School of Education

The School of Education at Azusa Pacific University equips teachers, counselors, school psychologists and administrators for excellence and leadership in educational settings.

The School of Education at Azusa Pacific University equips teachers, counselors, school psychologists, and administrators for excellence and leadership in educational settings. The school provides an Ed.D. program in Educational Leadership, Ed.S. degrees in School Psychology, master’s programs, teaching credentials, and specialist credentials in educational technology, special education, school counseling, school psychology, and teaching. The school also offers an undergraduate major and minor in liberal studies.

For a full listing of programs and affiliated faculty, visit the appropriate department or division pages: Educational Leadership, School Counseling and School Psychology, and Teacher Education.

Mission Statement

Based upon Christian values and principles, the APU School of Education prepares educators to be creative, collaborative, critical thinkers and scholars for diverse educational settings.

Learner Goals

The School of Education seeks to prepare:

  1. Ethical professionals who understand and articulate the integration of a Christian worldview in their communities of practice.
  2. Responsive educators who practice reflective, creative, critical thinking in their engagement with diverse communities of learners.
  3. Informed scholarly professionals who are dedicated to collaboration, professional growth, and lifelong learning.

Affiliated Programs

APU offers a number of California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC)-approved subject-matter programs for candidates completing their bachelor’s degrees. The following programs can be used to meet the subject matter authorization requirement for a preliminary teaching credential:

In collaboration with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the School of Education offers the Integrated Bachelor’s/Credential Program to undergraduate students seeking to earn a preliminary teaching credential during their undergraduate degree program.

Graduate Physical Education Programs

APU offers programs in graduate physical education. The Master of Arts in Physical Education and Single Subject Teaching Credential, Master of Arts in Physical Education with an Added Authorization in Adapted Physical Education, and the Adapted Physical Education Added Authorization programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE, transitioning to CAEP) and are approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC). For more information, visit the School of Behavioral and Applied Sciences.

School Librarianship Programs

APU offers programs in school librarianship. These programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE, transitioning to CAEP) and are approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC). For more information, visit University Libraries.

School Nurse Services Credential

APU offers a program in school nursing services. The School Nurse Services Credential (SNSC) is approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC). For more information, visit the School of Nursing.

School Social Work and Child Welfare and Attendance PPS Credential

APU offers a Pupil Personnel Services credential program in school social work and child welfare and attendance, which is approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC). For more information, visit the Department of Social Work section of this catalog.

Professional School-Level Dispositions

The School of Education has adopted a set of professional dispositions that represent the attitudes and behaviors expected of all education professionals, and reflect the values that are central to the School of Education mission. In addition to maintaining satisfactory academic progress, candidates are expected to demonstrate these dispositions throughout all education programs. Candidates who fail to meet the dispositional requirements will be evaluated for fitness to practice in the profession.

Minimum Requirements for Credential Students

Certain designated courses within the School of Education (e.g., fieldwork, clinical practice, etc.) are graded on a Credit (CR)/No Credit (NC) basis. A grade of NC is interpreted as a failing grade, which can have implications for a student’s continued satisfactory progress and academic standing.

Students who earn an NC grade are required to meet with their program director or chair to identify knowledge, skills, and/or dispositions that may need strengthening and to develop a performance improvement plan. Students who earn an NC grade will be placed on probation and given one enrollment period to demonstrate satisfactory progress according to the terms of the improvement plan. Students who do not meet the standards for satisfactory progress after a period of probation may be dismissed from the program.

Students are expected to successfully complete their culminating clinical practice on their first attempt. On rare occasions, students with unsuccessful first attempts will be eligible to petition the appropriate academic department to repeat the course. A successful petition is required for a student to repeat. A culminating clinical practice, fieldwork, or internship course can be repeated only once.

Students who earn an NC grade in a culminating clinical practice as a result of a lapse in professional responsibility, integrity, or ethical conduct may not be eligible to petition to repeat the course for which they received the nonpassing grade.

Credit Hour

The School of Education follows the University credit hour policy, except when clinical experience expectations from our professional accrediting bodies have expectations for more clock hours. Clinical experience expectations are guided by our professional accrediting bodies.
 
Department of School Counseling and School Psychology
  • School Counseling – The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) requires a minimum of six hundred clock hours of supervised fieldwork/internship. This equates to six units of fieldwork/internship within the program.
  • School Psychology – The CTC requires a minimum of four hundred and fifty clock hours of practicum experience. This equates to three units of practicum within the program. Additionally, the CTC requires a minimum of twelve hundred clock hours of supervised fieldwork/internship. This equates to ten units of fieldwork/internship within the program.
  • Applied Behavioral Analysis Specialization – The Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) requires a minimum of 1,500 clinical hours for individuals applying for Certification before 1/1/2022 and 2,000 clinical hours for individuals apply for Certification 1/1/2022 and after. The ABA program includes two fieldwork courses that have assignments that must be completed in the field under the supervision of a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) or School Psychologist. The time necessary to complete the assignments equates to approximately two hundred hours of fieldwork clock hours. These fieldwork courses support students toward meeting their clinical requirements for the BACB, and these courses equate to two units of fieldwork within the program.
Division of Teacher Education
  • Preliminary Teaching Credential Programs – The CTC requires six hundred clock hours of clinical experiences. A minimum of sixty hours of early field experiences are embedded in foundations courses while a minimum five hundred and forty hours of clinical practice is completed at student teaching or internship. This equates to four units of clinical practice within the program.

Faculty

Dean

Anita Fitzgerald Henck, Ph.D.

Associate Dean for External Partnerships

Kent Bechler, Ph.D.

Assistant Dean for Academic Planning and Accreditation

Rebekah Harris, M.S.

Assistant Dean for Outreach and Engagement

Nori Conner, M.A.

Professors

Kathleen Fletcher Bacer, Ed.D.

Lewis Bonney, Ph.D.

Jessica Cannaday, Ph.D.

Jennifer Courduff, Ph.D.

Michelle Cox, Ph.D.

Randy Fall, Ph.D.

Paul Flores, Ph.D.

Anita Fitzgerald Henck, Ph.D.

Ying Hong Jiang, Ph.D.

Gregory Kaiser, Ph.D.

HeeKap Lee, Ph.D.

Robert Martin, Ph.D.

David R. Morrison, Ed.D.

Calvin Roso, Ed.D.

Associate Professors

Tammy Bachrach, Ph.D.

Richard Barsh, Ed.D.

Janet Hanson, Ed.D.

Stacy Kula, Ph.D.

Pedro Olvera, Psy.D.

Assistant Professors

Roberta Alba, Ed.D.

Craig Bartholio, Ed.D.

Kathleen Bautista, Ed.D.

Catherine Hahs Brinkley, Ed.D.

Jaquet Dumas, Ph.D.

Ie May Freeman, Ed.D.

Maria J. Gross, Ed.D.

Angela J. Guta, Ph.D.

Julia “Judy” Johnson, Ed.D.

Maureen E. Latham, Ed.D., Superintendent in Residence

Amber Lynwood, Ed.D.

Heather Maguire, Psy.D.

Gregory Plutko, Ed.D., Superintendent in Residence

Michael Salce, Ed.D.

Regula Schmid, Ed.D.

Robert Taylor, Ed.D., Superintendent in Residence