Bachelor of Social Work

APU’s Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program prepares students to meet the demand for skilled, compassionate social workers in a wide variety of fields.

Mission Statement

The Bachelor of Social Work program at Azusa Pacific University seeks to develop competent generalist social work practitioners who can apply knowledge, values, and skills of social work, integrating a Christian perspective, in order to enhance the well-being of diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities, advancing social justice locally and globally.

Program Values

The undergraduate social work program is grounded in the profession’s history and commitment to social justice and diversity and in the university’s commitment to advancing God’s work in the world by being of service, advancing human rights, and promoting the dignity and worth of all people. The program is committed to excellence in its teaching and scholarship based on scientific inquiry, to the integration of Christian faith in learning and practice, and to the facilitation of community within the department, with students, and within the greater environment.

BSW Program Goals

  1. To prepare students for professional social work practice with diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities, locally and globally
  2. To provide knowledge based on scientific inquiry, built on a liberal arts foundation of human behavior and the interaction of person and environment
  3. To prepare students for lifelong learning, critical thinking, and advanced study
  4. To equip students for collaboration with the community, advocating for the development of policies, resources, and programs that seek to advance human well-being, promote social and economic justice, empower clients, and respect diversity
  5. To educate students regarding the values and ethics of the profession, and to the integration of Christian values throughout their practice
  6. To engage in ongoing scholarship reflecting the goals and needs of professional social work practice

In their courses, BSW students learn the knowledge, values, and skills to help them engage, assess, provide intervention, and evaluate their direct practice with individuals, groups, families, and communities. Additionally, students are encouraged to think critically, become aware of their affective reactions, exercise good judgment, and use self-reflection as part of their professional development. During their senior year, students complete a supervised 400+-hour internship at a community-based agency where they apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to professional environments and client groups to gain experience.

Career Opportunities

Social workers provide services to individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers can apply their training and experience in a variety of practice areas, including:

   
Addictions Prevention and Treatment Homeless Individual/Families Assistance
Adoption and Foster Care Hospice and Palliative Care
Advocacy Consulting and Planning Housing Assistance
Charter/Alternative School Programs In-home Services
Child Abuse and Neglect International Social Work
Child Welfare Services Law/Courts/Community
Criminal Justice Medical Social Work
Crisis Intervention Mental Health Counseling
Community Mental Health Military Social Work
Community Planning and Advocacy Parent Education
Delinquent/At-risk Youth Police Work
Developmental Disabilities Political Planning and Lobbying
Disaster Relief Prisons and Probation
Eating Disorders Public Health
Employee Assistance Programs Rural/Tribal Social Work
Genetics/Transplant School Social Work
Gerontology/Older Adult Services Skilled Nursing Social Work

Accreditation

The undergraduate program in the Department of Social Work has been nationally accredited since 1982 by the Council on Social Work Education.

Advising and Admission

Advising

Any student interested in social work is encouraged to speak with someone from the BSW program for more information about the major. Students who wish to major in social work should declare “Social Work Interest” as their intended major as soon as possible through the Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center in order to begin academic and professional planning. Upon declaring “Social Work Interest” as a major, students are assigned an academic success coach by the Academic Success Center. Students meet with their assigned coach to create an initial multiyear academic plan, and BSW faculty-mentor advisors are assigned by the BSW program. The role of the BSW faculty-mentor advisor is to provide additional academic advisement, in coordination with the academic success coach, and mentor students in their professional development. While the BSW faculty-mentor advisor is the primary contact person within the program, students are encouraged to utilize all BSW faculty office hours as needed for professional development. Students are strongly encouraged to meet with their academic success coach and/or BSW faculty-mentor advisor prior to registration each semester.

Students later apply to the major (see “Admission to the Program” section below). Upon full admission to the program, student status is changed from “Social Work Interest” to “Social Work” by the Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center.

Procedure

  1. Schedule an appointment, if necessary, to discuss social work as a choice of major.
  2. Declare “Social Work Interest” as a major through the Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center.
  3. Contact the BSW office to receive your advisor assignment and the BSW Student Handbook.
  4. Read the BSW Student Handbook in its entirety.
  5. Meet with assigned success coach to develop a multiyear academic plan and confirm choice of major.
  6. Meet with your academic success coach and/or BSW faculty mentor advisor for academic advising prior to registration each semester.

Note: Advisors assist in planning, but students are responsible to come prepared for advising and be knowledgeable regarding university requirements.

Admission to the Program

Students are considered “Social Work Interest” by the registrar until formally accepted into the program. Prior to formal acceptance into the program, students should begin advising within the BSW program and can begin taking entry-level social work courses and the General Education courses that apply to social work, as outlined in the university catalog.

The BSW program reviews applications in the fall and spring semesters for currently enrolled students. Application deadlines are March 7 (fall admission) and November 7 (spring admission). Late applications may be considered on a case-by-case basis depending on the number of accepted students. 

Transfer social work applicants planning to enter APU at the junior level (45 or more units) must submit the BSW Application for Admission in order to be considered for full acceptance into the social work program. Submit your application to the BSW program at the same time you submit your university application. Students transferring in prior to their junior year (less than 45 units) begin the major as “Social Work Interest,” and submit applications prior to their junior year after starting at the university. Transfer students should seek academic advising through the Academic Success Center and within the BSW program as soon as possible to begin planning coursework.

Students may be admitted fully, or on provisional status, or denied admission. If a student is admitted on provisional status, a plan for attaining full admission is provided by the committee. If this plan is not met in full, the student is not allowed to continue in the program. If denied admission, the student may initiate an appeal procedure, as outlined in the BSW Student Handbook.

University-Admitted APU Students

Students admitted to the university and interested in pursuing the social work major should submit their BSW Application for Admission directly to the BSW program. Applications are reviewed by the Social Work Advising and Admissions Committee, composed of social work faculty, and is considered based on academic and personal readiness for the program.

Admission Requirements

  1. A 2.5 overall GPA
  2. Completion of or enrollment in SOCW 250 Introduction to Social Work (full acceptance requires completion of this course with a C or better).
  3. Acknowledgment of the ability to adhere to the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics.
  4. Acknowledgment of the ability to meet BSW Technical Standards and maintain professional behavior consistent with the Student Code of Conduct, both of which are outlined in the BSW Student Handbook.
  5. Submission of a personal statement providing responses to the following:
    1. What influenced your choice of social work as a profession? Include when and how you became interested in the field of social work.
    2. What personal, volunteer, and/or employment experiences have you had, and/or what characteristics do you possess, that will contribute to your work as a professional in the field of social work?
    3. Social workers practice with diverse people groups in diverse settings. What groups and/or settings may challenge you because of either your personal values, attitudes, and/or experiences? How will you handle this?
    4. Social work often involves assisting individuals, families, groups, and communities in problem-solving. Give a brief description of a problem you have encountered in an employment or volunteer situation and how you resolved it. If you have neither employment nor volunteer experience, you may discuss a personal challenge that you faced. 
    5. The profession of social work has identified 12 Grand Challenges that reflect the purpose and mission of the social work field. Referencing the challenges, select one or more of them that align with your personal and professional interests. Utilizing the challenge(s) selected, respond to the following:
      • Discuss how your professional goals align with the efforts of the challenge(s) selected. Why is the challenge selected important and how does it connect to your interest in the social work profession?
      • Discuss the significance of the challenge(s) selected based on your personal faith beliefs or values. For example, why should people who identify as Christians be concerned with the challenge selected?

Procedure

  1. Completion of or enrollment in SOCW 250 Introduction to Social Work (full acceptance requires completion of the course with a C or better)
    1. Note: transfer students with more than 45 units can apply prior to completing SOCW 250 Introduction to Social Work.
  2. Complete all sections of the application, including complete responses to the personal statement questions.
  3. Submit an unofficial APU transcript, or transcript of coursework completed elsewhere if a transfer.
  4. Submit completed application to the BSW program for review by March 7 (fall admission) or November 7 (spring admission). Late applications and transfer students are evaluated on a case-by-case basis and as space allows.
  5. Submit additional materials and/or interview with the BSW program director at the request of the Admissions Committee.
  6. Students are notified in writing within three weeks of the Admissions Committee’s decision.

Evaluation Criteria for Personal Statements

Admission decisions for the BSW program are based upon a review of academic performance, completion of SOCW 250 as a prerequisite with a C or better (can be enrolled in the course for provisional admission), relevant work or volunteer experience, quality of written personal statement, and relevant experience as indicated in the résumé submission. If needed, a student may be asked to complete a formal interview with the BSW program director and/or submit letters of reference that can support the student’s readiness for a career in social work. The Admissions Committee may seek additional information from the social work faculty, the applicant, or other formal sources. The committee focuses on academic achievement as well as criteria that demonstrate a commitment to social work values, beginning understanding of the social work profession, professional attitude and behavior, emotional maturity, and ability to express oneself clearly—orally and in writing.

Following review by the committee, the applicant is notified in writing of the committee’s decision. Committee options include full admission, provisional admission with terms outlined, and denial of admission.

Admissions Appeals Process

Any student who is dissatisfied with a decision for admission may request an in-person review with the Admissions Committee, in which they can supply further verbal and written evidence in regard to the committee’s actions. The committee then provides a written response to the student within one week of the hearing. If the student is still in disagreement, he/she may appeal to the dean of the School of Behavioral and Applied Sciences.

Requirements

Coursework for the social work major covers topics such as clinical interviewing and case management skills, human rights and social justice, community transformation and leadership, child welfare, group dynamics, and more.

A total of 69 units is required for the major, and a minimum 2.5 grade-point average (GPA) is required in all major courses, including specified General Education courses. Students must pass all required courses with a C or higher, and must maintain a 2.5 GPA to remain in the major.

Specified General Education Requirements9
General Psychology 1
Introduction to Sociology 1
Social Justice Foundations for Human Rights 2
Biology Requirement4
Select one of the following: 3
Biology and Society 4
General Biology I 4
Core Requirements
MATH 130Introduction to Statistics 53
SOCW 250Introduction to Social Work 63
SOCW 251Social Welfare Policy and Service3
SOCW 310Human Behavior and the Social Environment I3
SOCW 311Human Behavior and the Social Environment II3
SOCW 332Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families3
SOCW 333Social Work Practice with Communities and Organizations 73
SOCW 350Aging: Implications for Policy and Practice3
SOCW 351Child Welfare3
SOCW 360Social Work Practice with Groups3
SOCW 466Field Internship I4
SOCW 468Field Internship II4
SOCW 467Senior Practicum Seminar I 7, 83
SOCW 469Senior Practicum Seminar II 73
SOCW 478Social Work Research Methods 73
SOCW 479Writing 3: Social Work Research Project 93
Social Work Electives 106
Select one of the following:
Understanding International Social Problems and Services through Study Abroad
Fundraising, Grant Writing, and Fiscal Decision Making
Intimate Relationship Violence: Assessment and Intervention
Substance Use Disorders: Assessment and Intervention
Suffering: Theological and Practical Perspectives on Disabilities
Introduction to International Development
Introduction to Nonprofit Management
Social Work and Law
Readings in Social Work
Fundraising, Grant Writing, and Fiscal Decision Making
Social Work Practice in Healthcare Settings
International Social Work Policy and Practice
Select another course from the above group or one of the following:
The Asian American Experience
The African American Experience
The Chicano(a)/Latino(a) Experience
Principles and Practice of Community Engagement (available only through study away) 6
Ministry Organization and Administration
Christian Values and Human Sexuality
Theory and Practice of Public Administration
Abnormal Psychology
Psychology of Exceptional Children
Intervention Strategies with Children
Psychosocial Interventions in Pediatric Health Care
Counseling Theory
Human Diversity 2
The Sociology of Gender
Social Movements
Crime and Delinquency
Social Stratification
Practical Ethics
Ethics
Total Units69

Suggested Plan of Study

A minimum of 120 units is needed to graduate. This includes units toward General Education, major, and/or minor requirements.

Plan of Study Grid
Year I
FallUnits
GE 100 First-Year Seminar (required first term) 3
MIN 108 Christian Life, Faith, and Ministry 3
WRIT 110 Writing 1: The Art and Craft of Writing 3
PSYC 110 General Psychology 3
SOCW 250 Introduction to Social Work 3
 Units15
Spring
UBBL 100 Introduction to Biblical Literature: Exodus/Deuteronomy 3
PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy 3
Writing 2 3
BIOL 101 Biology and Society 4
SOC 120 Introduction to Sociology 3
 Units16
Year II
Fall
UBBL 230 Luke/Acts 3
Foreign Language 1 1 3
Fine Arts 3
SOCW 275 Social Justice Foundations for Human Rights 3
SOCW 310 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I 3
 Units15
Spring
Upper Division Bible Course 3
Foreign Language 2 1 3
COMM 111 Public Communication 3
SOCW 251 Social Welfare Policy and Service 3
SOCW 311 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 3
 Units15
Year III
Fall
Theology 3
Literature 3
MATH 130 Introduction to Statistics 3
SOCW 332 Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families 3
SOCW 351 Child Welfare 3
 Units15
Spring
History 3
Physical Education 1
SOCW 333 Social Work Practice with Communities and Organizations 3
SOCW 350 Aging: Implications for Policy and Practice 3
SOCW 360 Social Work Practice with Groups 3
Minor or Elective Units 3
 Units16
Year IV
Fall
SOCW 466 Field Internship I 4
SOCW 467 Senior Practicum Seminar I 3
SOCW 478 Social Work Research Methods 3
Social Work Elective (1 of 2) 3
Minor or Elective Units 3
 Units16
Spring
SOCW 468 Field Internship II 4
SOCW 469 Senior Practicum Seminar II 3
SOCW 479 Writing 3: Social Work Research Project 3
Social Work Elective (2 of 2) 3
 Units13
 Total Units121

Field Internships

Field education is a required component of the BSW curriculum. The field application and placement process occurs during the term prior to the onset of field internships. Students complete a 400+-hour internship with a focus on applying and integrating professional social work knowledge, values, and skills in a supervised community agency setting. Students are concurrently enrolled in field seminar during field internship terms. Course credit is not given for life experiences or for previous or current work experience. Students are required to obtain their own malpractice insurance prior to entering their field internship. Information regarding insurance is available through the BSW program. Students are responsible for ensuring they have reliable transportation to and from field internship agencies.

Field education faculty select field internship sites using strict criteria consistent with accreditation standards set forth by the Council on Social Work Education, including the congruence of field agency mission and goals with professional social work ethics and standards. Field agencies must also provide student supervision consistent with accreditation requirements.

Additional information regarding field education can be found in the Field Education Manual.

Transfer of Credits

Students transferring from CSWE-accredited undergraduate social work programs may submit to their advisor a list of social work courses completed within the last five years for evaluation for transfer of credits. Each course will be evaluated by the department on a case-by-case basis for compatibility with program requirements. General Education requirements for the major will be assessed by the Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center. Students who leave the BSW program must reapply for admission to the BSW program if the absence is two years or more. Course credit is not given for life experiences or for previous or current work experience.

Social Work Student Conduct Code

In addition to maintaining academic standards, students must demonstrate professional expectations and adherence to the Department of Social Work conduct code. Violation of the code may result in probation or termination from the program. Refer to the BSW Student Handbook (PDF) for the full description of the conduct code and appeals process.

Program Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully complete this program shall be able to:
  1. Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior.
  2. Engage in diversity and differences in practice.
  3. Advance human rights and social, economic and environmental justice.
  4. Engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice.
  5. Engage in policy practice.
  6. Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
  7. Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
  8. Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
  9. Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
  10. Critically analyze how Christian beliefs and values can be ethically integrated in professional social work practice.

Program Competencies/Learning Outcomes

Students will demonstrate these competencies (CSWE, 2015):

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities f the profession. Social works also understand the role of other professions when engaged in interprofessional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of lifelong learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice. Social workers:

  • make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulation, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context;
  • use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations;
  • demonstrates professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication;
  • use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes; and
  • use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a cultures’ structures and values, including, social, economic, political, and culture exclusions, may recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate or create privilege and power. Social workers:

  • apply and communicate an understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping the experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels;
  • present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences; and
  • apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, and an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies designed to eliminate oppressive, environmental, economic, social and cultural human rights are protected. Social workers:

  • apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels; and
  • engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 4: Engage in Practice-Informed Research and Research-Informed Practice

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multidisciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the process for translating research:

  • use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research;
  • apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative research methods and research findings; and
  • use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy, and service delivery.

Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structure of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice in practice settings at micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation. Social workers:

  • identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services;
  • assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services; and
  • apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilities engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may impact their ability to effectively engage with diverse clients and constituencies. Social workers value principles of relationship-building and inter-professional collaboration to facilitate engagement with clients, constituencies and other professional as appropriate. Social workers:

  • apply knowledge to human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies; and
  • use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision making. Social workers:

  • collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies;
  • apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies;
  • develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies; and
  • select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence-informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing, and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration. Social workers:

  • critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies;
  • apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the interventions with clients and constituencies;
  • use interprofessional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes; and
  • facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals.

Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness. Social workers:

  • select and use appropriate method for evaluation of outcomes;
  • apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluations of outcomes;
  • critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes; and
  • apply evaluation findings to improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

Competency 10: Critically Analyze How Christian Beliefs and Values Can be Ethically Integrated in Professional Social Work Practice

Social workers understand the role of spirituality and faith as part of a holistic approach to social practice and in understanding human behavior and the social environment. Social workers apply ethical principles in the integration of faith in practice, mindful of their own beliefs and impact on the helping relationship. Social workers recognize that faith communities are part of the cultural context of individuals, families, and communities, and provide protective as well as risk factors in the process of change. In this context, social workers articulate how Christian beliefs and values can be ethically integrated in professional social work practice. They:

  • demonstrate self-awareness of their own worldview, as it relates to a Christian worldview;
  • articulate how a Christian worldview is integrated into social work practice; and
  • critically analyze how Christian, spiritual, or religious traditions assist or hinder the helping process.