysiology. Mechanisms causing alterations in cellular activity, maintenance of cellular tissue oxygenation, fluid and electrolyte balance, and neuroendocrine control of the body are included. Common pathophysiologic disorders are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program

UNRS 380, Transcultural Health Care Outreach, 2 Units

This course provides an opportunity for nursing and nonnursing students to explore and understand theoretically based transcultural health care practices. The content serves to stimulate discussion and identify personal perspectives and individual cultural values as well as methods and frameworks appropriate to the development of knowledge related to the health care of individuals, families, and communities.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program

UNRS 381, Transcultural Health Care Outreach - Practicum, 1 Unit

This course provides an opportunity for nursing and nonnursing students to participate in service and learning in another culture as part of a health care team. It is intended to promote the delivery of health care and health education to underserved populations.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program

UNRS 382, Community Health Nursing, 3 Units

This course focuses on the study of principles and practices involved in community health nursing, with emphasis on the role of the nurse in assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating care of clients in a variety of community-based settings. Collaboration with community-based organizations and services that provide health promotion, disease prevention, maintenance during chronic illness, and client education services to individuals, families, and aggregates is an essential component of this course. A review of legal mandates and regulations specific to community-based care, analysis of the healthcare needs within a community, and exploration of issues such as liberty, equality, terrorism, crisis, and disasters are included. Lecture, 1 unit (1 hour/week); clinical practicum, 2 units (90 hours/semester). Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

Special Fee Applies

Acceptance into the nursing program; corequisite: UNRS 382P.

UNRS 382P, Community Health Nursing Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 382 Clinical Practicum

Corequisite: UNRS 382

UNRS 383, International Health Nursing, 3-5 Units

This course focuses on clinical observation of and participation in international healthcare settings, using a cross-cultural educational experience to give students a global perspective of healthcare issues. Students develop intercultural competence as they engage with people from diverse cultures with compassion and respect, and foster a commitment to global service, scholarship, and boundary-crossing community. Lecture, 1 unit; clinical practicum, 2-4 units. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Special Fee Applies

Acceptance into the nursing program; corequisite: UNRS 383P.

UNRS 383P, International Health Nursing Practicum, 0 Units

Lecture 1 Unit - Clinical Practicum 2-4 units: This course focuses on clinical observation and participation in international health care settings. The purpose is to broaden the student's worldview through a cross-cultural educational experience and to provide a global perspective of healthcare issues. In addition, it will provide opportunities to develop intercultural competence and foster a commitment to global service, scholarship, and boundary-crossing community.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program

UNRS 384, Urban/Rural Health Nursing, 3-5 Units

This course focuses on clinical observation of and participation in urban/rural healthcare settings, using a cross-cultural educational experience to give students a broader perspective of healthcare issues. Students develop intercultural competence as they engage with people from diverse cultures with compassion and respect, and foster a commitment to service, scholarship, and boundary-crossing community in vulnerable urban/rural populations. Lecture, 1 unit; clinical practicum, 2-4 units. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nursing Program;

Corequisite: UNRS 384P (Practicum)

UNRS 384P, Urban Health Nursing Practicum, 0 Units

Lecture 1 Unit - Clinical Practicum 2-4 units: This course focuses on clinical observation and participation in urban health care settings. The purpose is to broaden the student's worldview through a cross-cultural educational experience and to provide a global perspective of healthcare issues. In addition, it will provide opportunities to develop intercultural competence and will foster a commitment to service, scholarship, and boundary-crossing community in vulnerable urban populations.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program

UNRS 402, Nursing Care in Maternal, Newborn, and Women's Health, 4 Units

Lecture, 2 units; Clinical practicum, 2 units (90 hours/semester): This course focuses on the theoretical and clinical concepts of the childbearing patient, her infant, and her family. The students study both normal and complicated obstetrics. Birth preparation, prenatal care, intrapartal, normal neonatal, and postpartum care with concurrent clinical experiences are introduced.

Special Fee Applies

Corequisite: UNRS 402P; Must be accepted into the Nursing Program

UNRS 402P, Nursing Care in Maternal, Newborn, and Women's Health Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 403, Leadership and Management in Professional Practice, 2 Units

Theory, 2 hours. This course emphasizes leadership and management theory in a number of applications and health care settings. It assists the upcoming graduate in adjusting to various organizations encountered by professional nurses serving in a variety of roles. Core concepts relevant to the health care settings are presented with an emphasis on critical thinking, character development and leadership competencies, quality outcomes, and safety goal achievement for optimal patient care.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nursing Program. Note: Per the progression schedule for the Traditional BSN program students, UNRS403 is taken in the same semester as UNRS404/404P and UNRS402/402P.

UNRS 404, Nursing Care of Children and Young Adults, 4 Units

Lecture, 2 units; Clinical practicum, 2 units (90 hours/semester): This theoretical and clinical course focuses on the care of children from birth through adolescence. The effects of acute and chronic illness on growth and development are studied in the acute and community health care setting. Education of the child and family on health promotion, disease prevention, and safety issues are addressed. Ethical issues are discussed regarding the relationship of the child and family, including issues such as child abuse, informed consent, and the impact of diverse cultural and spiritual beliefs on health care decisions in the family.

Special Fee Applies

Corequisites: UNRS 404P and UNRS 403 or UNRS 403H; Must be accepted into the Nursing Program.

UNRS 404P, Nursing Care of Children and Young Adults Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 411, Advanced Nursing Care of Adults and Aging, 5 Units

Lecture, 2 units; Clinical practicum, 3 units (135 hours/semester); This course involves the application of pathophysiological, psychosocial, and spiritual concepts to adult and geriatric clients experiencing the stress of illness in acute settings. The area of focus is caring for critically ill clients and their families with complex health needs in a critical-care setting. Legal and ethical issues related to acute care are included.

Special Fee Applies

Corequisite: UNRS 411P

UNRS 411P, Advanced Nursing Care of Adults & Aging - Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 412, Clinical Residency Nursing, 2 Units

This clinical residency is an experiential internship program comprising a collaborative partnership between the School of Nursing and selected community in-patient healthcare organizations. This intensive program helps student nurses, under the supervision of preceptors, transition to beginning professional nurses in acute-care settings. It also enhances the skills and practice knowledge of students in preparation for the RN examination. Clinical practicum, 90 hours/semester. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: UNRS 411 and UNRS 411P

UNRS 425, Nursing Research, 3 Units

Lecture, 3 units: This course introduces the steps in the research process. Emphasis is placed on the principles and methods of the research process, including how this process contributes to the development of nursing knowledge and the improvement of nursing practice. This historical evolution of nursing research is examined and current issues impacting nursing research are analyzed. Ethical considerations and rights of human subjects are explored. Students have the opportunity to evaluate selected nursing studies throughout the semester in small groups with faculty input and guidance.

Prerequisite: UNRS 299; Must be accepted into the Nursing Program

UNRS 436, Fundamentals of Case Management, 3 Units

Theory, 2 units; Practicum, 1 unit: This is an introductory course for senior-level students covering the principles of case management, roles and responsibilities of the case manager, case management tools, plans and methods, issues (including legal ones), and how case management improves patient and hospital outcomes. It is designed to give an overview of what case management is and how a nurse can utilize these tools and skills to advance clinical practices. It is an elective course.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nursing Program.

Corequisite: UNRS 436P (Practicum)

UNRS 436P, Fund of Case Mgmt Practicum, 0 Units

UNRS 444, Clinical Specialization Elective, 1-2 Units

This elective clinical is a clinical specialty experiential course designed as a collaborative partnership with selected community health care organizations. This is an intensive preceptored clinical experience planned to ease the role transition from student nurse to a beginning professional nurse in a specialized setting. In addition, it enhances the skill and practice knowledge of the student in preparation for the RN licensing examination.

Prerequisite: One of the following: UNRS 402 (for OB), UNRS 404 (for Peds), UNRS 310 (for Mental Health Nursing), UNRS 382 (for Community Health). If taken for two units instructor consent is required. Co-Requisite UNRS 411.

UNRS 445, Applied Pharmacology, 2 Units

This course enhances students' ability to apply knowledge acquired in the basic pharmacology course by helping them utilize critical thinking skills at a more advanced level. Emphasis is on the application of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacotherapeutics of major drug categories used to manage common patient disorders across the life span in clinical nursing practice.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program

UNRS 495, Special Topics in Nursing, 1-4 Units

In this course, a topic of current interest to students is examined in depth. Students analyze and evaluate topics/issues to reach and express a position, enhance personal development, and/or to develop a particular project. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program

UNRS 496, Writing 3: Ethics and Issues in Health Care, 4 Units

This course focuses on the integration of Christian faith, ethical concerns, and issues and trends in health care that nurses encounter in their work life. Students develop their abilities as independent thinkers in order to construct bodies of knowledge, and communicate what they are learning through reading, dialogue, debate, peer critique, presentations, and the development and refinement of written pieces. The capstone project for this course is a comprehensive research paper and formal presentation demonstrating scholarship and readiness to contribute to the nursing profession. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: Senior standing in the School of Nursing; UNRS 306

UNRS 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

UNRS 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

UNRS 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, or electronic media. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Upper-division writing intensive course or instructor consent; and junior or senior standing

GNRS 500, Conceptual Foundations of Professional Nursing, 3 Units

This course focuses on the introductory concepts crucial to the socialization of second career students to professional nursing. The history of nursing, the evolution of nursing in the U.S., the art and science of nursing, the legal and professional basis of nursing, the role of nursing in the health care delivery system, and current issues and trends in nursing education, practice and research are emphasized.

GNRS 501, Theoretical Thinking in Nursing, 2 Units

This course examines questions about the nature and construction of theory and how theoretical ideas are developed and used in nursing practice and research. Philosophical ideas underlying theory are examined, and selected theoretical models and theories are explored.

Prerequisite: Completion of undergraduate research course or instructor's consent; admission to ELM or MSN program.

GNRS 503, Cultural Competency in Health Care, 3 Units

This course focuses on transforming graduate nursing students, preparing them for nursing leadership in nursing practice, nursing research, education, and public health policy for the improvement of patient healthcare outcomes in our increasingly diverse society. Students move from cultural sensitivity and awareness to critical reflection and action, challenging their assumptions and broadening their perspectives. The Essentials of Master's Education in Nursing (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2011) serves as the foundation for the development of core cultural competencies.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the School of Nursing.

GNRS 504, Bioethics and Health Care Policy, 3 Units

This course will outline the role of the healthcare leader in ensuring human rights are upheld in healthcare systems. This course focuses on bioethical analysis, decision-making and moral policy analysis, and formulation.Through course discussion, group and individual assignments, and oral and written presentations, students will analyze and apply bioethical principles to decision- and policy- making processes in the workplace and at national levels. Healthcare ethics and policy will be considered from a Christian worldview.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

GNRS 505, Christian Formation for Holistic Care, 3 Units

Students engage in the process of discovering the foundational values of Azusa Pacific University that serve as guiding principles for the distinctive education they will receive. They are made aware of the Christian worldview and its implications for personal holistic development and care. With a focus on developing motivating character and integrated caregivers, the course brings heightened self-awareness, the impact of a Christian worldview on vocation, scriptural awareness especially emphasizing healing themes in the life of Christ, and the importance of spiritual growth on the journey toward formation.

GNRS 506, Spiritual Concept Analysis in Health Care, 3 Units

Scholarly research and analysis of selected concepts in the spiritual care of persons from the Judeo-Christian perspective provide a central focus to the course. Students also examine healthcare research/other healthcare literature for adequacy with respect to the concept they select. Various assignments facilitate greater student awareness of their own spiritual journey and knowledge of faith traditions other than their own. The course is conducted as a tutorial/seminar experience.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

GNRS 507, Scientific Writing, 3 Units

This course provides opportunities for students to learn how to introduce a topic or issue, articulate a thesis, support and develop a thesis and subordinate claims, work with secondary sources, and organize an argument.

GNRS 508A, Research and Theory in Advanced Practice Nursing, 4 Units

This course prepares nurses to use theory and research evidence in advanced clinical practice. The relationship between theory and research is examined, exploring questions about the nature, construction, and use of each. Selected theoretical models and theories are explored, and students learn how ideas are developed and used in nursing practice and research. Students deepen their understanding of the research process by engaging in a systematic search, critique, and summary of research studies with direct application to nursing practice. Experience in statistical analysis of research data is included.

Prerequisite: Computer literacy, undergraduate research course, undergraduate statistics course, and graduate standing

GNRS 508B, Research and Theory in Healthcare, 4 Units

This course prepares the healthcare administrator to apply theory and research evidence in healthcare environments. The relationship between theory and research is examined, exploring questions about the nature, construction, and use of each. Selected theories are explored, and students learn how ideas are developed and used in practice and research. Students learn the fundamentals of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research and deepen their understanding through systematic search, critique, and summary of research studies with application to healthcare. Students work in groups to develop a research plan addressing a healthcare-derived question. Experience in statistical analysis of research data is included.

Prerequisite: GNRS 613

GNRS 510, Family Theory in Health Care, 2 Units

The major theoretical perspectives for understanding the family as a core unit of analysis are studied. This course fosters the student's recognition of the family's responsibility for health. Factors such as family patterns and care-giving tasks of families experiencing catastrophic or chronic alteration in health care are examined. This class is offered online.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

GNRS 511, Advanced Pediatric Health Assessment and Health Promotion, 4 Units

This course develops the graduate nurse's assessment skills and focuses on the promotion of health in the pediatric population from the newborn period through adolescence. Emphasis is on adapting and expanding the medically focused history and physical assessment to incorporate the assessment of traditional health practices and identify culturally relevant and age-appropriate health promotion strategies. Outcomes are examined in light of related theoretical concepts. Strategies for health promotion include a focus on developmental and behavioral assessments, emotional health, nutrition, counseling to modify risk factors, and screening tests/prophylaxis for early detection and prevention of disease.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate health assessment and GNRS 515;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 512, Advanced Health Assessment and Health Promotion, 4 Units

This course develops the graduate nurse's assessment skills and focus on the promotion of health in individuals across the age range and within family, community, and cultural contexts. Emphasis is on adapting and expanding the medically focused history and physical assessment to incorporate the assessment of traditional and nontraditional therapies and identify culturally relevant and age-appropriate health promotion strategies for common episodic complaints and chronic health conditions. Outcomes are examined in light of theoretical concepts. Strategies for health promotion include a focus on lifestyle, mental health, nutrition, counseling to modify risk factors, and screening tests/prophylaxis for the early detection and prevention of disease.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate health assessment and GNRS 515;

Corequisite: Lab

GNRS 513, Advanced Nursing Practice Role, 2 Units

This course focuses on the concepts of role development and performance competence of the nurse in advanced clinical practice within the context of a reformed health care delivery system. Emphasis is placed on the clinician, educator, clinical program manager, consultant, researcher, and case manager roles of the advanced practice nurse. The leadership aspects of the roles of advanced practice are explored in relation to health care delivery, policy formulation, and legislation. The course explores theories and issues related to the advanced nursing practice role.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

GNRS 514, Research Proposal Writing, 2 Units

This course focuses on the application of the concepts in GNRS 508A. The goal is the completion of a research proposal that details the problem, the research purpose, questions or hypotheses to be tested, a critique of the literature, the design and methods of the study including protection of human subjects, the plans for analysis, use of the study, and the budget and personnel.

Prerequisite: GNRS 508A

GNRS 515, Advanced Pathophysiology, 3 Units

This course builds on basic anatomy and physiology and undergraduate study of pathophysiology. It focuses on development of an advanced understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of human health disorders. Diagnostic reasoning that facilitates the clustering of signs and symptoms leading to diagnosis is a key process undergirding the course. This course requires the integration of signs and symptoms, clinical testing (such as laboratory and radiologic studies), and pathophysiologic mechanisms with diagnoses.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and undergraduate pathophysiology

GNRS 516, Integrative Disease and Symptom Management, 3 Units

Using a systems-based approach, this course provides the student with a broad-based, graduate-level overview for understanding disease processes, treatment modalities, assessment and interventional strategies for patients across the life span.

GNRS 518, Supervised Practicum in Health Care, 3 Units

This course prepares students to integrate and apply theory, evidence-based practice, and national guidelines and standards in practicum settings. Students select practicum areas in which, with faculty approval, they will participate in experiences led by preceptors. The purpose of the course is to equip students with current, evidence-based knowledge in a selected practice area.

GNRS 520, Theory and Practice of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in Nursing Care of Adult-Gerontology Patients, 6 Units

Critical concepts in advanced collaborative management of adult-gerontology client populations by Clinical Nurse Specialists are studied. Differential diagnosis, pharmacologic management, cultural sensitivity, adult-gerontology continuum of health and illness (i.e., wellness, health promotion, disease prevention), teaching-learning theory, and evidence-based best practices for clinical decision-making for the Adult and Geriatric population are highlighted. CNS roles, competencies, and professional issues and integrated clinical rotations will be chosen from critical care or medical-surgical adult-gerontology populations. Clinical seminar times allow students to discuss and analyze current professional issues and clinical problems in a collegial atmosphere.

Prerequisite: Academic Core and Advanced Practice Core courses, current RN license, CPR certificate, and meets health screening requirements;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 521, Clinical Specialization in the Care of Adult-Gerontology Patients, 6 Units

The course prepares the student to apply concepts introduced in GNRS 520. It focuses on diagnosis and collaborative disease management of acute illness in the adult-gerontology patient by the Clinical Nurse Specialist. The integration of advanced skill development, theory and evidence based practice, disease management, clinical decision making, unit and organization management issues, professional issues and APRN role competencies are the foundation for this course. Practicum and seminars are planned to span the breadth of the students' clinical opportunities.

Prerequisite: Academic Core and Advanced Practice Core courses, GNRS 520, current RN license, CPR certificate, and meets health screening requirements;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 522, Disaster Nursing and Emergency Preparedness, 3 Units

This course explores the nature of disasters and prepares nurses to respond to various types of disasters - including natural, environmental, mass casualty, public health emergencies, terrorism, and bioterrorism - by utilizing essential knowledge, skills, values, meanings, and experience in the basic competencies of emergency preparedness and disaster nursing. In accordance with the position of major nursing organizations, emphasis is placed on evidence-based best practices for personal preparedness.

Prerequisite: Comparable course, such as UNRS 312 Nursing Management of Adults, a human growth and development course, a lifespan course OR an RN licensure.

GNRS 530, Theory and Practice of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in the Care of the Pediatric Patient, 6 Units

Critical concepts in the advanced collaborative management of pediatric client populations by the Clinical Nurse Specialists are studied. Differential diagnosis, pharmacologic management, cultural sensitivity, pediatric continuum of health and illness (i.e., wellness, health promotion/disease prevention), teaching-learning theory, and evidence-based/best practices for clinical decision-making for the Pediatric population are highlighted. CNS roles, competencies, and professional issues are integrated. Clinical rotations will be chosen from critical care or medical-surgical pediatric populations. Clinical seminar times allow students to discuss and analyze current professional issues and clinical problems in a collegial atmosphere.

Prerequisite: Academic Core and Advanced Practice Core courses, current RN license, CPR certificate, and meets health screening requirements;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 531, Clinical Specialization in the Care of the Pediatric Patient, 6 Units

The course prepares the student to apply concepts introduced in GNRS 530. It focuses on diagnosis and collaborative disease management of acute illness in the pediatric patient by the Clinical Nurse Specialist. The integration of advanced skill development, theory and evidence based practice disease management, clinical decision making, unit and organization management issues, professional issues and APRN role competencies are the foundation for this course. Practicum and seminars are planned to span the breadth of the students' clinical opportunities.

Prerequisite: Academic Core and Advanced Practice Core courses, GNRS 530, current RN license, CPR certificate, and meets health screening requirements;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 532, Advanced Nursing Practice in Pediatrics, 6 Units

This course emphasizes physiological and psychological bases for critical and chronic conditions in children, focusing on an advanced science base for the assessment, diagnosis, and management of children and families to promote wellness. Exploration of traditional versus alternate medicine treatment plans, as well as relevant cultural, spiritual, and health promotion strategies, is incorporated.

Prerequisite: Graduate status and GNRS 590A;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 533, Psychiatric Theories across the Life Span, 2 Units

This course presents neurobiologic, neuroendocrine, genomic, behavioral, and psychodynamic theories of psychiatric mental illnesses as they manifest among members of diverse cultural groups across the life span. A theoretical foundation for subsequent coursework in primary psychiatric mental health care is provided for the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Advanced Practice Core

GNRS 534, Integrated Psychiatric and Health Assessment across the Life Span, 2 Units

This course teaches the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner in interviewing, assessing, and utilization of other data collection methods to elicit, analyze, and evaluate bio-psychosocial information regarding psychiatric mental health illness as experienced and understood by the clients, across the lifespan. Assessment and integration of the effects of potential and/or existing co-morbid health problems are focused upon. Diagnostic reasoning that is based on the Diagnostic Statistical Manual is foundational in the course. Development of differential diagnoses and disease management, evidence-based practice, and health promotion that includes client and nurse practitioner collaboration is emphasized.

Prerequisite: Advanced Practice Core, GNRS 533 (May be taken concurrently)

GNRS 535, Psychiatric Interventions and Health Promotion across the Life Span, 6 Units

In this course students learn historical, theoretical, and contemporary evidence-based psychotherapies that promote and support client stabilization, rehabilitation, and recovery. The client as a collaborating decision making consumer and the client-clinician therapeutic alliance are central to this course. Students increase competence in assessment of psychiatric mental health illnesses, differential diagnoses and disease management, implementation of psychotherapy (individual, group, family), medication management, and health promotion interventions, including motivational interviewing. Student competence in developing and facilitating therapeutic groups as a recovery modality are included in the course. The role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner in the integration and coordination of support services that impact mental health and illness is also included. Students practice verbal psychotherapeutic skills that motivate and facilitate client self-management and progression toward recovery.

Prerequisite: Advanced Practice Core, GNRS 533 and GNRS 534; GNRS 539 may be taken concurrently;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 536, Psychiatric Mental Health Care with Adults and Older Adults, 6 Units

In this course students increase their knowledge and competence in the assessment of psychiatric mental health illnesses, differential diagnoses and disease management, implementation of psychotherapy (individual, family, group), evidence-based practice, medication management, health promotion and disease prevention interventions, integration and coordination of support services, with adults and older adults.

Prerequisite: GNRS 533, GNRS 534, GNRS 535, GNRS 539;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 537, Psychiatric Mental Health Care with Children and Adolescents, 6 Units

In this course, students increase competence in the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner in the assessment of psychiatric mental health illnesses, differential diagnosis and disease management, implementation of psychotherapy (individual, family, group), evidence-based practice, medication management, health promotion and disease prevention interventions, integration and coordination of support services with children, adolescents, and families.

Prerequisite: GNRS 533, GNRS 534, GNRS 535, GNRS 536, GNRS 539;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 538, Psychiatric Mental Health Care with Selected Populations, 5 Units

Students increase knowledge and competence in the assessment of psychiatric and mental health illnesses, differential diagnosis and disease management, implementation of psychotherapy (individual, family, group), medication management, health promotion and disease prevention interventions, and integration and coordination of support services with a selected population. Focus is on integrating and practicing all aspects of the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner with clients who are experiencing acute and/or chronic mental health problems and psychiatric disorders.

Prerequisite: GNRS 533, GNRS 534, GNRS 535, GNRS 536, GNRS 539;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 539, Psychopharmacology, 2 Units

Students in this course build upon knowledge of advanced practice nursing and provides content essential for the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner to prescribe appropriate pharmacologic treatment in practice. Mechanisms of action, interactions, side effects, and prescribing guidelines for psychopharmaceuticals commonly utilized across the lifespan are addressed.

Prerequisite: GNRS 533, GNRS 534; GNRS 535 (May be taken concurrently)

GNRS 542, Advanced Concepts and Competencies in Pediatric Primary Health Care, 3 Units

This course offers a comprehensive review and synthesis of core concepts and competencies for the pediatric advanced practice nurse in the primary care setting. This culminating experience for pediatric nurse practitioner students incorporates seminar discussions and clinical practicum placement, and also allows for a discussion of developmental/behavioral issues, management of acute and chronic care illnesses seen in primary care settings, and preventative health care.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, GNRS 532 (may be taken concurrently with instructor's permission), and GNRS 590A;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 543, Transitions Across the Care Continuum, 4-6 Units

This course focuses on principles and models of care and their implementation in a multidisciplinary practice environment that emphasizes healthcare delivery through integration of services and transition management. Students are introduced to decision making related to allocation of resources and services, development of protocols, and evaluation of management approaches. Evidence-based approaches to the clinical, administrative, educational, and research dimensions of patient care are emphasized. Evaluation of care management activities with the student's selected clinical population is an integral component of the course.

Prerequisite: NP students: completion of Advanced Practice Core; CNS students: completion of Advanced Practice Core and GNRS 520 or GNRS 530; HAL students: completion of MSN Core and GNRS 560.

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 544, Clinical Specialization Residency, 2-3 Units

The elective clinical residency is a clinical specialty experiential program designed as a collaborative partnership between the School of Nursing and selected community health care organizations. This residency is an intensive precepted clinical experience planned to ease the role transition from a student nurse to a beginning professional nurse in a specialized setting. In addition, it enhances the skill and practice knowledge of the student in preparation for the RN licensing examination. The student will increase their ability to perform clinical reasoning with the assigned patient population and evaluate QSEN competencies of patient centered care, safety, evidence based practice, informatics, and teamwork and collaboration.

Prerequisite: GNRS 573 (May be taken concurrently)

GNRS 546, Theory and Practice in Health Care Systems in the Community, 6 Units

This specialized course prepares RNs without a bachelor's degree for graduate study in nursing. A multiple theoretical focus that includes concepts from systems, stress, adaptation, developmental, and role theory is emphasized. A beginning practice in the utilization of the nursing process with an emphasis on nursing diagnosis and the nurse's role in assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating care of clients in a variety of community settings is provided. Collaboration with community-based organizations and services that provide health restoration, maintenance, illness prevention, and client education services to individuals and families at home are essential course components. A review of legal mandates for practice and discussion of ethical dilemmas and issues related to high quality nursing care are included. Specific content varies based on the students' prior education and experience. Clinical placements are arranged to meet the individual student's needs.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate research, pathophysiology, and health assessment;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 547, Nursing Leadership in Acute Care Settings, 6 Units

This is one of two clinical courses provided for the RN who seeks both a bachelor's and master's degree in nursing. The course synthesizes selected information from the generic bachelor's and master's programs for presentation in a condensed format, addressing the development and nature of today's health care systems and associated issues in the United States. Further, content familiarizes the student with several roles and responsibilities of the contemporary nurse, such as leader, consultant, teacher, manager, and client advocate. The course focuses on client needs in acute health care settings and emphasizes the relationship between the health care system and the advocate.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate research, pathophysiology, and health assessment;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 548, Health Promotion Across the Lifespan, 2 Units

The course focuses on health promotion and disease prevention across the lifespan and around the globe. The course includes exploration of population health issues, environmental implications in health and health policy, impact on health promotion and the development of disease.

Prerequisite: Academic Core and Advanced Practice Core courses, current RN license, CPR certificate, and meets health screening requirements

GNRS 550A, Theory and Practice in School Nursing, 6 Units

This combined didactic and clinical course provides theoretical content and field experiences that emphasize the multifaceted role of the school nurse. The student participates in field experiences and classroom learning activities that focus on the assessment and management of children's health care needs in various school settings. This course provides the student with the necessary tools and skills to successfully function as a professional school nurse. At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able to successfully function as a provider of health education as well as a provider, planner, and coordinator of health care in school settings.

Prerequisite: All School Nurse Services Credential courses except GNRS 590A, GNRS 589 may be taken concurrently

GNRS 555, Medical Surgical Care of the Adult and Geriatric Patient, 7 Units

This course introduces crucial concepts to professional nursing care such as nursing process, communication, therapeutic interventions, and critical thinking and clinical reasoning. The course focuses on the application of biological, psychosocial, and spiritual concepts to hospitalized adult and elderly clients with acute and/or chronic illnesses. Students will be guided in critical thinking and clinical reasoning exercises in the management of hospitalized clients. Nursing process is utilized to provide care to one or two adult clients within the health care delivery system of an acute care setting. The clinical practicum focuses on the cognitive basis, scientific principles, and manipulative component of psychomotor skills used when providing nursing care. Students will have an opportunity to practice simulated clinical skills.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program, completion of all prerequisite courses for the program;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 556, Intermediate Medical Surgical Care of the Adult, 7 Units

This course is designed to build on the base of medical-surgical nursing knowledge from GNRS555. The course focuses on comprehensive nursing care to patients with acute need for continuous cardiac monitoring, pulse oximetry monitoring, or ventilator assistance in telemetry units, in restorative care setting, or long-term care setting.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program; successful completion of GNRS 555;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 557, Medical Spanish for Advanced Practice Nurses, 3 Units

This course provides non-Spanish-speaking advanced-practice nursing students with foundational knowledge of Spanish language structure and vocabulary, helping them build appropriate phrasing to facilitate communication in healthcare settings. Cultural issues relevant to health and illness in the Latino community are also addressed.

Prerequisite: Graduate nursing student standing, or instructor's permission

GNRS 559, Audiometry for School Nurses, 3 Units

This course provides didactic instruction via eCollege and eight hours of on-site practicum experience that emphasizes the content and clinical expertise necessary to fulfill the requirements of the State of California School Hearing Conservation Program and training for the school audiometrist. The course focuses on the physiologic process of hearing and how to assess for deficits in hearing in children of all ages. At the conclusion of the course, and after having completed successfully all learning objectives, the student is eligible to submit an Application for Registration as a School Audiometrist in the State of California (a $10 registration fee is required with the application).

GNRS 560, Strategic Leadership in Healthcare, 3 Units

This course is designed to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes about leadership across the healthcare continuum. The student will consider the professional role of the healthcare administrator both from a leadership and a management perspective. Areas of concentration will include leadership theory, structure of healthcare institutions, systems thinking and decision-making, performance improvement including quality and safety issues, risk management and effective communication skills. Application of business skills will be integrated. Students will consider the theoretical and research background, current issues and trends, leadership and administrative implications of specific topics.

GNRS 564, Nutrition and Therapeutics, 2 Units

Students in this course explore the functions of nutrients and the consequences of nutrient deficiencies and excesses in the body. Course material introduces a variety of tools for planning and evaluating diets, including a computer diet analysis, and the application of nutrition concepts is interwoven into health care and fitness conditions. Students also study the prevention of chronic disease as it relates to proper nutrition and adequate exercise.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program

GNRS 567, Healthcare Administration and Leadership Supervised Practicum, 3 Units

This course provides the student with the opportunity to experience the role of healthcare administrator. An individualized administration practicum in a specific area of clinical emphasis is chosen by the student and approved and monitored by the faculty and preceptor. Competencies that govern the role of the healthcare administrator are explored in depth. Students focus on the context for enacting the role of administrator in a healthcare delivery system.

Prerequisite: All core and role courses

GNRS 568, Healthcare Finance, 4 Units

This course is an introduction to financial concepts and skills need for healthcare leaders, managers, and executives. The student will develop skills in assessing multiple dimensions of financial performance and methods to improve the financial health of an organization in the context of current patient care system.

GNRS 569, Quality and Safety for Health Care Practice, 3 Units

This course is designed to deepen and advance students' knowledge of, and ability to systematically apply the principles of, patient quality and safety in nursing practice. Based on national standards, the focus is on examining and applying quality and safety tools, including informatics, that can be used to improve patient care delivery across the continuum of health care.

GNRS 570, Parish Nursing/Health Ministries, 2 Units

This course provides an introduction to and overview of health ministry and parish nursing theory and practice. The philosophy of the course is that (a) the parish nursing role is that of a specialist in spiritual aspects of patient care in the congregational context, requiring the integration of graduate level theology/ministry and nursing theory and praxis; and (b) health ministry is an emerging role and trend in pastoral ministry that seeks to bring professional ministry skill to bear upon the integration of health, faith, and spirituality in the parish setting.

GNRS 571, International Health Care, 2-4 Units

This course provides students with experience in nursing care in other countries. Students prepare with coursework in the United States, then travel abroad, where they have experiences in acute and/or chronic care settings, exploring cultural, economic, systems, philosophical, and other aspects of care that influence the provision of health care in other countries. A debriefing period is provided upon return.

GNRS 573, Clinical Residency, 4 Units

The clinical residency is an internship clinical experiential program designed as a collaborative partnership between the School of Nursing and selected community in-patient health care organizations. This residency is an intensive preceptored clinical experience planned to ease the role transition from a student nurse to a beginning professional nurse in an acute-care setting. In addition, it enhances the skill and practice knowledge of the student in preparation for the RN licensing examination.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all pre-licensure clinical courses

GNRS 575, Nursing Care in Maternal, Newborn, and Women's Health, 4 Units

This course focuses on the theoretical and clinical concepts of the childbearing patient, her infant, and her family. The students study both normal and complicated obstetrics. Selected issues of women's health are explored. The student is introduced to birth preparation, prenatal care, normal neonatal, and postpartum care with concurrent clinical experiences.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program, successful completion of semesters one and two;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 576, Pharmacology, 2 Units

This course is designed for students who have completed organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and biochemistry. The content focuses on principles of pharmacology and specifics of the major drug classifications.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program

GNRS 578, Health Assessment, 3 Units

This course provides the nursing student with skills in physical, spiritual, and psychosocial assessment of adult clients. History-taking and physicalexamination techniques presented in the course help the student develop strong assessment skills upon which further knowledge and practice can be built. Basic concepts related to assessment of geriatric, pediatric, and childbearing patients are included.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 580, Gerontology, 2 Units

This course integrates research and writings about the major trends and developments in the field of gerontology as they apply to the field of nursing. The approach is interdisciplinary - course material includes information from the fields of sociology, psychology, anthropology, biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and psychiatry. Development in adulthood is viewed from multiple perspectives including cognitive, behavioral, biological, sociocultural, and spiritual, and the influences these perspectives have on the successful negotiation of age-related issues are considered. Finally, students examine aspects of human aging in contemporary American society and from a cross-cultural and ethnic perspective.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the School of Nursing.

GNRS 581, Primary Health Care of the Older Adult, 5 Units

GNRS 581 focuses on the role of the adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner in the management of the older adult including health promotion, assessment, treatment, and maintenance of common primary care health problems. The clinical practicum emphasizes the application of theory and evidence-based research for the delivery of culturally competent assessment and treatment of the older adult within the context of their families and in a variety of outpatient settings.

Prerequisite: Graduate status in the School of Nursing, completion of Advanced Practice Core courses;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 582A, Pathophysiology, 2 Units

This course presents an introduction to human pathophysiology. Mechanisms causing alterations in cellular activity, maintenance of cellular tissue oxygenation, fluid and electrolyte balance, and neuroendocrine control of the body are included. Common pathophysiologic disorders are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program

GNRS 582B, Pathophysiology, 2 Units

This course continues the presentation an introduction to human pathophysiology. Mechanisms causing alterations in cellular activity, maintenance of cellular tissue oxygenation, fluid and electrolyte balance, and neuroendocrine control of the body are included. Common pathophysiologic disorders are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program, successful completion of GNRS 582A

GNRS 583, Nursing Care of Children and Young Adults, 4 Units

This theoretical and clinical course focuses on the care of children from birth through adolescence. The effects of acute and chronic illness on growth and development are studied in the acute and community health care setting. Education of the child and family on health promotion, disease prevention, and safety issues are addressed. Ethical issues are discussed regarding the relationship to the child and family, including issues such as child abuse, informed consent, and the impact of diverse cultural and spiritual beliefs on health care decisions in the family.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program, successful completion of semesters one and two;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 584, Mental Health Nursing, 4 Units

This theoretical and clinical course focuses on the dynamics of psychosocial stress within the interpersonal and intrapersonal systems of clients with acute and chronic psychiatric disorders.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program, successful completion of semesters one and two;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 586, Leadership and Management in Professional Practice, 2 Units

This course emphasizes leadership and management theory including systems theory in a number of applications and settings. Its assists the upcoming graduate in adjusting to various organizations encountered by professional nurses serving in a variety of roles. Core concepts relevant to the clinical settings are presented using a systems approach. Emphasis on nursing case management is included.

GNRS 587, Community Health Nursing, 5 Units

This course has two areas of focus within the community setting: the study of principles and practices involved in community health nursing, and the development of skills for teaching a group of clients. The emphasis is on the role of the nurse in assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating care of clients in a variety of community-based settings, with a focus on care of the gerontological client. Collaboration with community-based organizations and services that provide health restoration, maintenance, illness prevention, and client education services to individuals, families, and aggregates are essential components of this course. A review of legal mandates and regulations, as well as discussion of ethical dilemmas and issues related to community-based care is included.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program, successful completion of semesters one, two, and three;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 588, Advanced Nursing Care of Adults - Leadership, 6 Units

This course involves the application of pathophysiological, psychosocial, and spiritual concepts to adult and geriatric clients experiencing the stress of illness in acute settings. The primary focus of the course is to care for critically ill clients and their families with complex health care needs in a critical-care setting. A second area of focus is on the utilization of leadership and management concepts/skills in providing comprehensive care to groups of clients and families. Emphasis is placed on preparing the student to practice in a beginning leadership role in managing client care. Legal and ethical issues related to acute care are included.

Prerequisite: Admission to the ELM program;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 589, Adolescent Health Care, 2-4 Units

This course focuses on the growth and development of adolescents, including assessment, prevention, and management of common health and psychosocial problems in this population. Emphasis is on age-appropriate and culturally competent provision of primary health care to adolescents in a family system.

Prerequisite: Graduate status in the School of Nursing; 2-unit version of this course requires prior completion of GNRS 515, while the 4-unit version requires prior completion of GNRS 515, GNRS 594, and GNRS 511 or GNRS 512.

GNRS 590A, Primary Health Care of the Young Family, 6 Units

This combined theory and clinical course focuses on management of health care of children (from birth through adolescence) and their families. Theory and clinical experiences emphasize assessment, prevention, and management of physiological, social, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, and educational needs of the child as an individual and as a family member. The effects of culture on development, parenting, and health care practices are emphasized. The course provides theory and clinical experiences in the management of normal and common pathological conditions to prepare students for advanced nursing practice in the role of nurse practitioner.

Prerequisite: Advanced Practice Core courses;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 590B, Clinical Practicum in Pediatrics, 4 Units

The student develops expanded skills in the comprehensive assessment and management of common childhood illnesses and problems and continues to gain skill in promoting child wellness. Application of theory and research is emphasized in the care of common illnesses throughout the childhood years.

Prerequisite: GNRS 511 or GNRS 512 and GNRS 590A

GNRS 590C, Primary Health Care of the Young Family for the School Nurse Services Credential, 6 Units

Using a system-based approach, this combined didactic and practical course focuses on assessment, nursing interventions, and follow-up for common illness presentations in children, as well as illness-related impact on social, emotional, and educational functioning. The effects of culture on child development, parenting, and healthcare practices is also emphasized.

Prerequisite: GNRS 512;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 591, Primary Health Care of the Childbearing Family, 4 Units

This course focuses on the assessment and management of the primary health care needs of the reproductive family. Emphasis is placed on health promotion and maintenance, disease prevention, curative, and restorative care. Cross-cultural aspects related to parents, male and female, of the childbearing family are addressed.

Prerequisite: Advanced Practice Core courses;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 592A, Primary Health Care of the Adult and Aging Family, 6 Units

This combined theory and clinical course focuses on the role of the nurse practitioner (NP) in caring for mature adults and aging family members, from young adulthood to elderly adulthood. Emphasis is placed on the management of common primary health problems of these age groups. The delivery of culturally competent primary health care interventions of young, middle-aged, and elderly adults is addressed.

Prerequisite: Advanced Practice Core courses;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 592B, Primary Health Care Clinical Practicum, 2 Units

This course provides the final comprehensive clinical management experience, allowing FNP and AGNP students to apply knowledge gained throughout their course of study. Clinical conferences provide opportunity for discussion of role development issues and clinical case studies. Students engage in the clinical assessment and management of adults of diverse cultural backgrounds with routine and complex health problems in out-patient settings. Under the supervision of qualified preceptors and School of Nursing faculty, the student must complete his/her clinical hours and demonstrate mastery to perform the role of an entry-level nurse practitioner.

Prerequisite: Completion of clinical courses for the FNP or AGNP program track

GNRS 593, Psychosocial Primary Health Care of the Adult and Aging Family, 4 Units

This combined didactic and clinical course focuses on psychosocial primary health care of the mature and aging family. Didactic content and clinical experiences emphasize the advanced practice nursing role in the medical management of chronic illness with concurrent assessment for psychosocial stressors that impact the experience and management of chronic illness. Students learn to tailor patient-centered therapeutic strategies, including presence, multi-faceted functional assessment, motivational interviewing, stress reduction techniques and spiritual support to individual patients.

Prerequisite: Advanced Practice Core courses;

Corequisite: Practicum

GNRS 594, Pharmacology in Advanced Practice Nursing, 3 Units

This course builds upon basic knowledge in pharmacology and provides content essential for the advanced practice nurse to render appropriate pharmacological treatment in practice. Mechanisms of action, interactions, side effects, and prescribing guidelines for drugs commonly utilized across the life cycle are addressed. Variations in pharmacological reactions attributed to cultural factors are emphasized. Strategies for fostering individual/family adherence to pharmacological regimens are examined. This course meets the requirements of the California Board of Registered Nursing in the application of a "furnishing number" by the advanced practice nurse in California.

Prerequisite: GNRS 515 (May be taken concurrently)

GNRS 595, Special Topics in Nursing, 1-6 Units

In this course, a topic of current interest to students is examined in depth. Students analyze and evaluate topics/issues to reach and express a position, enhance personal development and/or to develop a particular project. If students elect this course more than once during their program, each such course must address a different topic.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

GNRS 596, Foundations of Healthcare Informatics, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of basic concepts for practice in healthcare-oriented informatics. These core concepts include an introduction to clinical and translational informatics; foundational theory and practical application of clinical decision making and computerized decision support; healthcare systems and their organization; the special issues of administration, security, and operations of electronic records in the healthcare setting; human factors issues; information science in the healthcare domain; standards, terminologies, and the uniqueness of biomedical data; and a special focus on emerging technologies.

GNRS 597, Comprehensive Examination Directed Study, 1 Unit

This course guides the student through the process of demonstrating an integration of theoretical, clinical, and research knowledge. Critical thinking is enhanced through careful consideration of information presented during discussion. The examinations are taken as part of this seminar.

Prerequisite: Completion of all Academic Core and degree specialty courses. Final specialty course may be taken concurrently.

GNRS 598, Thesis, 1 Unit

A student initially enrolls in this option toward the latter part of the program for one unit of credit. The student registers for one unit of thesis credit each semester (two of three semesters per year) until the thesis is completed.

Prerequisite: GPA of 3.5 or above, chair's consent for thesis option, and completion of all Academic Core and Advanced Practice Core courses

GNRS 599, Readings/Independent Study in Nursing, 1-4 Units

A student may elect to pursue special interests for credit at any time during the program under the supervision of a faculty member. University policy states that the student must earn a grade in an independent study course in order to receive credit toward graduation.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

GNRS 613, Graduate Statistics, 3 Units

This course presents the knowledge of descriptive, correlational, and inferential statistics used in research that serves as the basis for evidence-based practice. Students develop the ability to perform descriptive and inferential data analysis techniques, use software applications to aid in statistical calculations and presentation, and interpret findings.

GNRS 620, Genome Science in Healthcare, 3 Units

This course covers basic genomic concepts and technologies intended for personalizing healthcare. The primary goal is to provide the student with clinically relevant knowledge that can be used in practice and for teaching other healthcare professionals, patients and families. Applications of genome science and technology are analyzed in the context of real world examples taken from a variety of clinical specialty areas to better understand the relation between genomics, health, and illness.

GNRS 622, Genome Science and Ethical Issues, 3 Units

This course examines current applications and implications of genome science and technology to healthcare, public health policy, economics, ethics, federal and state laws and societal issues. The following discussion topics are at the leading edge of healthcare and social debate: DNA biobanking, genetic profiling, and genomic technologies used in genome medicine such as stem cell research, gene therapy, and genetic enhancements. In addition, the course addresses ethics, philosophy, and theology literature to explore thoughtful discussions that cover a wide range of genome applications in healthcare and health science research.

Prerequisite: GNRS 620

GNRS 630A, Oncology Nurse Practitioner Fellowship A, 4 Units

This course is the first in a series of three fellowship courses that enhance students' critical thinking, diagnostic reasoning, and interpretation and management skills for advanced practice nursing in the field of oncology. Students gain a deeper understanding of the sciences necessary for enhanced role development, knowledge, and skills for advanced practice nursing scholarship, and practice in a designated appropriate setting under the direction of a faculty advisor in collaboration with selected clinical experts, with a focus on exploring the development and scientific underpinnings of components of expert clinical oncology practice.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the oncology nurse practitioner fellowship certificate program.

GNRS 630B, Oncology Nurse Practitioner Fellowship B, 4 Units

This course is the second in a series of three fellowship courses that enhance students' critical thinking, diagnostic reasoning, and interpretation and management skills for advanced practice nursing in the field of oncology. Students gain a deeper understanding of the sciences necessary for enhanced role development, knowledge, and skills for advanced practice nursing scholarship, and practice in a designated appropriate setting under the direction of a faculty advisor in collaboration with selected clinical experts, with a focus on exploring the development and scientific underpinnings of components of expert clinical oncology practice.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the oncology nurse practitioner fellowship certificate program.

GNRS 630C, Oncology Nurse Practitioner Fellowship C, 4 Units

This course is the third in a series of three fellowship courses that enhance students' critical thinking, diagnostic reasoning, and interpretation and management skills for advanced practice nursing in the field of oncology. Students gain a deeper understanding of the sciences necessary for enhanced role development, knowledge, and skills for advanced practice nursing scholarship, and practice in a designated appropriate setting under the direction of a faculty advisor in collaboration with selected clinical experts, with a focus on exploring the development and scientific underpinnings of components of expert clinical oncology practice.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the oncology nurse practitioner fellowship certificate program.

GNRS 631, ONP: Cancer Biology and Assessment, 2 Units

This course builds on knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of DNA, RNA, differentiated, and nondifferentiated human cells. Focus is on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of human cancer disorders. Diagnostic reasoning that facilitates the clustering of signs and symptoms is a key process undergirding the course. The course provides the foundation for the integration of diagnostic testing, physical assessment, and understanding of the predictable pathophysiology of cancer to stage tumors and predict metastatic risk in individuals.

Prerequisite: Admission to the oncology nurse practitioner fellowship certificate program.

GNRS 632, ONP: Cancer Therapeutics, 2 Units

This course builds on knowledge of the predicted behavior of human cancer. Technology in cancer treatment is evolving rapidly. This class will provide a pathophysiological foundation to understand cancer protocols. Current cancer protocols, classes and categories of therapeutics, technologies in development, and tumor resistance will be discussed. The cost-benefit, side effects, and availability of the covered therapeutics will be discussed.

Corequisite: GNRS 631

GNRS 633, ONP: Symptom and Side Effect Burden, 2 Units

Patients with advanced cancer often suffer significant symptomatic burden and the iatrogenic complications of treatment. This course develops a patient-centered approach to evidence-based management of common symptoms of cancer and side effects of treatment.

Prerequisite: GNRS 631 and GNRS 632

GNRS 634, ONP: Survivorship and the Psychosocial Impact of Cancer, 2 Units

Cancer patients and their caregivers face complicated psychological, financial, and spiritual changes, beginning at diagnosis and extending into the posttreatment phases. This course covers the common problems related to those changes, and best-practice strategies and techniques to help patients and families cope with cancer.

GNRS 635, ONP: Team-based Care and the Role of the Oncology Nurse Practitioner, 2 Units

The clinician role of the oncology nurse practitioner requires familiarity with the incidence, prevalence and risk assessment competencies for all common cancers. In addition, the oncology nurse practitioner must be prepared for a wide variety of leadership roles. Strategies for care coordination, designing and measuring interdisciplinary team outcomes, mentoring, collaborating with primary care providers, and rapid-cycle quality improvement are examined.

GNRS 636, ONP: Clinical Trials Nursing, 2 Units

The advanced practice oncology nurse practitioner must be prepared to be a direct care provider or study coordinator for clinical research trials. This course covers the knowledge and behaviors needed by nurse practitioners engaged in oncology clinical trials.

Prerequisite: GNRS 512, GNRS 515, and GNRS 613, or instructor consent

GNRS 660, Theories of Teaching and Instruction, 3 Units

This course analyzes selected teaching and learning models that are applicable to nursing education. Strategies for classroom and clinical teaching are examined. Research relative to nursing education is reviewed and critiqued. Design of research methods to determine effectiveness of teaching strategies is incorporated. Course development and student evaluation are emphasized. Selected faculty and nursing education issues are also explored.

GNRS 661, Leadership and Role Development in Nursing Education, 3 Units

This course includes an analysis of educational leadership and the multiple roles of the nurse educator related to teaching, scholarship, service, and practice. Theoretical perspectives and practical approaches supported by research in nursing and higher education literature, as well as the Christian educator's role promoting faith integration, are addressed.

GNRS 662, Assessment, Curriculum, Development, and Outcomes, 3 Units

This course addresses theoretical approaches to educational assessment, the development and implementation of nursing curriculum, and student and program outcomes. Emphasis is given to the importance of incorporating Christian values in the curriculum. The course also includes critical analyses of related topics based upon current research in nursing and higher education literature.

GNRS 663, Clinical Practicum in Nursing Education, 3 Units

This practicum course builds on clinical and teaching/learning theories, concepts in curriculum design, and instructional strategies. Under the supervision of a faculty-mentor, the practical classroom experience focuses on designing and implementing teaching plans for units of instruction, writing of teaching/learning objectives, selecting teaching strategies and learning activities, evaluating student learning outcomes, obtaining feedback on teaching performance from faculty-mentors, students, and self-evaluation, and reflection. The clinical teaching practical experience focuses on assessing and meeting nursing student clinical learning needs, conducting postcare conferences, clinical evaluation of nursing student performance, and student counseling.

Prerequisite: GNRS 660, GNRS 661, GNRS 662

GNRS 664, Teaching-Learning Strategies and Educational Technology in Nursing Education, 3 Units

This course will equip the nurse educator to develop and utilize theory- and evidence-based instructional strategies and tools in traditional and non-traditional formats in a variety of nursing educational settings.

GNRS 695, Special Topics, 1-4 Units

A subject of current interest is examined in depth. Students analyze and evaluate controversial issues to reach and express a reflective position. This course may be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 units applied toward the MSN or PhD degree; each course must address a different topic.

GNRS 700, Philosophy of Science, 3 Units

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and critical analytic skills to comparatively evaluate the philosophical foundations of scientific theories and the influence of Western philosophical schools of thought on the development of nursing science. Course content is organized to engage students in discussion and critical analysis of the epistemological and philosophic foundations of scientific theories and the characteristics of scientific knowledge according to the received view, paradigmatic view, perceived postmodern view, and feminist tradition. Special emphasis is given to the critical debate within nursing about the nature of nursing science.

GNRS 701, Nursing Knowledge Development, 3 Units

This course focuses on analyzing and critiquing the theoretical and methodological processes that are utilized in theory building and knowledge development in nursing. Discussion and critique of the different stages of theory development and students' experimentation with conceptualizing and developing their theoretical stance go hand in hand. Patterns of knowing, knowledge development, and criteria for evaluating nursing knowledge are examined in relation to the discipline's domain and the phenomena of concern in nursing.

GNRS 702, Nursing Theory, 3 Units

This course focuses on strategies for theory development such as concept analysis, conceptual mapping, and theoretical modeling as applied to the student's phenomenon of concern. It also provides critique and analysis of the major models and theories used in a variety of nursing settings in relation to existing interdisciplinary theoretical knowledge.

GNRS 703, Spirituality and Health, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to spirituality, including spiritual experience, as it relates to individual health and illness. Communal spirituality is also considered. Differentiation is made between and among generic religious and Christian spiritualities. While the course covers theoretical aspects of spirituality and their interaction with health and illness, concentration is on the movement from theory to praxis. This lecture/seminar course is oriented toward nursing educators who seek to develop a foundation in spirituality for spiritual integration as well as for its development in nursing practice.

Prerequisite: Admission to DNP or Ph.D. program

GNRS 704, Faith Integration and Nursing Scholarship, 3 Units

This course begins with an exploration of the nature, role, problems, and possibilities of faith integration in higher education and in the nursing curriculum at all levels of higher education. The special circumstances of faith integration and its implications for teaching in secular college settings are explored. This course further provides a critical explication of theological method and content in three domains: biblical hermeneutics, constructive theology, and ministry praxis for education. The focus of the course is on the appropriation of theological method and knowledge for the purposes of integration into nursing education and practice especially (but not exclusively) within the context of a Christian or church-affiliated college.

GNRS 705, Social Ethics and Health Policy, 3 Units

This course seeks to provide a social ethics frame of reference for health care. Medical and biological advances have contributed to a rapidly expanding amount of human control over human and natural processes, including genetic potential and behaviors. This new power raises questions of morality and highlights the need for discussion and legislation regarding the complex issues raised by developments in health care, medical technology, and science. A comprehensive social ethic places decisions about health care within the context of a fuller account of purpose and meaning in life.

Prerequisite: Admission to DNP or Ph.D. program

GNRS 706, Methods of Inquiry, 3 Units

Exploration of various methods of inquiry focuses on the difference between scientific thinking, wisdom, and alternative concepts of knowledge. Existential dilemmas intrinsic to the pursuit of truth, the exploration of the meaning of actions, the process of interpretation, the perception of reality, and empirical generalizations are discussed and their influence on the definition of research problems and designs explored. The nature of the problem and assumptions and their relationship within the physical and social order are addressed with an emphasis on understanding the complexity and interrelatedness of events and the concept of ecology in research. Research designs and methods are introduced as they relate to problem definition and theory and includes an overview of the principles of basic and applied experimental research, evaluation research, and the traditions and foundation of qualitative and historical research. The role of triangulation as a methodological choice in research design and analysis is addressed to provide a more insightful approach to the exploration of complex phenomena.

GNRS 707, Quantitative Nursing Research Design I, 3 Units

This course focuses on advanced multiple research designs and data collection approaches. Emphasis is on experimental and quasi-experimental designs, epidemiological methods, survey research, and evaluation and outcomes research, as well as on planning design and sampling. Inferential statistics and advanced statistical analysis methods including ANOVA and various types of multiple regression analysis are incorporated within the course content.

Prerequisite: Admission to DNP or Ph.D. program

GNRS 708, Qualitative Nursing Research Design I, 3 Units

This course focuses on analyzing the epistemological foundations and the assumptions of qualitative research methodologies. It provides an introduction to the major qualitative research methodologies including grounded theory, phenomenology, and ethnography. Each methodology is analyzed as to its appropriateness for the research question. Experience in carrying out a pilot study in the selected methodology is provided.

GNRS 709, Advanced Statistical Analysis II, 3 Units

This course presents advanced methods of quantitative inquiry. The emphasis is on the use of factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, path analysis, and structural equation modeling. Assumptions of the techniques are addressed. The course provides the student experience in using statistical packages for entering and analyzing data. Reporting results of the analyses is also incorporated. Making appropriate decisions regarding which of the advanced statistical techniques to use is stressed. Critique of the advanced statistical analyses of published health care research is also emphasized.

Prerequisite: GNRS 707

GNRS 710, Advanced Qualitative Research Methods, 3 Units

This course provides advanced knowledge and training in the use of qualitative research methods including phenomenological interpretation, grounded theory interpretation, ethnographic interpretation, focus groups interpretation, and feminist interpretation. Intensive interpretive and structured approaches to analysis and methods of establishing plausibility, credibility, and adequacy of qualitative data are emphasized.

Prerequisite: GNRS 708

GNRS 711, Advanced Research Methods in the Humanities, 3 Units

This seminar and consultation course introduces PhD students to nonscientific research methodologies as used in the arts, letters, humanities and aspects of the social sciences for the (a) conduct of original dissertation research on one of the disciplines of arts, letters, humanities, or nonscientific aspects of one of the social sciences, (b) conduct humanities-based research to widen and deepen a scientific dissertation topic, or (c) to enlarge the student's methodological repertoire, knowledge, and skill. The course is intended for those whose primary research education and experience has been in scientific methods and disciplines. (Enrollment limited to eight.)

Prerequisite: (a) successful completion of GNRS 701 and GNRS 706, (b) permission of the instructor

GNRS 712, Advanced Evaluation Research, 3 Units

Evaluation research bridges the gap between conceptual definitions, theory formulation, and practice. Evaluation research utilizes quantitative and qualitative research designs to analyze evidence and disseminate the findings to identified stakeholders that will inform decision making and policy development. Explicit models of the decision process for program development and implementation are incorporated into the structure of the evaluation design and analysis. The course includes needs assessment, benchmarking or best practices, logic modeling, program theory development, empowerment evaluation, system analysis, and process-outcome designs. Examples incorporate national and international programs.

GNRS 713, Advanced Statistical Analysis I, 3 Units

This course presents common nonparametric and parametric statistical techniques used in healthcare research. Assumptions of the techniques are addressed. Specifically, the course emphasizes t-tests, ANOVA, ANCOVA, RANCOVA, correlation, odds ratio, regression, and power analysis, and provides the student experience in using SPSS for entering and analyzing data. Reporting results of the analyses is also incorporated. Making appropriate decisions regarding which statistical techniques to use is stressed. Critique of statistical analyses of published healthcare research is also emphasized.

GNRS 715, Psychosocial Issues of Older Adults, 3 Units

This course focuses on the biological and psychosocial processes throughout adulthood and the older years. Theories of aging are examined, as well as social role changes, social stratification, and the development of institutions of the aged. The course explores both normal aging and psychopathology, and the systematic intrinsic psychological or personality changes associated with development and adaptation in later life. Other topics include clarification of the causes and prevention of health maladies in the later years, and the nature and treatment of the most common psychopathologies. The psychodynamics of institutionalization and family care of the very old are also examined.

GNRS 716, Translational Research, 3 Units

The goal of this course is to help the nurse scientist identify strategies within a multidisciplinary model that promotes the ready translation of research developed from basic laboratory, clinical, or population studies. The course involves three stages as set forth by the National Institute of Nursing Research. The first stage, referred to as early translation, reviews a promising discovery that was developed in the lab, epidemiologic study, or other study that involves the initial development and testing of an intervention. In the second stage, or late translation, analysis of the study design and intervention used in clinical trials determines appropriate clinical guidelines. In the final stage, where dissemination involves the broader distribution of the intervention, emphasis is on analyzing the strengths and limitations in the clinical setting.

GNRS 717, Health Technology and Informatics, 3 Units

This course presents an overview of the evolution of health care informatics from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students learn health care informatics history, concepts, theories, legal and ethical implications, and applications within the health care industry. This course introduces the student to the information system life cycle, human factor issues in health care informatics, critical issues affecting the development and implementation of information and communication systems and technologies (clinical, administrative, and learning), knowledge management principles, professional practice trends, and emerging ICT (information and communication technology) in health care.

GNRS 718, Organizational Leadership and Strategic Planning, 3 Units

In this course, students acquire knowledge and skill to effectively manage change, empower others, and influence political processes. Advanced nursing practice leadership occurs in clinical practice with clients and staff, within healthcare institutions and professional organizations, and in healthcare policy making arenas. To develop the leadership role, students implement strategies for creating organizational change to provide high-quality services at reasonable costs. Focus is on organizational process, including the associated management of conflict, change, and control of risk within a political context.

Prerequisite: Admission to DNP or Ph.D. program

GNRS 720, Wellness Promotion and Health Maintenance, 3 Units

This course focuses on the critical appraisal of theories and models of health promotion and on the evaluation of health initiatives developed for national health promotion and maintenance. Relevant risk prevention, control, and health promotion intervention strategies are emphasized. Communicable diseases; health hazards; high-risk health factors; acute and chronic illness across ethnicities, genders, and the life span; and morbidity and mortality of the nation's leading health problems are analyzed. Students' research questions are generated from a synthesis of knowledge regarding a specific phenomenon relevant to the student's individual area of study.

Prerequisite: Admission to DNP or Ph.D. program

GNRS 721, Health Disparities and Vulnerable Populations, 3 Units

This course offers an analysis and evaluation of various topics and issues on health disparities of underserved ethnic or minority vulnerable populations as well as an analysis of research that describes, explains, and examines variables influencing health disparities and intervention strategies to reduce these disparities.

GNRS 722, Research in Nursing and Health, 3 Units

This course is team taught and reflects the research expertise and program of study of the nursing doctoral faculty. It focuses on analysis of determinants of health and illness across demographic, biological, psychological, familial/cultural, and societal dimensions. Attention is given to theoretical explanations toward promoting development of students' programs of research.

GNRS 724, Quantitative Nursing Research Design II - Psychometrics, 3 Units

This course is designed to introduce students to the methods of survey research. The course considers practical considerations in the construction of questionnaires including determining questionnaire content, selection of item types and wording of items, selection of an administration method, piloting questionnaires, and locating existing questionnaires. Discussion about conducting survey research considers sample selection, analyzing information obtained from questionnaires using SPSS, evaluating questionnaires, sources of error and how to reduce measurement error in survey research.

Prerequisite: GNRS 707

GNRS 725, Research Practicum, 1 Unit

The practicum further develops, mentors, and socializes students into the roles and activities of research scientists and scholars. Emphasis is on mentoring to facilitate student progression in research methodology, culturally appropriate research strategies, data management, and data analysis. Students can chose either a quantitative or qualitative practicum experience.

GNRS 726, Advanced Scientific Writing, 3 Units

This course provides opportunities for students to learn how to research and introduce a topic in writing, articulate a thesis statement, support and develop a literature review, work with secondary sources, and organize a written paper that can be developed into a dissertation or translational research paper.

GNRS 727, Genome Science in Clinical Cases and Disease Management, 3 Units

This course focusing on medical family history taking, constructing and analyzing the pedigree, genetic counseling, clinical decision making and clinical case management for a wide variety of inherited and acquired diseases through the lens of emerging genome science. Clinical cases are discussed from a holistic perspective including: genome science, epidemiology, genomic profiling, genetic technologies, personalized medicine, interprofessional collaboration, ethical and legal issues, and health policy.

Prerequisite: GNRS 620

GNRS 728, Genome Science Research Methods, 3 Units

This course focuses on genome research methods for understanding and translating genome science to practice and to genome related nursing research. Understanding the research methods fosters a deeper understanding of the strength and the weaknesses of the science and an ability to critique the benefits and the limitations of the science for designing nursing research. The course includes a wide range of research methods that explore genetics or genomics in human populations. A key outcome of this course is to develop a research proposal using genome methods to design nursing research aimed at improving quality of health for individuals, families and populations.

Prerequisite: GNRS 620, GNRS 622, GNRS 727

GNRS 729, Population Health and Epidemiology, 3 Units

The concept of population health includes aggregate, community, environmental/occupational, and cultural/socioeconomic definitions of health. The implementation of clinical prevention and population health activities is central to achieving the national goal of improving health status and reducing health disparities among different aggregate groups. This course covers the basic elements and methodological concepts used in the epidemiologic study of factors related to health promotion and disease prevention in human populations. It brings together considerations from several fields of investigation, such as epigenetics, epidemiology, psychology, and public health, to study the effects on health and health-related outcomes.

Prerequisite: Admission to DNP or Ph.D. program

GNRS 730, Comparative Health Care Systems, 3 Units

This course focuses on exploring/analyzing environmental, social, cultural, political and economic determinants of health across the globe. Comparative analysis of international health care systems including governmental, nongovernmental, traditional, and faith-based organizations are emphasized. Epidemiological analysis of morbidity and mortality, analysis of health and illness responses, and health-seeking behavior across the age span and gender/ethnic variables are discussed with the intent to identify areas of research relevant to students' interest. Presented from a Christian perspective, this course investigates research and practice opportunities and responsibilities for advanced practice nurses in global arenas.

GNRS 732, DNP Clinical Residency, 0 Units

This course provides students enrolled in the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program with opportunities to develop professional nursing skills at the doctoral level. The focus of the course is to explore the development and scientific underpinnings of components of expert advanced clinical practice. Students select a population of interest for the DNP clinical residency and apply evidence-based practice and research findings in order to develop and improve practice. Over the course of the DNP program, students integrate previous nursing education and practice experiences with the DNP residency and concurrent doctoral coursework to meet the AACN Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice and complete a DNP scholarly project. The course may be repeated to enable the student to obtain a minimum of 1,000 residency hours. Previous hours from graduate clinical courses may apply, so residency hour requirements will vary.

Prerequisite: Admission to DNP program

GNRS 733A, Residency IA, 1 Unit

This is the first in a series of three residency courses designed to enhance students' critical thinking, diagnostic reasoning, interpretation, and management skills for advanced clinical practice. This course broadens and enhances understanding of the sciences necessary for enhanced role development, knowledge, and skills for advanced practice clinical nurse scholarship. Students practice in a designated appropriate setting under the direction of a faculty advisor in collaboration with selected clinical experts. The course focuses on exploring the development and scientific underpinnings of components of expert advanced clinical practice, and attention is given to the development of skills necessary to attain that goal. By the end of this course, students select their population of interest for their clinical residency and apply evidence-based findings to this population to identify potential areas of intervention.

Prerequisite: Admission to DNP program

GNRS 733B, Residency IB, 1 Unit

The second of a three-course sequence, this course may be taken concurrently with GNRS 733A and/or GNRS 733C with approval of the DNP director or designee. Grading: pass/fail

GNRS 733C, Residency IC, 1 Unit

The third of a three-course sequence, this course may be taken concurrently with GNRS 733A and GNRS 733B with approval of the DNP director or designee. Grading: pass/fail

GNRS 734A, Residency IIA, 1 Unit

The first of a three-course sequence, this course may be taken concurrently with GNRS 734B and GNRS 734C with approval of the DNP director or designee. Grading: pass/fail

GNRS 734B, Residency IIB, 1 Unit

The second of a three-course sequence, this course may be taken concurrently with GNRS 734A and/or GNRS 734C with approval of the DNP director or designee. Grading: pass/fail

GNRS 734C, Residency IIC, 1 Unit

This is the last of a three-course series of clinical residencies with a focus on transformative and collaborative leadership, including completion of the evidence-based practice project, assessment of project outcomes, and planned dissemination of findings. Students apply relevant clinical and research findings to develop and improve practice. Content emphasizes critical appraisal of skills and interventions necessary to ensure meaningful translation of scientific evidence into practice, including a cost-benefit analysis for implementing a change into clinical practice. The course also emphasizes the professional role of the nurse as a collaborator, leader, and provider of care with nursing colleagues and other members of the interprofessional healthcare team within the context of complex healthcare systems, preparing students to implement an advanced nursing practice role that results in practice and/or policy change at the local, state, and/or national levels.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of GNRS 733A, GNRS 733B, GNRS 733C, GNRS 734A and GNRS 734B

GNRS 735, DNP Scholarly Project Seminar, 3 Units

The DNP program requires a rigorous clinical project focused on translating scientific research to health care in a timely manner so that patients experience the best applications of science and practice. The project is a scholarly experience that implements the principles of evidence-based practice and translation under the guidance of a faculty mentor. In line with the AACN Essentials of 2007, the outcome of the DNP scholarly project is a tangible and deliverable academic product that is derived from the practice immersion experience and reviewed and evaluated by an academic committee. The project also serves as a foundation for future scholarly practice.

GNRS 736, DNP Scholarly Project Seminar: Evaluation and Dissemination, 2 Units

This course focuses on presentation to and approval of a completed DNP Scholarly Project. The DNP program requires a rigorous clinical project focused on translating scientific research to health care to improve the patients experience utilizing the best evidence of science and practice. This scholarly project is a culminating, independent experience which demonstrates the student's synthesis of coursework and lays the foundation for future scholarship.

GNRS 780, Doctoral Seminar I: Elements of a Proposal and IRB Application, 3 Units

This seminar directs the development of either a dissertation or a DNP Scholarly Project proposal draft that details a problem, the research/project purpose, questions or hypotheses to be examined, a synopsis of the relevant literature, the design and methods of the study including its timeline, protection of human subjects, plans for analysis, and the budget. The seminar also includes preparation of IRB applications, and peer review and critique of student proposals.

GNRS 781, Doctoral Seminar II: Developing a Grant Proposal, 3 Units

This doctoral seminar provides students with the opportunity to acquire knowledge, skills, and insights in the writing of a grant proposal. Discussion will focus on the value of writing grant proposals, the basic principles in writing a grant proposal, the components of a grant proposal, identification of funding sources, the difference between a research and a program grant proposal, as well as administrative factors in submitting a grant proposal. Students will craft and a grant proposal in response to a Request for Funding Proposal (RFP) that aligns with the guidelines of the funding agency, and additionally, a budget plan with justification, timelines, and a bio-sketch. In addition, students will conduct a peer review of class completed grant proposals.

GNRS 782, Doctoral Seminar III: Writing for Publication, 3 Units

This seminar focuses on various aspects of writing for publication and directs the development of a manuscript suitable for publication from a previously written paper (e.g., a course term paper). This course will help the student get started on writing; identify writing styles for various forms of publication including abstracts, journal articles, papers, and books; and determine appropriate journals to consider for article submission. The student will acquire practice in reviewing and critiquing scholarly writing by others. It will also address the editorial and publication process, as well as ethical aspects of writing for publication.

GNRS 783, Doctoral Seminar IV: Developing Professional Presentations, 3 Units

This seminar course identifies approaches to developing an effective and successful presentation, helping students find their voice and showcase their areas of expertise. Discussions focus on planning as essential to deciding on the content and the order in which the information is presented. Emphasis is on developing a logical sequence, one that flows naturally and is accompanied by audiovisuals that facilitate understanding of the material.

GNRS 784, Dissertation Seminar V, 2-4 Units

This fifth dissertation seminar provides the student a forum to explore with their peers research findings, theoretical and empirical implications, and potential venues for publication of manuscripts. Format and procedures for progression in the dissertation process are also discussed. Placement of the Course: This seminar is not required if dissertation seminar requirement of 12 units has been met by GNRS 780, GNRS 781, GNRS 782, GNRS 783, and student has defended dissertation. Grading: Pass/Fail.

Prerequisite: GNRS 783

GNRS 791, Doctor of Nursing Practice Intensive I, 1 Unit

This is the first of four intensive courses that give DNP students a face-to-face interactive experience through out-of-classroom work. This course introduces students to the role of the DNP nurse in a variety of healthcare settings. Students also acquire advanced practice and academic skills necessary for selecting a population of interest and applying evidence-based practice to it as part of an evidence-based DNP scholarly project consistent with the DNP role within a healthcare organizational setting.

Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP program;

Corequisite: GNRS 732

GNRS 792, Doctor of Nursing Practice Intensive II, 1 Unit

This is the second of four intensive courses that give DNP students a face-to-face interactive experience through out-of-classroom work. This course helps students identify strategies within a multidisciplinary model that promotes evidence-based practice in various clinical, community, and educational settings. Students receive support and direction in collaboration with the sponsoring facility and mentor as they develop a comprehensive, site-specific DNP scholarly project proposal.

Prerequisite: GNRS 791;

Corequisite: GNRS 732

GNRS 793, Doctor of Nursing Practice Intensive III, 1 Unit

This is the third of four intensive courses that give DNP students a face-to-face interactive experience through out-of-classroom work. This course helps students acquire the skills, competencies, and points of view needed for developing the ethical reasoning/decision-making skills necessary for conducting their DNP scholarly projects.

Prerequisite: GNRS 792;

Corequisite: GNRS 732

GNRS 794, Doctor of Nursing Practice Intensive IV, 1 Unit

This is the last of four intensive courses that give DNP students a face-to-face interactive experience through out-of-classroom work. As in the other intensive experiences, course content for each student reflects the interests of the student and is designed to meet that student's needs and career goals. This course allows students, with guidance from their mentors and faculty, to complete the DNP scholarly project and finalize the written and oral scholarly reports that disseminate and integrate new knowledge. Each student's final product reflects their ability to employ effective communication and collaboration skills, take a leadership role, integrate core DNP concepts and competencies that influence healthcare quality and safety, and successfully negotiate change in healthcare delivery for individuals, families, populations, or systems across a broad spectrum of health care.

Prerequisite: GNRS 793;

Corequisite: GNRS 732

GNRS 795, Special Topics, 1-4 Units

In this course, a subject of current interest is examined in depth. Students analyze and evaluate controversial issues to reach and express a reflective position. Students may repeat the course for credit to a maximum of six units applied toward the doctoral program; each course must address a different topic.

GNRS 798, Continuous Doctoral Study, 0 Units

This course is for doctoral students working on dissertations or translational research projects. Students must re-enroll each semester until the dissertation or translational research project is completed, defended, submitted to the library, and approved.

GNRS 799, Independent Study, 1-4 Units

Students enroll in this course to pursue independent study investigating subjects and interests that lie beyond regular course offerings. The student explores topics in greater depth than in other courses, and/or initiates an individual project. Readings are pursued in accordance with a study plan, which is developed in consultation with a sponsoring doctoral faculty member and approved by the doctoral department

GSPH 504, Bioethics and Health Care Policy, 3 Units

This course will outline the role of the healthcare leader in ensuring human rights are upheld in healthcare systems. This course focuses on bioethical analysis, decision-making and moral policy analysis, and formulation.Through course discussion, group and individual assignments, and oral and written presentations, students will analyze and apply bioethical principles to decision- and policy- making processes in the workplace and at national levels. Healthcare ethics and policy will be considered from a Christian worldview.

GSPH 506, Spiritual Concept Analysis in Health Care, 3 Units

This course focuses on scholarly research and analysis of selected concepts in the spiritual care of people from the Judeo-Christian perspective. Students also examine healthcare research/other healthcare literature for adequacy with respect to the concept they select. Various assignments facilitate greater student awareness of their own spiritual journeys and knowledge of faith traditions other than their own. The course is conducted as a tutorial/seminar experience.

GSPH 508C, Research and Theory in Health Care, 3 Units

This course prepares the healthcare practitioner to apply theory and research evidence in healthcare environments. The relationship between theory and research is examined as students consider questions about the nature, construction, and use of each. Selected theories are explored, and students learn how ideas are developed and used in practice and research. Students also learn the fundamentals of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research and deepen their understanding through systematic search, critique, and summary of research studies with application to health care. Students work in groups to develop a research plan addressing a healthcare-derived question. Experience in statistical analysis of research data is included.

Prerequisite: GSPH 613

GSPH 510, Social Determinants of Health, 3 Units

A central focus of the public health field is understanding the etiology, occurrence, and distribution of health outcomes (morbidity and mortality). One growing area of importance within the field is examining how health and disease are influenced and maintained by social, economic, and political risk factors - called social determinants of health. This course provides a macro-level overview of concepts, research and theoretical models of social determinants of health. Through interactive lectures, readings and assignments, students will be exposed to major areas of study linked to social determinants of health, with discussions centered on the following key questions: What social factors are the greatest challenge to health outcomes within local communities? What does it mean to use a social determinants lens when studying health outcomes among diverse multicultural populations? What are health disparities and how might they best be addressed? What behavioral lifestyle factors commonly interplay with social determinants of health?

GSPH 512, Health, Culture, and Diversity, 3 Units

This course covers the issues of health disparities in the United States and the development of culturally competent programs. Students examine what is meant by culture, the ways in which culture and health issues intersect, and how public health efforts can benefit by understanding and working with cultural processes.

GSPH 514, Research Proposal Writing, 2 Units

This course focuses on the application of the concepts in GSPH 508C Research and Theory in Health Care. The goal is the completion of a research proposal that details the problem, the research purpose, questions or hypotheses to be tested, a critique of the literature, the design and methods of the study including protection of human subjects, the plans for analysis, use of the study, and the budget and personnel.

Prerequisite: GSPH 508C

GSPH 518, Population Health Management, 3 Units

This course covers important topics in the effective management of public health departments and agencies. Students develop knowledge and skills to fulfill roles in public health management as leaders, administrators, fundraisers, and internal and external communicators. Course content includes ways to be an effective coach to maximize the team's performance, the essentials of effective partnerships, how to create and sustain public health initiatives using business skills, how to run meetings, ways to manage electronic correspondence, and effective strategies to keep the public health organization running smoothly.

GSPH 519, Global Health Systems, 3 Units

This course examines international health systems in terms of infrastructure and function. Students examine the benefits and risks of universal healthcare, third party reimbursement systems, and global availability and access to medical services.

GSPH 522, Cultural Inclusivity in Health Care, 3 Units

In this course, students explore the topics and tools necessary for the application of cultural inclusivity processes in various healthcare settings. Curriculum includes an overview of demographic changes in the United States, cultural inclusivity, diversity related to specific groups, and the paradigm of cultural and linguistic diversity. Attention is also given to the costs, time, and skill sets associated with the process of moving a healthcare organization toward cultural inclusivity.

GSPH 525, Epidemiology, 3 Units

This course covers the application of epidemiological procedures to the understanding of the occurrence and control of conditions such as infections and chronic diseases, mental disorders, community and environmental health hazards, unintentional injuries, and geriatric problems. Other topics include quantitative aspects of epidemiology, including data sources, measures of morbidity and mortality, evaluation of association and causality, study design, and screening for disease.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate statistics and biology

GSPH 526, Public Health Biology, 3 Units

Human health problems comprise a wide range of infectious, degenerative, neoplastic, and genetically based disease factors. In addition to these factors, human disease results from a wide range of environmental and socially caused pathologies. This course presents the basic scientific and biomedical concepts of modern public health problems and explores the mechanisms and models of the major categories of disease. An integrative approach using knowledge of nutrition, exercise, mind-body, and spiritual practices is explored. The biologic principles presented in this course are foundations to developing and implementing public health disease prevention, control, or management programs in the student's future.

GSPH 527, Advanced Biostatistics and Epidemiology, 3 Units

This course focuses on the application of statistical approaches in epidemiologic research, covering data management and selection of the appropriate statistical model. Regression analysis including linear regression, logistic regression, Poisson regression, and Cox regression is reviewed. Content also covers basic concepts in survival analysis including censoring, survival function, and hazard function. Epidemiologic methods for assessing causation, including mediation analysis, propensity score matching, and instrumental variable analysis, are also covered. Students learn to apply different analytic approaches using public databases.

GSPH 529, Bioinformatics [Proposed], 3 Units

This course explains how informatics relates to knowledge acquisition, knowledge processing, knowledge generation, knowledge dissemination, and feedback. Technology trends, information security, ethical and legislative aspects will also be highlighted. Students will apply these concepts to support practice, education, administration, and research and will utilize these principles to improve healthcare models.

GSPH 532, Infectious Disease Epidemiology, 3 Units

This course covers key epidemiologic methods for practicing infectious disease epidemiology including study design, interpretation of data, and assessment of validity. Course content covers methods in infectious disease epidemiology, airborne transmission, diarrheal diseases, blood and body fluids as reservoirs of infectious disease, vector-borne/zoonotic, and parasitic diseases. Students learn how to apply content and use problem-solving skills to develop effective prevention strategies.

GSPH 535, Environmental Health, 3 Units

This course examines essential issues in environmental health, including the scientific and historical foundations, regulatory and policy issues, models and tools for assessing community environmental health, and an overview of select issues and implications of the environment on national and global health. Topics explored include select environmental pollutants in the air, water, soil, and food sources; hazardous waste, risk assessment and communication; and issues of environmental justice and vulnerable populations, nationally and globally.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate biology, chemistry, or ecology

GSPH 537, Occupational Health and Safety, 3 Units

This course examines concepts and issues in occupational health and safety, identifying the significance to workers and public health. Students study social influences, historical events of worker injuries, industrial hygiene, and applicable principles of toxicology, worker quality of life, and safety in the workplace.

GSPH 540, Global Health, 3 Units

This course examines global health issues, emerging priorities, and worldwide challenges affecting population health and disease. Students address opportunities and challenges to international health, examine determinants of human health holistically, and plan, implement, and evaluate programs and potential solutions to promote international prevention interventions and optimal human health worldwide with a focus on global health equity.

GSPH 543, Public Health Communication, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of the use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community health decisions, with a focus on how communication concepts, theories, and methods are used for public health promotion and practice. Health communication theories include models of persuasive communications/mass media effects, social marketing, interpersonal communications, risk perceptions, and diffusion of innovations. Students work in pairs to develop/evaluate a health communication intervention that addresses a current public health issue within a specific target group.

GSPH 546, Principles and Practices of Toxicology, 3 Units

Students in this course examine the principles of toxicology, including dose-response relationships, toxicokinetics, mechanisms and methods of toxicity, select exposures to toxic substances and accompanying toxidromes, the use of antidotes, and relevance to public health.

GSPH 551, Theories of Health Behavior, 3 Units

This course helps students develop a knowledge foundation of health behavior theories and skills for developing theoretically based behavior-change programs. Given that a major focus of public health promotion, education, and prevention programs is on "changing health behavior," there is an ongoing quest to understand why people do what they do to (a) improve or maintain their health, and/or (b) worsen their health. Through lectures, readings, and assignments, students critically review and apply a range of health behavior theories that target the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and community levels.

GSPH 555, Infectious Diseases and Public Health, 3 Units

Students in this course examine the role of infectious diseases in regional, national, and global public health. Students study the historical context and surveillance of communicable diseases, as well as emerging issues in the field. Course content also includes the identification and management of infectious diseases, with students using case studies and proposing threats along with opportunities in prevention, education, and health promotion.

GSPH 560, Strategic Leadership in Healthcare, 3 Units

This course is designed to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes about leadership across the healthcare continuum. The student will consider the professional role of the healthcare administrator both from a leadership and a management perspective. Areas of concentration will include leadership theory, structure of healthcare institutions, systems thinking and decision-making, performance improvement including quality and safety issues, risk management and effective communication skills. Application of business skills will be integrated. Students will consider the theoretical and research background, current issues and trends, leadership and administrative implications of specific topics.

GSPH 561, Public Health Across the Disaster Cycle, 3 Units

Students in this course evaluate the roles of public health in natural and human-caused disasters, from "simple" to complex humanitarian events. Using case studies, students analyze the functions of public health agencies and practitioners in the context of institutional systems and the disaster cycle (prevention/preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation). Field trips outside of class hours may be required.

GSPH 566, Politics and Policies in Disaster Health and Emergency Preparedness, 3 Units

Students in this course evaluate existing governmental and institutional policies related to disaster health and emergency management (DHEM) within political systems. Implementation and evaluation of policy are analyzed and applied.

GSPH 568, Health Care Finance, 3 Units

This course is an introduction to financial concepts and skills needed for healthcare leaders, managers, and executives. Students develop skills in assessing multiple dimensions of financial performance and learn methods to improve the financial health of an organization in the context of the current patient care system.

GSPH 571, International Health Care, 2-4 Units

This course provides students with experience in nursing care in other countries. Students prepare with coursework in the United States, then travel abroad, where they have experiences in acute and/or chronic care settings, exploring cultural, economic, systems, philosophical, and other aspects of care that influence the provision of health care in other countries. A debriefing period is provided upon return.

GSPH 581, Disaster Health and Emergency Management Principles and Practices, 3 Units

Students in this course examine the practice of emergency management and the evolving field of disaster health. Content addresses traditional and current perspectives related to understanding disaster cycles and the relationship between disaster research and practice.

GSPH 593, Field Practicum, 3 Units

In this integrative learning experience, students complete hours in the field applying coursework and classroom learning in a real-world setting under the guidance and supervision of faculty and community-based preceptors, preparing them for professional careers in public health.

GSPH 594, Additional Field Practicum Experience, 1-5 Units

This field practicum elective gives students the opportunity to complete additional hours of practicum experience, allowing them to directly apply course content, public health knowledge, and skills acquired from the MPH program, under the guidance and supervision of faculty and community-based preceptors. This experience enriches classroom activity with practical understanding, and give students the chance to demonstrate an integration of coursework into a real-world setting, preparing them for a professional career in public health.

Prerequisite: GSPH 593

GSPH 595, Special Topics in Public Health, 1-6 Units

In this course, a topic of current interest to students is examined in depth. Students analyze and evaluate topics/issues to reach and express a position, enhance personal development and/or to develop a particular project. If students elect this course more than once during their program, each such course must address a different topic.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

GSPH 597, Capstone, 1 Unit

This guided-study course provides a summative experience for completion of the Master in Public Health program and guides the student through the process of demonstrating an integration of theoretical, clinical, and research knowledge from course work throughout the program to the solution of a major public health problem in this culminating project. Each graduate candidate will identify a unique health problem in an actual healthcare setting to address, perform a thorough review and synthesis of current literature, select an appropriate theoretical framework, and develop a creative and innovative solution to the problem. Candidates will meet regularly throughout the semester with course faculty to prepare for and discuss their progress and will submit their work for publication or comparable external review format at the end of the semester.

Prerequisite: Completion of all Academic Core and Specialty courses

GSPH 598, Thesis, 1 Unit

This course is the second part of a two-course sequence (after GSPH 514 Research Proposal Writing) that supports student development of a thesis in the Master of Public Health program. The thesis has served as an option to the master's capstone project.

Prerequisite: GSPH 514

GSPH 599, Readings in Public Health, 1-3 Units

A student may elect to pursue special interests for credit at any time during the program under the supervision of a faculty member. This course is an independent study, arranged with a faculty member of the Department of Public Health.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

GSPH 613, Graduate Statistics, 3 Units

This course presents the knowledge of descriptive, correlational, and inferential statistics used in research that serves as the basis for evidence-based practice. Students develop the ability to perform descriptive and inferential data analysis techniques, use software applications to aid in statistical calculations and presentation, and interpret findings.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate statistics and biology

Faculty

Dean

Aja Tulleners Lesh, PhD, RN

Senior Associate Dean

Renee Pozza, PhD, RN, CNS, FNP-BC, FAASLD, Senior Associate Dean of Academic Initiatives and Innovation

Associate Deans

Ruth Mielke, PhD, CNM, FACNM, WHNP-BC, Associate Dean

Grace Moorefield, PhD, APRN-BC, Associate Dean of Student Affairs

Sheryl Tyson, PhD, APRN, CNS, Associate Dean of Research; Executive Director, Institute of Health Research

Department Chairs

Marissa Brash, DrPH, EdD, MPH, CPH, Department of Public Health

Melinda Dicken, MSN, RN, CNS, Department of (Traditional) Undergraduate Baccalaureate Program

Aurelia Macabasco-O’Connell, PhD, MSN, ACNP-BC, FAHA, Department of Doctoral Studies

Sarah Obermeyer, PhD, CNM, WHNP, Department of Entry-​Level Master of Science in Nursing

Lynda Reed, DNP, RN, FNP-C, Department of Master of Science in Nursing Advanced Practice

Nicole Ringo, PhD, MSN/ED, RN, Department of Upper-Division BSN Transfer

Geoffrey Schroder, EdD, MSN, RNC, PHN, Department of Nursing Education

Linda Searle Leach, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, Department of Healthcare Administration and Leadership

Lori Silao, PhD, RN, MN NNP-BC, Department of RN to BSN

Professors

Lina Kurdahi Badr, PhD, PNP, RN, FAAN

Vicky Bowden, DNSc, RN

Pamela Cone, PhD, RN

Vivien Dee, PhD, RN, FAAN

Felicitas dela Cruz, DNSc, RN, FAANP

Teresa Dodd-Butera, PhD, RN/DABAT

John A. Doyle, PhD, MFCC

Nabil Hanna, MD

Aja Tulleners Lesh, PhD, RN

Aurelia Macabasco-O’Connell, PhD, MSN, ACNP-BC, FAHA

Ruth Mielke, PhD, CNM, FACNM, WHNP-BC

Constance Milton, PhD, RN

Grace Moorefield, PhD, APRN-BC

Renee Pozza, PhD, RN, CNS, FNP-BC, FAASLD

Lowell Renold, PhD

Sheryl Tyson, PhD, APRN, CNS

Leslie Van Dover, PhD, MScN, PN, RN, FNP-BC

Diana Lynn Woods, PhD, APRN-BC, FGSA, FAAN

Associate Professors

Najood Ghazi Azar-Chaaya, PhD, MSN, MSN-Ed, RN

Marissa Brash, DrPH, EdD, MPH, CPH

Linda Crawford, DNP, APRN, NP

Tina Escobedo, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC

Marie Fongwa, PhD, MPH, RN

Anna Hefner, PhD, RN, CPNP

Catherine Heinlein, EdD, RD, MS, CDE, RN

Angela Hudson, PhD, RN, PMHNP-BC

Sanggon Nam, PhD, MS

Sarah Obermeyer, PhD, CNM, WHNP

Patricia Quinn, PhD, FNP, ANP-BC

Lynda Reed, DNP, RN, FNP-C

Regina Rico, PhD, MSN, RN, PHN, FNP, Director of Experintial Learning

Diana Rodriguez, PhD, CNS, RN

Kathleen Ruccione, PhD, RN, MPH, CPON, FAAN

Nancy Sabin, DNP

Linda Searle Leach, PhD, RN, NEA-BC

Brent Wood, PhD

Assistant Professors

James Adams, MSN, RN, PMHCNS-BC

Rose Theresa Anderson, MSN, RN, PMHNP-BC

Christina Bivona-Tellez, DNP, MPH, NEA-B

Angela Coaston, MSN, RN, FNP, PHN

Kathryn Cortes, DNP, MSN-Ed, RN

Semise Daley, MSN, RN, FNP-BC

Nemesio Del Rosario, MN/Ed, RN, PHN, Monrovia Regional Site Skills Center Coordinator

Melinda Dicken, MSN, RN, CNS

Meaghan Ellis, PsyD, RN, MSN

Patricia Esslin, PhD, RN, APRN-CNS, CNE

Shirley Farr, PhD, RNC, CNS

Karen French, MSN, RN, FNP-C, PHN

Marcella Hardy-Peterson, DNP, WHNP, PHN

Katie McCoy-Hill, MSN, APRN, CCRN, CNS, ANP-BC

Lori Keith, DNP, WHCNP

Beverly Kelley, MSN, RN, CNS, CCRN

Laurie Lang, PhD, RN

Elizabeth Lopez, PhD, RN, FNP-C

Mario Macayaon, MSN/ED, RN, CHSE, Director of Simulation

Liberty Olive Macias, DNP, PMHNP-BC, DABFN

Renee Marquez, DNP, MSN, PMHNP-BC

Pam Milligan, DNP, RNC-NIC, FNP-BC, NNP-BC

Elsa Murdoch, DNP, MSN, CLNC, CPHRM

Sheryl Nespor, PhD, JD, MSN, BA

Jill Olausson, PhD, RN, CDE

Koy Parada, MPH

David Picella, PhD, FNP, CNS, GS-C

Marie Podboy, MA, CFRN

Amy Puzantian, MSN, RN, PHN

Orel Ramirez, DNP, MSN-ED, RN, PHN, CCRN

Nicole Ringo, PhD, MSN/ED, RN

Diane Sadoughi, MSN, RN, NP

Perry Sahagun, MSN, FNP, RN

Lawrence Santiago, EdD, RN-BC, CMSRN, CNE

Karen Schaid, MAEd, RN

Geoffrey Schroder, EdD, MSN, RNC, PHN

Lori Silao, PhD, RN, MN NNP-BC

Valerie Joy Smith, PhD, RN

Tammy Tade, MSN, RN

Angela Thurman, MSN, RN, FNP-BC

Janette Tingson, MSN, RN, CPN

Sharon Titus, PhD, MSN, RN

Jennifer L. Wenzel, PhD

Jie Yu, PhD, RN

Instructors

Margaret Brady, PhD, RN, CPNP-PC

Beth Colangelo, MSN/ED, RNC

Tara Devila, MSN-Ed, RN, PHN

Lydia Garcia-Usry, RN, MSN, PHN

Ragi George, MSN-Ed, RN

Dayna Holt, MSN, RN, CPN, CRNI, VA-BC

Taemin Jin, MSN, PHN, RN, CPEN

Victoria Lapre, MSN Ed., RN, CNE, PHN

Bridget Miranda, MSN, RN, FNP-C

Lisa Morrow, MSN-Ed, PHN, RNC

Jessica Oliver, MSN, RN

Brianna Pack, MBA

Christine Joy Phongdara, MSN, RN

Stephanie Radnoti, MSN, RN

Arianna Smith, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC

Karen Soikkeli, MSN, RN, FNP-C

Sarah Spencer, MSN, RN

Nursing Site Directors

Angela Coaston, MSN, RN, FNP, PHN, Inland Empire Regional Campus Nursing Site Director

Ana-Maria Gallo, PhD, CNS, RNC-OB, San Diego Regional Campus Nursing Site Director

Brent Wood, PhD, Monrovia Regional Site Nursing Site Director

Professors Emeriti

Barbara Artinian, PhD, RN

Constance Brehm, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, PHN

David Colachico, PhD

Phyllis Esslinger, MSN, RN

Elaine Goehner, PhD, RN

Patricia Hanes, PhD, MAED, RN

Bonita Huiskes, PhD, RN, FNP

Rose Liegler, PhD, RN

Jane Pfeiffer, PhD, RN

Karla Richmond, PhD, RN, CNS