Division of Teacher Education

With an intentional focus on scholarship, faith integration, diversity, and internationalization, APU provides high-quality academic programs within a tight-knit community of disciples and scholars.

The Division of Teacher Education prepares candidates to become public school teachers who demonstrate the content, pedagogical, and professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to help all K-12 students grow and learn. In keeping with a commitment to enhance teacher candidates’ understanding of the continuum of K-12 education, all programs emphasize a growing knowledge across the breadth of the program from theory to practice. Master’s degree programs with credentials embedded and credential-only programs provide the training and experience needed to qualify for California’s Multiple Subject and Single Subject Teaching Credentials, as well as Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe Education Specialist Credentials.

The Division of Teacher Education offers a B.A. in Liberal Studies with an optional integrated Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe Disabilities Education Specialist Credential, as well as a liberal studies minor. Additionally, the Integrated Bachelor’s/Credential Program offers several options in other fields of study, including allied health and mathematics.

The division also offers an online Master of Arts in Educational Technology, an advanced degree program available to credentialed educators seeking to become leaders in technology-embedded instruction; and two master’s degrees with a Multiple Subject or Single Subject Preliminary Teaching Credential embedded: the Master of Arts in Education: Learning and Technology and Master of Arts in Education: Teaching. The division also offers two master’s degrees with a Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe Disabilities Education Specialist Credential embedded: the Masters of Arts in Education: Learning and Technology and Master of Arts in Education: Special Education. Additionally, the School of Behavioral and Applied Sciences offers the Master of Arts in Physical Education and Single Subject Teaching Credential.

Learn more about the division below:

Mission Statement

The Division of Teacher Education produces teachers who are ethical, responsive, and informed practitioners who are faithful stewards of their time, talents, and resources. They model servanthood as a means to clarify and practice their faith and knowledge.

Professional Standards for Credential Candidates

APU credential candidates are highly desired because of the School of Education’s strong reputation for preparing highly qualified teachers who have been held to high professional standards. The Division of Teacher Education assesses candidates from admission through credential recommendation in credential standards and dispositions, including the following:

  • All credential candidates are expected to maintain a high level of professional and ethical behavior throughout the program. Failure to do so may result in expulsion from the program.
  • All credential standards and requirements for Multiple Subject and Single Subject Teaching Credentials, as well as the Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe Education Specialist Credentials, are subject to California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC), National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE, transitioning to the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation or CAEP), and federal policy changes, as well as graduate education policies. These standards, requirements, and policies supersede catalog descriptions of prior programs and requirements.
  • The division reserves the right to change the admission process and requirements as needed, withhold credential recommendation due to a candidate’s failure to meet and/or maintain APU professional and ethical behavior standards and dispositions, and/or expel a candidate at any time in the program due to a candidate’s failure to meet and/or maintain APU professional and ethical standards and dispositions.
  • Please refer to published general application requirements for credential programs.

Intern Credential Option and Eligibility Requirements

The Multiple Subject and Single Subject Credential programs, and the Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe Disabilities Education Specialist programs, offer an Intern Credential option specifically designed for the candidate who is teaching full time in an appropriate setting in a public K-12 school. Candidates planning to complete their clinical experience via an Intern Credential should communicate with a credential analyst in the Office of Credentials prior to beginning the eligibility process. To become eligible for an Intern Credential, a candidate must meet the following requirements:

  1. Hold a baccalaureate or higher degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education.
  2. Gain admittance to a School of Education preliminary teaching credential program and be a candidate in good standing.
  3. Successfully complete (grade of B- or higher in each course) at least 6 units of coursework in the School of Education preliminary teaching credential program. Candidates who already hold a California Multiple Subject, Single Subject, or Education Specialist Teaching Credential may check with the Office of Credentials for possible exemption from this requirement.
  4. Verify successful completion of the California Basic Skills Requirement via one of the options approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC).
  5. Verify successful completion of U.S. Constitution requirement (course or exam).
  6. Verify successful completion of subject-matter competence via one of the following options:
    • Multiple Subject and Single Subject Teaching Credential candidates: Pass CSET or provide evidence of having completed a CTC-approved subject-matter preparation program (subject-matter waiver).
    • Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe Disabilities Education Specialist Credential candidates: Individuals who hold a Professional Clear, Clear, or Life Teaching Credential that required a bachelor’s degree and completion of a program that included student teaching are exempt from this requirement. Others must pass the CSET for multiple subject, art, English, world languages, mathematics (including foundational-level mathematics), music, social science, or science (including foundational-level general science); or provide evidence of having completed a CTC-approved subject-matter preparation program (subject-matter waiver) for multiple subject, art, English, world languages, mathematics, music, social science, or science.
  7. Verify successful completion of the School of Education’s approved intern pre-service.
    • Multiple Subject Preservice: TESP 501 Art of Teaching I: Foundations of Teaching, TESP 502 Science of Teaching I: How Students Learn, TESP 511 Art of Teaching II: Pedagogy and Instructional Design, and TEP 521 Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (K-8)
    • Single Subject Preservice: TESP 501 Art of Teaching I: Foundations of Teaching, TESP 502 Science of Teaching I: How Students Learn, TESP 511 Art of Teaching II: Pedagogy and Instructional Design, and TEP 531 Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (7-12)
    • Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe Preservice: TESP 501 Art of Teaching I: Foundations of Teaching, TESP 502 Science of Teaching I: How Students Learn, TESP 511 Art of Teaching II: Pedagogy and Instructional Design, and SPED 525 Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing

    Candidates may also meet intern preservice requirements via completion of Alternative Certification Training (ACT) through the Kern County Superintendent of Schools. Candidates are required to work with their credential analyst for completion of preservice requirements through ACT or documented evidence of completing another CTC-approved preservice certification program.

  8. Verify successful completion of 30 hours of early fieldwork experience via one of the following options:
    • APU fieldwork that is embedded in courses.
    • Current California Multiple Subject, Single Subject, or Education Specialist Teaching Credential.
    • Life Ryan Credentials, out-of-state credentials, and previous teaching experience will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
  9. Demonstrate competence in reading instruction via completion of the School of Education Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing course relevant to the candidate’s preliminary credential program AND proof of registration for the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA) exam OR proof of a passing score on the RICA exam. Candidates who already hold a California Multiple Subject or Education Specialist Teaching Credential may check with the Office of Credentials for possible exemption from this requirement.
  10. Gain employment under a full-time public school contract at a school site located within 50 miles of Azusa or an APU regional campus offering School of Education preliminary teacher credential programs.
  11. Verify employment as evidenced by a letter from school or district administration on school or district letterhead fully describing the teaching assignment.
  12. Submit the credential application and Intern Credential Application Request through the Office of Credentials.

Completion of the above requirements does not guarantee recommendation for an Intern Credential; such recommendation is contingent upon the availability of university mentors. The School of Education must also have a valid Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in place with the employing Local Education Agency (LEA) extending the offer of employment. Additionally, the intern coordinator and program director for the relevant preliminary teacher credential program will review the candidate’s file to determine if the candidate demonstrates appropriate academic progress and dispositions for recommendation for an Intern Credential.

Note: The School of Education at Azusa Pacific University is not approved to offer the Bilingual Crosscultural Language and Academic Development Certificate (BCLAD). At this time, the intern programs are not designed to support individuals employed in bilingual classrooms. We are unable to recommend a candidate for an intern credential if their intern placement is in a bilingual classroom.

Once a candidate has been recommended for an Intern Credential, he/she must comply with the following requirements to maintain eligibility for the Intern Credential:

  • Be continuously employed in a teaching assignment that requires the Intern Credential
  • Be an APU School of Education candidate in good standing
  • Be making satisfactory progress toward program completion for the duration of the Intern Credential
  • Follow his/her signed advising plan
  • Enroll in an intern support course (SPED 500 or TEP 590) or clinical practice course each term he/she holds an Intern Credential

Note: Once a candidate has progressed to the start of the second 8 weeks of clinical practice, the candidate has passed the point where he/she can be recommended for an Intern Credential. Upon completion of 16 weeks of clinical practice, a candidate with an Intern Credential has one 8-week session in which to complete the preliminary credential requirements and application and move to the preliminary credential. This includes passing the RICA for those candidates working toward a preliminary credential requiring RICA. Failure to either maintain eligibility for the Intern Credential or to complete the preliminary credential requirements and application within the one 8-week session immediately following completion of clinical practice will result in withdrawal of the Intern Credential, which could impact the candidate’s employment.

Programs Offered

Department of Advanced Studies

  • Master of Arts in Educational Technology
  • Emphasis coursework for the:
    • Master of Arts in Education: Learning and Technology
    • Master of Arts in Education: Special Education
    • Master of Arts in Education: Teaching

Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

Department of Special Education

Integrated Bachelor’s/Credential Program

EDLS 200, Introduction to Teaching as a Profession K-12, 4 Units

This course provides an overview to the teaching profession, focusing on the art of teaching at the K-12 level. Issues addressed surround the Common Core standards, the California State Standards for the Teaching Profession, and the California Content Standards, including school organization, curriculum and pedagogical practices, classroom management, and assessment. The service-learning lab requires 45 hours in a K-12 school. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

EDLS 202, Introduction to Teaching as a Profession (7-12), 4 Units

This course provides an overview to the teaching profession, focusing on the art of teaching at the 7-12 level. Issues addressed surround the Common Core standards, the California State Standards for the Teaching Profession, and the California Content Standards, including school organization, curriculum and pedagogical practices, classroom management, and assessment. The service-learning lab requires 45 hours in a 7-12 school. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

EDLS 300, Introduction to Teaching as a Profession, 4 Units

Lecture, 3 hours; Lab, 1 hour and 15 minutes per week: This course provides an overview to the teaching profession, focusing on the art of teaching at the K-12 level. Issues addressed surround the California State Standards for the Teaching Profession and Content Standards including school organization, curriculum and pedagogical practices, classroom management, and assessment. The service-learning lab requires 15 hours in a K-12 school.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

EDLS 302, Introduction to Teaching as a Profession: 7-12, 4 Units

Lecture, 3 hours; Lab, 1 hour 15 minutes per week: The course provides an overview to the art and profession of teaching at the 7-12 level. Issues addressed surround the California State Standards for Content and the Teaching Profession, including school organization, curriculum and pedagogical practices, classroom management, and assessment. The service-learning lab requires 15 hours in 7-12 classrooms.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

EDLS 303, Introduction to Special Populations, 3 Units

This course will provide an overview of educational practices that influence the identification, placement, and teaching of students with mild to moderate disabilities. The basic principles of special education, including its history, legal mandates, and descriptions of various types of disabling conditions will be examined. Learning problems will be addressed in terms of the specific categories related to mild to moderate disabilities.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

EDLS 304, Introduction to Teaching Special Populations, 3 Units

This course will provide an overview of instructional practices and procedures for assisting the prospective teacher in his role as educator of students with mild to moderate disabilities. It will raise awareness of the exceptional child first and foremost as an individual who is influenced by and must cope with the broad contexts or environments of family, peers, school, and society.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

EDLS 405, Diversity in the Classroom, 3 Units

This course focuses on the examination of the interaction of the student's cultural background with ethics, racial, religious, and gender issues, the educational setting, and wider social forces that affect traditional success and failure for students who are linguistically and culturally different. The course evaluates the role that administrators and teachers play in nurturing a spirit of multiculturalism in schools. Includes service-learning hours in educational settings. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing

EDLS 495, Foundations of Education Capstone, 3 Units

This is the capstone course for seniors in the Liberal Studies program. In this course, students integrate the concepts and skills they have learned throughout their various Liberal Studies courses, apply their knowledge in a classroom service learning experience, and prepare to transition from college to their teaching careers. Students utilize the California State Common Core Standards for the Teaching Profession to reflect on their growth as educators, synthesize their knowledge and service learning experiences from across multiple courses to develop their personal philosophy of education, and generate cross-disciplinary projects that showcase their skills in curriculum development and pedagogy while preparing for the CSET (California Subject Examination for Teachers). In addition, students develop essential job searching and interviewing skills. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: EDLS 496, EDLS 200 or EDLS 202, EDLS 405, and senior standing

EDLS 496, Writing 3: Education and Professional Ethics, 3 Units

This writing 3 course prepares students to develop a written thesis which offers a cogent analysis of a complex topic while defending a clear thesis. Students will understand and express a Christian perspective on issues critical to the education profession through a written thesis. Biblical and theological themes relating to education provide a base, while historical biographies and examples supply a context in which students generate a distinctively Christian response to a contemporary problem facing education. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing, Writing 2

EDLS 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

EDTC 511, Foundations in Educational Technology, 3 Units

This course focuses on developing proficiency with the foundational skills necessary for the Online Master of Arts in Educational Technology. Working in synchronous and asynchronous environments, students utilize a variety of applications and skills necessary for competency in the program.

EDTC 515, Emerging Trends in Technology, 3 Units

This class looks at the historical development of educational technology and the social issues influencing its growth and implementation. Attention is also given to a synthesis of research related to the field, professional organizations serving the discipline and emerging innovative uses of educational technology.

EDTC 517, Digital Communications, 3 Units

This course engages students in collaborative, investigative, and reflective learning opportunities through the exploration of relevant digital communication tools. Attention is given to current modes of communication that utilize a digital platform and effective strategies for implementation within teaching/learning environments.

EDTC 518, Global Learning/Cross-cultural Classroom, 3 Units

This course focuses on the use of technology to develop global, cultural, geographical, environmental, and sociopolitical understanding. Students engage their own classrooms in global learning projects as a vehicle to promote cross-cultural literacy, a necessary skill for the global workforce and the 21st century.

EDTC 520, Managing Tech-Supported Curricular Tools, 3 Units

This course explores managing various technology-supported curricular tools applicable to leadership and instruction in the educational environment. Topics include leadership roles in technology, technology planning, computer applications, and designing a technology implementation plan.

EDTC 521, Digital Imagery for Learning Environments, 3 Units

This course covers a variety of digital imaging and audio applications and their operating tools utilized for teaching/learning environments. Students develop the skills necessary to create, design, and manipulate images along with editing video and audio for digital and/or interactive media.

EDTC 523, Educational Applications of Information Design and Hypermedia, 3 Units

The basics of information design and hypermedia are studied. Topics include the definition and application of information design and hypermedia, the development of hypermedia, the impact of information design on hypermedia, and the impact of hypermedia on society. Students incorporate principles of information design into their hypermedia/global learning projects.

EDTC 524, Instructional Design and Development, 3 Units

This course focuses on the utilization of design principles to effectively communicate instructional and professional materials prepared for the classroom, school/district, and professional development use. Implications on the educational experience of teachers, students, and administrators are also explored. Working in collaboration with other class members, students design an educational presentation/product for professional use.

EDTC 526, Practicum in Educational Applications of Technology, 3 Units

The primary focus of this practicum is a research-designed multimedia portfolio that showcases skills the student has acquired in the Online Educational Technology program. This practicum covers research, use of applied software and educational technologies, a growth assessment, comprehensive e-portfolio, and final presentation to conclude the requirements for the master's degree. This course must be taken at the end of the coursework.

Prerequisite: All coursework in educational technology completed

EDTC 527, Special Topics in Educational Technology, 3 Units

The current technologies, trends, and a variety of special topics in educational technology are explored. The course covers practical and theoretical aspects, effectiveness, and problems related to the implementation of the topic into relevant teaching/learning environments. Different topics may be taken and repeated for credit.

EDTC 599, Readings in Educational Technology, 1-3 Units

Consists of a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and/or writing arranged between, and designed by, a student and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

EDUC 530, Introduction to Research for Practitioners, 1 Unit

This introductory course enables master's degree candidates to develop an understanding of the research process, introducing the basic principles of research and academic writing. Candidates learn to identify the elements of high-quality empirical work, compare qualitative and quantitative methods, and understand research design issues. Through activities integrating theory with practice, students learn how to locate, value, and synthesize other relevant research, identify ethical usage, and utilize appropriate formatting.

Prerequisite: Admission to one of the following M.A. in Education programs: Teaching and Multiple Subject Teaching Credential or Teaching and Single Subject Teaching Credential

EDUC 536, Family, Community, and School Connections, 3 Units

This course focuses on community dynamics, community building, and parental involvement as essential components in education. Successful school reform models of parental involvement are examined, along with their connection to higher student achievement. Master's degree candidates discuss and define their role in building strong partnerships with all families, especially those in underserved communities. They utilize asset-based community-building strategies in educational practice as they explore their school communities and conduct capacity inventories. Candidates develop an ethnography representing their deepening understanding of who their students are, how the families and communities in which they are embedded help shape them, and how they can utilize this knowledge to enhance holistic development of students through their practice.

Prerequisite: EDUC 530

EDUC 537, Curriculum Development, Revision, and Evaluation Process, 3 Units

This course applies a systems approach to curriculum design through examining the phases of the process, including analysis, design, development, and evaluation. Master's degree candidates are introduced to keys of effective curriculum design, including setting goals and developing clear and measurable objectives; determining related learning activities and resources to promote learning and accomplish objectives; designing and/or selecting appropriate forms of assessment (formative and summative) to chart student progress; and using multiple forms of feedback for assessing instructional effectiveness, to inform future modifications and revisions. Students learn the purpose of and approach to each phase of the instructional design process and create products for each phase in completing a curriculum design project.

Prerequisite: EDUC 530

EDUC 538, Current Issues in Education, 3 Units

In this course, master's degree candidates investigate, analyze, discuss, and propose solutions for the most significant problems, concerns, and challenges in education today. The course includes four areas of concentration: curriculum, with a focus on instructional design; teaching practice; school organization; and the politics of education. Candidates study current research relevant to course topics, analyze varying perspectives, and evaluate them in terms of teaching and learning effectiveness as well as the quality of life in the school community. Through compilation and synthesis of empirical work on a specific topic area, candidates craft a literature review to demonstrate expertise in current trends and future directions of research.

Prerequisite: EDUC 530

EDUC 539, Capstone Seminar, 2 Units

Culminating the M.A. completer courses, the capstone seminar builds on the coursework representing students' repertoire of academic preparation throughout the credential and master's programs. Master's candidates create and compile assignments in an efolio profiling their professional identities (personal philosophy, identity and dispositions narrative), their scholarly work (ethnography, curriculum assessment, literature review), and their practical applications (lesson and unit plans, classroom management) in the classroom. This seminar refines and contributes further to a body of work representing the teacher candidate's accomplishments and professional identity. Finally, candidates enhance their understanding and experience of a community's connection to the school environment.

Prerequisite: EDUC 530, EDUC 536, EDUC 537, and EDUC 538; may be taken concurrently: TEP 552 or TEP 562

EDUC 540, Essentials in Learning and Technology, 1 Unit

This course focuses on introducing and developing proficiency with the essential skills necessary for the Master of Arts in Education: Learning and Technology emphasis. Students utilize a variety of applications and skills necessary for competency in the program. This course must be taken in the first term of the program.

Prerequisite: Admission into a M.A. in Education: Learning and Technology program: Mild/Moderate Disabilities Education Specialist Credential, Moderate/Severe Disabilities Education Specialist Credential, Multiple Subject Teaching or Single Subject Teaching Credential

EDUC 546, Digital Communications, 3 Units

This course engages students in collaborative, investigative, and reflective learning opportunities through the exploration of relevant digital communication tools. Attention is given to current modes of communication that utilize a digital platform, and effective strategies for implementation within teaching/learning environments.

Prerequisite: EDUC 540

EDUC 547, Special Topics in Educational Technology, 3 Units

Current technologies, trends, and a variety of special topics in educational technology are explored. This course covers practical and theoretical aspects, effectiveness, and problems related to the implementation of the topic into relevant teaching/learning environments. Different topics may be taken and repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: EDUC 540, or permission of program to take course as elective

EDUC 548, Emerging Trends in Technology, 3 Units

This course covers the historical development of educational technology and the social issues influencing its growth and implementation. Attention is also given to a synthesis of research related to the field, professional organizations serving the discipline, and emerging innovative uses of educational technology.

Prerequisite: EDUC 540

EDUC 549, Capstone Experience in Learning and Technology, 2 Units

The primary focus of this capstone experience is a research-designed multimedia eportfolio that showcases skills and concepts the student has acquired in the Master of Arts in Education: Learning and Technology program. This course incorporates each student's research, use of applied technologies in learning and technology, a growth assessment, a comprehensive eportfolio, and defense. The course must be taken at the end of the program, and passed in order to meet the final requirements for the master's degree.

Prerequisite: EDUC 540, EDUC 546, EDUC 547, and EDUC 548; may be taken concurrently: TEP 552, TEP 562, SPED 552, or SPED 572

EDUC 550, Introduction to Research for Practitioners, 1 Unit

This introductory course enables master's degree candidates to develop an understanding of the research process, introducing the basic principles of research and academic writing. Candidates identify the elements of high-quality empirical work, compare qualitative and quantitative methods, and come to understand research design issues. Through activities integrating theory with practice, students learn how to locate, value, and synthesize other relevant research, identify ethical usage, and utilize appropriate formatting.

Prerequisite: Admission to one of the following Master of Arts in Education programs: Special Education and Mild/Moderate Disabilities Specialist Credential, or Special Education and Moderate/Severe Disabilities Specialist Credential.

EDUC 556, Historical and Philosophical Perspectives of Disability Studies, 3 Units

This course explores and analyzes the historically key definitions of disability in light of the major theories, methodological approaches, and proposed public policy uses that have shaped them. It also considers how civil rights, human rights, self-determination, social policy, and participative action research have influenced disability studies. A diverse set of current and historical research articles on disability studies is analyzed to model the ways in which different research topics have been addressed and introduce how current research can stimulate future studies. Emphasis is given to the formulation of important research questions and the development of testable hypotheses based on previous theory, literature, and experience, as master's candidates begin to develop initial sections of their capstone research project.

Prerequisite: EDUC 550

EDUC 557, Current Trends in Curriculum and Disability Studies, 3 Units

This course equips candidates with practical and theoretical understanding of curriculum in schooling, with an emphasis on the role performed by the special education teacher or "Differentiation Expert." Course material covers the various approaches to curriculum construction and organization in schools by examining the principles of curriculum improvement, change, and evaluation. Focus is on the theories, research, and best practices related to planning and developing curriculum and its implementation in schools and classrooms in order to address the needs of students in diverse communities.

Prerequisite: EDUC 550

EDUC 558, Guided Research Project, 3 Units

This advanced course enables master's degree candidates in special education to become informed users and designers of educational research. Building upon earlier courses, candidates continue to examine educational research within the special education framework, with an emphasis on consumption, design, and application. Through activities integrated with their own inquiry processes, candidates refine their ability to locate, value, and synthesize relevant research, as well as select and employ appropriate research approaches, procedures, data sources, and analytical methods. Using these skills, candidates incorporate the sections drafted in previous research core courses to develop and implement a cohesive, data-driven research plan for their own classroom or school-based inquiry, using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods approaches, as appropriate. Standards for writing research papers are also highlighted. Candidates complete the capstone project and submit findings in the Procedures and Findings section.

Prerequisite: EDUC 550, EDUC 556, EDUC 557

EDUC 559, Procedures and Findings, 2 Units

This course is a sequel to the Guided Research Project section, and is designed to help researcher-educators develop the capstone reporting processes and procedures sections, as well as to refine and submit the completed project. Candidates continue to examine educational research within the special education framework. Through quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods, candidates incorporate all pieces developed in previous research core courses and implement, analyze, and report findings for their data-driven research plan. Candidates work independently, provide feedback to and receive feedback from peers, and hold conference with their instructor to review their data analyses and results and to effectively revise and edit their completed project. This course enables candidates to complete their own research inquiry process and submit a final research report.

Prerequisite: EDUC 558; may be taken concurrently: SPED 552 or SPED 572

SPED 500, Candidate Support and Supervision, 1-3 Units

This course allows Special Education Teacher Candidates to complete unit requirements for their credential or degree program. Current educational practices and a variety of special topics in the field of special education are explored, and course material covers practical and theoretical aspects relevant to the teaching/learning environment. Special Education Intern Candidates may be required to take this course during their program in an effort to meet program requirements while receiving mandated supervision and support. This course may be repeated four (4) times for credit for a total of 4-12 units.

SPED 525, Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing, 3 Units

This course prepares teacher candidates to implement a comprehensive literacy program of systematic instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and language aligned with the California Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and the English Language Arts/English Language Development Framework. Through application of research-based instructional practices, candidates learn specific ways to address the diverse needs of all students.

SPED 526, Specialized Academic Instruction: Reading, Writing, and Math, 3 Units

This course introduces candidates to multifaceted and multitiered methodologies and strategies necessary for teaching and engaging diverse students with disabilities in mathematics and language arts. Candidates become proficient in making explicit connections between ongoing assessment, student characteristics and strengths, instruction, and curriculum. They learn to analyze data to plan effective and differentiated instruction and interventions, and also how to collaboratively design effective IEP goals while considering the role of technology in those goals.

SPED 527, Teaching Students with Moderate to Severe Disabilities, 3 Units

This course provides teacher candidates with a systems perspective for understanding and supporting individuals with moderate to severe disabilities and their families who come from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Using a person-centered planning approach, candidates examine effective collaborative strategies for team building, IEP development, joint problem solving, and transition planning. This course covers evidence-based strategies, adaptations, modifications, and technologies that provide access to Common Core standards, functional academics, and life skills. Various models are reviewed, including co-teaching, inclusion, community-based instruction, and vocational training.

SPED 528, Assessment and IEP Development, 3 Units

This course examines current assessment mandates for students with mild to moderate to severe disabilities. Teacher candidates study test development and learn to evaluate assessment tools based on current research-based policies and mandates. Candidates also learn to administer and interpret norm-criterion reference assessment instruments and informal surveys or assessment instruments, and come to understand the influence of cultural and linguistic factors in the development of Individual Education Program (IEP) goals and Individual Transition Plans (ITPs).

Corequisite: SPED 551 or SPED 571

SPED 529, Positive Behavior Supports for Students with Exceptional Needs, 3 Units

This course equips teacher candidates with the skills and legal framework essential to the development of positive behavior supports and self-management outcomes for students with disabilities. Candidates examine foundations of behavior disorders, appropriate communication, and behavioral support strategies that align with best practices. The foundations of functional analysis of behavior that leads to the development of positive behavior intervention plans are examined. Models of collaborative practices that lead to positive relationships and critical partnerships with students, families, educators, and agencies are investigated through skill development and self-analysis.

Corequisite: SPED 552 or SPED 572

SPED 551, Clinical Practice I: Mild to Moderate Disabilities, 2 Units

Students with mild/moderate disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of specific learning disabilities, mild intellectual disabilities, autism, other health impairments, or other identified disabilities for which placement in a classroom for students with mild/moderate disabilities is deemed appropriate. Teacher candidates, as part of their clinical practice, get on-site experience providing the support described in students' Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with mild/moderate disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine students' current levels of performance, planning for students' grade and instructional levels, and capturing data to support progress on annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with California Content Standards. Candidates also monitor students' progress toward instructional goals and state-adopted standards, and, if necessary, identify behaviors impeding learning, and remediate by implementing positive behavior supports. Candidates complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school classrooms, with assignments in classroom grade levels K-12. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

SPED 552, Clinical Practice II: Mild to Moderate Disabilities, 2 Units

Students with mild/moderate disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of specific learning disabilities, mild intellectual disabilities, autism, other health impairments, or other identified disabilities for which placement in a classroom for students with mild/moderate disabilities is deemed appropriate. Teacher candidates, as part of their clinical practice, get on-site experience providing the support described in students' Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with mild/moderate disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine students' current levels of performance, planning for students' grade and instructional levels, and capturing data to support progress on annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with California Content Standards. Candidates also monitor students' progress toward instructional goals and state-adopted standards, and, if necessary, identify behaviors impeding learning, and remediate by implementing positive behavior supports. Candidates complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school classrooms, with assignments in classroom grade levels K-12. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: SPED 551

SPED 571, Clinical Practice I: Moderate to Severe Disabilities, 2 Units

Students with moderate/severe disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of intellectual, behavioral, emotional, communication, sensory, autism spectrum disorder, and/or motor impairments. Teacher candidates, as part of their clinical practice, get on-site experience providing the support described in the students' Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with moderate/severe disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine students' current levels of performance, planning instructional-level annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with California Content Standards, monitoring students' progress toward instructional goals and short-term objectives, and identifying behaviors impeding learning and then remediating by implementing positive behavior supports. Candidates complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school classrooms, with assignments in classroom grade levels K-12. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

SPED 572, Clinical Practice II: Moderate to Severe Disabilities, 2 Units

Students with moderate/severe disabilities require specialized support to address unique learning needs resulting from a range of intellectual, behavioral, emotional, communication, sensory, autism spectrum disorder, and/or motor impairments. Teacher candidates, as part of their clinical practice, get on-site experience providing the support described in the students' Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating an appropriate classroom physical environment for students with moderate/severe disabilities, conducting formal and informal assessments in order to determine students' current levels of performance, planning instructional-level annual goals and short-term objectives that are aligned with California Content Standards, monitoring students' progress toward instructional goals and short-term objectives, and identifying behaviors impeding learning and then remediating by implementing positive behavior supports. Candidates complete a semester of full-time, supervised student teaching in appropriate public school classrooms, with assignments in classroom grade levels K-12. Each placement provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: SPED 571

SPED 599, Readings in Special Education, 1-3 Units

Consists of a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, field experiences, and/or writing arranged between, and designed by, a student and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

TEP 521, Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (K-8), 3 Units

This course prepares teacher candidates to implement a comprehensive literacy program of systematic instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and language aligned with the California Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and the English Language Arts/English Language Development Framework. Through application of research-based instructional practices, candidates learn specific ways to address the diverse needs of all students.

TEP 522, Methods of Teaching Mathematics (K-8), 3 Units

This course engages candidates who are in clinical practice (student teaching or intern placements) in discussion of common challenges faced by teacher candidates in secondary classrooms, and also focuses on content-specific pedagogical strategies by subject matter. Issues addressed include, but are not limited to, teacher beliefs and their effect on student performance; classroom management; effective curriculum and lesson development; culturally appropriate pedagogical practices; the "plan, teach, assess, reflect, and apply" cycle; content-specific strategies for teaching and assessing; and preparation for the workforce. Individual concerns and issues raised during student teaching or during the internship are also addressed.

TEP 523, Methods of Teaching Science (K-8), 2 Units

This course introduces credential candidates to state-adopted K-8 Next Generation Science Standards and the 2016 Science Framework for California Public Schools: Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve, as well as science concepts and principles, scientific investigation, experimentation, and student assessment. Emphasis is on balanced instruction between Disciplinary Core Ideas, Crosscutting Concepts, and Scientific and Engineering Practices as described in the Next Generation Science Standards. This course also focuses on facilitating K-8 students' ability to independently read and comprehend instructional materials and graphic/media representations, integrate mathematical concepts and practices in scientific investigations, develop academic language, engage in disciplinary discourse practices, and understand the connections between science, society, technology, and the environment. The teaching of physical education and health education in grades K-8 is also covered.

Corequisite: TEP 551

TEP 524, Methods of Integrating the Humanities (K-8), 2 Units

This course, intended for students in clinical practice (student teaching or intern placements), introduces methods of connecting moral and civic education with the social sciences and the arts through thematic teaching, in ways that comply with state frameworks and academic content standards, specifically focusing on the California Common Core State Standards. Course material utilizes a wide range of high-quality children's literature and performing and visual arts strategies. Emphasis is on a meaning-centered, diverse humanities curriculum designed to promote critical thinking skills and meet the needs of all students, including those with special needs and those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Corequisite: TEP 552

TEP 531, Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (7-12), 3 Units

This course includes intensive instruction in reading and language arts methods grounded in methodically sound research, to be incorporated in all subject areas. The study of secondary reading and language arts methods includes effective strategies and methods for guiding and developing the content-based reading and writing abilities of all students, including students with varied reading levels and language backgrounds. Teacher candidates examine well-designed systematic instructional programs, and the implementation of California Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for reading and writing in an integrated fashion with the standards for their subject area.

TEP 532, Secondary Pedagogy I: Teaching in Secondary Schools (7-12), 2 Units

This course is designed for individuals who are teaching in middle or high school subject areas, such as math, ELA, social studies, science, art, physical education, music, etc. Teacher candidates in this course explore the teacher's and the students' roles in middle and high school classrooms. This course focuses on the history, development, and reform measures of middle and high schools to create positive environments that foster inquiry and promote a meaningful learning setting, including trends addressing cultural diversity. Aspects of middle and high school covered in this course include student-centered learning; critical teaching skills for making lessons relevant to students (including culturally relevant practices); cognitive and behavioral development as it affects curriculum design; lesson planning; differentiated instruction; use of technology; assessment; and intentional, reflective teaching practices. All assignments are completed in the subject area for which the individual is seeking the Single Subject Teaching Credential.

Corequisite: TEP 561

TEP 533, The Differentiated Classroom: Maximizing Capacity of Each Learner (7-12), 3 Units

This course explores the philosophical and practical aspects of differentiation as defined by the entirety of classroom practice by the interdependence of the key aspects of curriculum, instruction, assessment, the learner, and the learning environment. Teacher candidates engage in activities that support the development of a teaching philosophy and practice that cultivates the K-12 learner as an active participant with a shared understanding of an investment in a differentiated classroom. Teacher candidates develop competence in analyzing and applying knowledge of K-12 students' achievement, instructional needs, social-emotional needs, cultural and language factors, and other relevant data necessary to improve teaching and learning for all students. Candidates also begin the development of an Individualized Learning Plan to gain competence as a reflective practitioner and further develop the professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to meet the expectations for beginning teachers as outlined in the California Teaching Performance Expectations.

TEP 534, Secondary Pedagogy II: Content-Specific Strategies, Teaching, and Assessment (7-12), 2 Units

This course engages candidates who are in clinical practice (student teaching or intern placements) in discussion of common challenges faced by teacher candidates in secondary classrooms, and also focuses on content-specific pedagogical strategies by subject matter. Issues addressed in the course include, but are not limited to, teacher beliefs and their effect on student performance; classroom management; effective curriculum and lesson development; culturally appropriate pedagogical practices; the "plan, teach, assess, reflect, and apply" cycle; content-specific strategies for teaching and assessing; and preparation for the workforce. Individual concerns and issues raised during student teaching or the internship are addressed.

Prerequisite: TEP 532;

Corequisite: TEP 562

TEP 551, Clinical Practice I: Multiple Subject Credential, 2 Units

Clinical practice provides teacher candidates with a culminating preparatory experience toward which the teacher candidate's entire teacher education program has been planned. The purpose is to develop and verify beginning-level teaching competency in candidates by the end of the clinical practice semester, according to standards set by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) and by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). Clinical practice provides a full-time, experience-based program in which teacher candidates (contracted and noncontracted) have opportunities to participate as classroom teachers in schools while supervised by a University Mentor. Focus is given to many areas of background learning and coordinates those areas into a meaningful set of experiences. These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating a positive environment for students with diverse needs, designing and implementing instruction for their multiple subject grade level and learners, promoting and supporting rigorous and appropriate content in their lessons, and reflecting in order to monitor student learning and adjust instruction. Clinical practice also provides teaching experiences with English-language learners and ethnically diverse students. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

TEP 552, Clinical Practice II: Multiple Subject Credential, 2 Units

Clinical Practice provides teacher candidates with a culminating preparatory experience toward which the teacher candidate's entire teacher education program has been planned. The purpose is to develop and verify beginning-level teaching competency in candidates by the end of the Clinical Practice semester, according to standards set by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) and by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). Clinical Practice provides a full-time, experience-based program in which teacher candidates (contracted and noncontracted) have opportunities to participate as classroom teachers in schools while supervised by a University Mentor. Focus is given to many areas of background learning and coordinates those areas into a meaningful set of experiences. These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating a positive environment for students with diverse needs, designing and implementing instruction for their Multiple Subject grade level and learners, promoting and supporting rigorous and appropriate content in their lessons, and reflecting in order to monitor student learning and adjust instruction. Clinical Practice also provides teaching experiences with English-language learners and ethnically diverse students. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: TEP 551

TEP 561, Clinical Practice I: Single Subject Credential, 2 Units

Clinical Practice provides teacher candidates with a culminating preparatory experience toward which the teacher candidate's entire teacher education program has been planned. The purpose is to develop and verify beginning-level teaching competency in candidates by the end of the Clinical Practice semester, according to standards set by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) and by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). Clinical Practice provides a full-time, experience-based program in which Teacher Candidates (contracted and noncontracted) have opportunities to participate as classroom teachers in schools while supervised by a University Mentor. Focus is given to many areas of background learning and coordinates those areas into a meaningful set of experiences. These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating a positive environment for students with diverse needs, designing and implementing instruction for their Single Subject content area and learners, promoting and supporting rigorous and appropriate content in their lessons, and reflecting in order to monitor student learning and adjust instruction. Clinical Practice also provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

TEP 562, Clinical Practice II: Single Subject Credential, 2 Units

Clinical Practice provides teacher candidates with a culminating preparatory experience toward which the teacher candidate's entire teacher education program has been planned. The purpose is to develop and verify beginning-level teaching competency in candidates by the end of the Clinical Practice semester, according to standards set by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) and by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). Clinical Practice provides a full-time, experience-based program in which Teacher Candidates (contracted and noncontracted) have opportunities to participate as classroom teachers in schools while supervised by a University Mentor. Focus is given to many areas of background learning and coordinates those areas into a meaningful set of experiences. These experiences include, but are not limited to, creating a positive environment for students with diverse needs, designing and implementing instruction for their Single Subject content area and learners, promoting and supporting rigorous and appropriate content in their lessons, and reflecting in order to monitor student learning and adjust instruction. Clinical Practice also provides teaching experiences with English language learners and ethnically diverse students. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: TEP 561

TEP 590, Candidate Support and Supervision, 1-3 Units

This course is required for General Education Teacher Candidates to complete unit requirements for their credential or degree program. Current educational practices and a variety of special topics in the field of general education are explored, and course material covers practical and theoretical aspects relevant to the teaching/learning environment. General Education Intern Candidates may be required to take this course during their program in an effort to meet program requirements while receiving mandated supervision and support. This course may be repeated four (4) times for credit for a total of 4-12 units.

TEP 599, Readings in Teacher Education, 1-3 Units

Consists of a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, field experiences, and/or writing arranged between, and designed by, a student and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

TESP 501, Art of Teaching I: Foundations of Teaching, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to basic pedagogy, including classroom management, lesson planning and teaching, standards-based instruction, teaching strategies for students with diverse identities and needs, and the application of technology to support teaching and learning. Teacher candidates consider strategies, models, and processes for meeting the needs of a broad range of K-12 students, including special needs students, gifted students, English language learners, speakers of nondominant varieties of English, and students of all cultural or ethnic identities. This course is designed for direct application of classroom learning by candidates in a collaborative context that implements inclusion. Candidates examine Christian character and develop an understanding of grace in the Christian worldview as applied in classroom contexts, in consideration of meeting the needs of students and building community within the classroom. This course includes 15 hours of required field experience in a K-12 school.

TESP 502, Science of Teaching I: How Students Learn, 3 Units

This course comprises a basic overview of human growth and development for all students in the K-12 environment. Teacher candidates identify how research on the neuroscience of learning, theories of learning, and student motivation affect current understanding of student development through the K-12 education experience. They then creatively and collaboratively investigate how this knowledge can enable them to meet the needs of all students, including underserved populations, English language learners, and individuals with diverse learning needs (from gifted learners to individuals with mild to severe disabilities). Candidates also examine their own cultural beliefs, attitudes toward diversity, and related assumptions, identifying how these might affect student learning and achievement in their classrooms. Candidates demonstrate applied knowledge of communication styles and strategies for fostering positive cross-cultural interactions among students who are diverse in terms of culture, language, and ability. Finally, candidates reflect on the need to support the development of all students from a Christian worldview. This course includes 15 hours of required field experience in a K-12 school. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

TESP 503, The Soul of Teaching: Tapestry of American Education, 3 Units

This course introduces teacher candidates to the history of American education and a sampling of modern philosophies of education, examined through the lens of a Christian worldview. Specific consideration is given to the ways in which historical trends have contributed to today's education system, including how social and philosophical movements, as well as policy changes, have shaped the growth and inclusiveness of education in the U.S. Candidates reflect on the continued need for education equity for all students in U.S. schools, and explore inclusive practices for diverse populations, professional dispositions, teacher resiliency, and their role in perpetuating social justice in education. They engage culturally appropriate response strategies that enhance learning opportunities in a cross-cultural context, and identify how a Christian worldview enables and directs a commitment to principles of equity and justice in their practice. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

TESP 504, Schools and Educational Systems, 3 Units

This course explores the legal, ethical, and organizational systems (federal, state, district, and school) within which teachers conduct their work. Teacher candidates engage in an examination of school and community cultures and their impact on learning, by focusing on the ways teachers communicate and collaborate with external and internal stakeholders to provide equitable access to all students. Additionally, contractual responsibilities and professional expectations are addressed. Candidates also consider the ways in which educators, from a Christian worldview, can advocate to transform social problems impacting school culture. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

TESP 511, Art of Teaching II: Pedagogy and Instructional Design, 3 Units

This course explores pedagogy as the combination of teachers' professional knowledge, skills, and abilities, which are directed to create effective learning opportunities and outcomes for all students in a range of contexts. Building on broad themes from TESP 501 Art of Teaching I, teacher candidates explore pedagogical methods and specific models for meeting individual student needs, utilizing universal and individualized strategies. Attention is given to culturally responsive teaching practices for learners with diverse cultural and ethnic identities, as well as differentiation practices for students with various learning needs. Candidates further analyze the relationship between curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment. Finally, candidates examine and reflect on the Christian worldview in relation to student diversity and developing a climate of equity and collaboration within classrooms. This course includes 15 hours of required field experience in a K-12 school.

Prerequisite: TESP 501

TESP 512, Science of Teaching II: Effective Assessment Strategies for All Learners, 3 Units

This course explores strategies for designing standards and data-driven curricular plans and units to serve diverse student populations (e.g., culturally, linguistically, and/or ability-diverse learners). Teacher candidates engage in the administration and analysis of formative, summative, diagnostic assessment to inform the ongoing development of differentiated instruction that serves the unique academic needs of students from diverse, intersecting backgrounds and identities. In view of the academic achievement gap that exists in California K-12 schools, candidates utilize assessment results, alongside state frameworks and current standards specific to their specialization, in development of further curriculum/planning, instruction, and assessment cycles; these will demonstrate the use of instructional strategies, materials, technologies, and other resources to make content connected, contextualized, and accessible to all students. Candidates consider how a Christian worldview catalyzes their commitment to engage fully in the work of creating classrooms that meet the needs of all their students. This course includes 15 hours of required field experience in a K-12 school.

Prerequisite: TESP 502

Faculty

Department Chair, Advanced Studies; Program Director, M.A. in Educational Technology

Kathleen Fletcher Bacer, Ed.D.

Department Chair, Elementary and Secondary Education; Program Director, Multiple Subject Teaching Credential

Catherine Hahs Brinkley, Ed.D.

Department Chair, Special Education

Craig Bartholio, Ed.D.

Program Director, B.A. in Liberal Studies/Undergraduate Education K-8 Program

Paul Flores, Ph.D.

Program Director, Single Subject Teaching Credential

Jessica Cannaday, Ph.D.

Program Director, Special Education: Mild/Moderate and Special Education: Moderate/Severe Credentials

Angela Guta, Ph.D.

Professors

Kathleen Fletcher Bacer, Ed.D.

Jessica Cannaday, Ph.D.

Jennifer Courduff, Ph.D.

Paul Flores, Ph.D.

Greg Kaiser, Ph.D.

HeeKap Lee, Ph.D.

Associate Professors

Tammy Bachrach, Ph.D.

Richard Barsh, Ed.D.

Janet Hanson, Ed.D.

Assistant Professors

Craig Bartholio, Ed.D.

Kathleen Bautista, Ed.D.

Cynthia Dollins, Ed.D.

Jaquet Dumas, Ph.D.

le May Freeman, Ed.D.

Angela Guta, Ph.D.

Catherine Hahs Brinkley, Ed.D.

Amber Lynwood, Ed.D.

Regula Schmid, Ed.D.

Alicia Watkin, Ed.D.