Department of Psychology

The Department of Psychology equips students with the skills necessary for the observation, understanding, and analysis of human behavior.

The Department of Psychology at Azusa Pacific University assists students in developing the skills necessary for the observation, understanding, and analysis of human behavior. In their study of psychology, students are trained to employ systematic methods of inquiry to explain normal and abnormal behavior, examining a number of factors including neural, cognitive, developmental, cultural, interpersonal, and individual differences. Students also engage in the development of their strengths and skills in personal, intellectual, and spiritual areas.

Each faculty member is a committed Christian with an interest in the individual student. As a department, the faculty are committed to preparing students for a wide range of postbaccalaureate work in psychology or related disciplines, and helping students reflect upon the relationship of psychology to the Christian faith. Programs and activities associated with psychology are planned by the faculty, the Psychology Club, and the Psi Chi honor society to create a spirit of community. These activities include graduate school forums in which students interact with Christian psychology professionals, as well as informal gatherings where psychology majors receive information to help them successfully navigate their program requirements, meet other students, and understand career opportunities.

The design of the undergraduate curriculum reflects the extensive breadth of psychology and provides internship experience in applied field or research settings. There are two undergraduate degrees offered: the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Psychology. While the degrees overlap in their core courses, the focuses in terms of elective courses are different—the B.A. program focuses on the applied areas of understanding the human condition, and the B.S. program focuses on the scientific methods used to study behavior, emphasizing research skills.

The department also offers undergraduates a psychology minor and an alcohol and drug counseling minor.

At the graduate and professional level, the department comprises an energetic community of scholars equipping students to understand the field of psychology through academically rigorous coursework, hands-on laboratory research, internships with community agencies, and individual research projects. The department offers a Master of Science in Research Psychology and Data Analysis, a Master of Science in Child Life (including an Advanced Standing option), a Master of Science in Counseling Psychology with Specialization in Children and Adolescents, a bachelor’s completion program in psychology for transfer students who have at least 30 units of college credit, and professional minors in psychology and alcohol and drug counseling.

Mission Statement

The Department of Psychology at APU is a community of Christian scholars who, with their diverse backgrounds and expertise in understanding human behavior in society, are committed to enhancing the development of our students through intellectual challenge, experiential learning, personal growth, and spiritual discovery so that each student develops his or her potential and is prepared for where God is leading them to serve.

Career Opportunities

Study in psychology provides a foundational background for a broad variety of careers in which the understanding of human behavior and social processes is useful. Graduates with a bachelor’s degree in psychology have a foundational background for entry-level jobs in mental health or community service agencies, business, and human resources. For advanced positions requiring testing, counseling, or consulting, a master’s degree is generally the minimum requirement, while psychologists with doctoral degrees qualify for more advanced counseling, research, and teaching positions. Psychology majors with advanced degrees may pursue careers in developmental, family, health, educational, sports, industrial/organizational, ministry, and experimental psychology, as well as neuropsychology. They may also pursue licensure as clinical, counseling, or school psychologists, or marriage and family therapists. Other areas in which students seek careers include social work, marketing, law, physical therapy, and medicine. In a recent alumni survey, 85% completed postgraduate study, with two-thirds of those in a discipline-related position, and half of the alumni surveyed achieved national licensure or certification in the field. All students planning to major in psychology are urged to make an appointment at the department office (Wynn 109) and to continue visiting the department for help with progressing in the major and beyond.

PCLS 501, Advanced Child Development, 3 Units

This course is an in-depth examination of physical, cognitive, emotional, moral, and social development from infancy through adolescence. Content includes developmental theory and practice of early childhood education, as well as assessment of child development and impairments in developmental functioning.

PCLS 502, Applied Child Development and Medical Terminology, 3 Units

This course reviews psychosocial and clinical aspects of disease and injury for the hospitalized and medically fragile child. Course content includes medical terminology, charting, complementary medicine, and physiological, cognitive, social, and emotional impacts of disease and injury on the patient and family.

PCLS 511, Family Systems Theory and Applications, 3 Units

This course explores family systems and therapeutic models with a focus on family psychology. Emphasis is on family-centered care and the effects that terminal illnesses have on the family system. Course content covers parenting medically fragile children, parenting and family relationships with a seriously ill or terminal parent, diversity issues and children with special needs, therapeutic models in family psychology, and integration of Christian faith and theology with family psychology.

PCLS 512, Theories and Practices of Grief and Loss, 3 Units

Students in this course develop understanding of the family-centered care model and explore therapeutic interventions and techniques aimed at benefitting patients and families affected by death and serious illness. Course content focuses on death, grief, and bereavement and their effects on the family system. Each student learns hands-on interventions to guide patients and families through death, grief, loss, and healing.

PCLS 512L, From Grief to Healing: Strategies and Application Lab, 1 Unit

In this lab course, students apply understanding of grief theories and explore practical therapeutic interventions and approaches aimed at benefitting children and families effected by death or serious illness. Focus is on historical and current views on death, grief, bereavement, and the effects on family system. Each student learns hands-on interventions to guide children and families from grief to healing process.

Prerequisite: PCLS 521;

Corequisite: PCLS 512

PCLS 520, Infants and Toddlers: Development and Interventions, 3 Units

This course offers an in-depth exploration of the growth and development of infants and toddlers. Content includes developmental theories and developmentally appropriate interventions, as well as assessment of development and impairments in developmental functioning.

PCLS 521, Introduction to Child Life, 3 Units

This course aids students in gaining a broad understanding of the field of Child Life and equips students with the knowledge of the history and trends of the child life profession. Course content includes: Scope of practice in Child Life, the Official Child Life documents, clinical assessment, child life theoretical foundations, development and hospital stressors, and introduction to exceptional and medically challenged children.

PCLS 522, Therapeutic Interventions and Play-Based Techniques, 3 Units

This course is designed for students to develop an understanding of the history and theories of play and play-based therapies. Students gain knowledge of therapeutic play techniques, and explore research and theories on the importance of psychosocial preparation for medical procedures. Post- and preprocedural coping techniques and therapeutic interventions are taught as well. Students create hands-on interventions to prepare patients of all developmental levels for a variety of procedures.

PCLS 523, Coping Strategies for Children Experiencing Stress and Trauma, 3 Units

This course is designed for students to explore the best evidence-based practices in play therapy, with an emphasis on psychosocial and therapeutic interventions for children with special needs (cognitive intellectual and/or pervasive developmental disabilities). This course focuses on the effects traumatic situations have on the patient/client and their family. Students explore a variety of play therapy techniques and therapeutic interventions to help patients and families work through trauma and PTSD.

PCLS 524, Adolescent Development and Interventions, 3 Units

This course is an in-depth examination of the physical, cognitive, emotional, moral, and social development of adolescents. Content includes developmental theory and interventions, as well as assessment of development and impairments in developmental functioning.

PCLS 525, Assessment, Preparation, and Documentation, 3 Units

This course reviews historical and current perspectives on techniques and outcomes of preparing children for healthcare encounters and life-changing events. The emphasis is on students developing proficiency in setting goals during child life assessments to plan developmentally appropriate preparation interventions and gain competencies with documentation. This course also addresses coping strategies for pain management. Achievement of course objectives is addressed through experiential learning, lectures, readings, discussion, and reflection.

PCLS 531, Ethics, Diversity and Professional Issues, 3 Units

This course covers legal, ethical, moral, cultural, religious and gender issues within a family-centered context. Theories and concepts of culture and cultural diversity are explored. This course also examines issues related to parenting medically fragile children, including legal and ethical considerations. An integration of Christian faith and theology is implemented in the course in regards to professional ethics and multicultural competence.

PCLS 532, Child Life Administration and Leadership, 3 Units

Students gain understanding of child life program development and acquire the leadership skills to manage a child life program. Course content includes outreach and technology in the field of child life; child life administration, supervision, and mentoring; group facilitation skills; leadership skills; and program evaluation.

PCLS 541, Pre Practicum in Child Life, 3 Units

This course is designed to further develop the therapeutic tools of students prior to child life practicum placement. Students focus on developing proficiency in the core goals during crisis assessment and interventions, gain competencies in therapeutic dynamics, gain competencies in communication and listening to be applied when working with a diverse population of patients, families, and members of the multidisciplinary team. Additionally, students are encouraged to begin developing a theoretical and conceptual understanding of working with hospitalized and medically fragile children. Students are also encouraged to address issues regarding the integration of their faith with the practice of child life. These goals are addressed through experiential learning, lecture, readings, discussion, and reflection.

PCLS 542, Practicum in Child Life, 3 Units

This field experience course is taught by a certified child life specialist and is designed and evaluated according to the specific clinical and academic standards set forth by the Association of Child Life Professionals (ACLP). According to the ACLP, "The Child Life Practicum is designed as an introductory experience for individuals interested in pursuing a career in child life. Through experiential learning and observation of Certified Child Life Specialists, child life practicum students begin to increase their knowledge of basic child life skills related to play, developmental assessment, and integration of child life theory into interventions with infants, children, youth and families." All students are required to participate in weekly mentor meetings with the instructor throughout the semester.

PCLS 543, Internship in Child Life, 3 Units

This field experience course is taught by a certified child life specialist and is designed and evaluated according to the specific clinical and academic standards set forth by the Association of Child Life Professionals (formerly the Child Life Council). According to the association, "The Child Life Practicum is designed as an introductory experience for individuals interested in pursuing a career in child life. Through experiential learning and observation of Certified Child Life Specialists, child life practicum students begin to increase their knowledge of evidence-based, developmentally-appropriate interventions including therapeutic play, preparation and education that support and reduce fear, anxiety and pain for infants, children, youth and families as they cope with the stress and uncertainty of illness, injury and treatment." All students are required to participate in a weekly on-campus mentor meeting with the instructor throughout the semester.

PCLS 551, Research Methods and Statistical Analysis, 3 Units

This course surveys the major social science research methods, preparing students to read, understand, and evaluate psychological research. This course will provide students with the basic knowledge and experience of developing research proposals. Students will also learn to understand survey methods, data collection, and research analysis. This course is designed for students to identify his or her thesis topic and/or project and prepare students for PCLS 552.

PCLS 552, Thesis/Project Seminar, 3 Units

This master's thesis seminar is intended to provide students with a theoretical and methodological foundation necessary for completing their MS thesis/project in Child Life Science within the Psychology Department. The main objective of this seminar course is to help students develop and implement the theoretical foundation and methodological procedures needed to complete a MS graduate thesis or clinical project. CR/NC grading.

PCLS 599, Readings in Child Life Psychology, 1-3 Units

Students may enroll in an independent study for unit credit to investigate subjects and interests that lie beyond regular course offerings, explore topics in greater depth, and/or initiate individual projects. Such requests must be developed in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and be approved by the graduate program chair and dean. Unit credit varies depending on the scope of the study plan.

PRPS 110, General Psychology, 3 Units

This general survey course explores the field of psychology. It includes human development, social psychology, learning, perception, cognition, motivation, personality, psychological testing, and nervous system functioning. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

PRPS 250, Data Analysis in Psychology, 3 Units

This course introduces students to statistical analyses that are common in psychological research. Students learn to identify the appropriate analysis, how to run the statistical analysis in SPSS, and how to interpret SPSS output. Students are also introduced to writing results in APA style.

Prerequisite: PRMA 130

PRPS 280, Introduction to Certified Alcohol Drug Counselor Credentialing, 3 Units

Students in this course examine the effects of alcoholism and drug dependency, specifically as they relate to cultural/lifestyle considerations, human behavior, and family dynamics. Course material also considers the substance use system of care, including its programs, policies, and procedures for the treatment and recovery of individuals suffering from substance use disorders. This is the first course in a series designed to meet the educational requirements for California Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals (CCAPP) credentialing.

PRPS 290, Human Growth and Development, 3 Units

This study of human development across the life span emphasizes a multidisciplinary perspective, including such areas as psychology and sociology, processes as social interaction, and the tools for applying developmental psychology to life situations. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

PRPS 292, Introduction to Brain and Behavior, 3 Units

The purpose for this course is to provide a foundation of the physiological basis of human behavior. Topics include the structure and function of different brain regions, how neurons communicate, sensory and motor function, and complex brain functions such as speech and cognition. This course serves as an introduction to the neurobiology of various psychological and neurological diseases.

PRPS 305, Educational Psychology, 3 Units

Educational psychology is a broad field of study focusing on the various factors that influence learning and human knowledge. This course provides an overview of the principles and theories used throughout other psychological fields, but in the context of educational psychology. Specifically, this course covers development, culture, motivation, learning, cognition, and learner differences.

PRPS 320, Social Psychology, 3 Units

How are individuals' thoughts, feelings, and behaviors influenced by other people? In this course, students are encouraged to become careful observers of social influences on human behavior by learning the theories and methods employed by social psychologists in order to apply these perspectives in everyday social interactions.

PRPS 330, Sports Psychology, 3 Units

Sports psychology is a survey course that explores the role of psychology as it is related to the enhancement of athletic performance. Students will spend time on areas related to sports and physical activity such as motivation, self-confidence, goal setting, burnout, anxiety, healthy attitudes toward sports participation, and other sports-related activity. Emphasis is on critically reviewing sports psychology literature and research in an attempt to separate effective and ineffective psychology-related approaches to sport activity.

PRPS 340, History of Psychology, 3 Units

The historical growth of psychological science is surveyed here. This course focuses on major theorists and their ideas in relation to the historical context as well as current psychological issues.

PRPS 345, Psychology of Child and Adolescent Development, 3 Units

This course is an advanced examination of emotional, cognitive, physical, and social development from infancy through adolescence. The process of human development as a complex interaction of biological and sociocultural factors is reviewed. Contemporary research topics focusing on genetics, fertility, attachment, communication, and cognitive and moral aspects of development are examined. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

PRPS 355, Psychology of Adult Development, 3 Units

This course is an advanced examination of the emotional, cognitive, physical, and social development of individuals from young adulthood through the end of life. The process of adult development as an interplay of biological, psychological, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects is examined. Emphasis is on normal patterns in personal and emotional development in adulthood, as well as on contemporary research in areas of health, gender, marriage and relationships, family and parenting, ethnic/ecological systems, work, ethics, and morality.

PRPS 360, Abnormal Psychology, 3 Units

The major focus of this course is mental illness and abnormal behavior, in light of modern theory and knowledge. Current trends and modern methods of diagnosis, understanding, treatment, and prevention are discussed.

PRPS 362, Research Methods in Psychology, 3 Units

Students engage in a comprehensive overview of quantitative and qualitative research methods used in psychological research, and gain an understanding of the ethical considerations and other challenges involved in good research design. Students also complete a research project and learn to write utilizing the style adopted by the American Psychological Association.

Prerequisite: PRPS 250 and PRWR 260

PRPS 370, Industrial/Organizational Psychology, 3 Units

Students survey the basic behavioral science research and thinking as they contribute to industrial and organizational psychology, including worker attitudes and theories of motivation, organizational structure and communication, theories of leadership and decision making, conflict resolution, and methods of personnel selection and appraisal.

PRPS 375, Psychology of Conflict Management and Mediation, 3 Units

This class develops a psychological understanding of the dynamics of human conflict; the differences between constructive and destructive conflict; the different ways in which conflict can be managed, resolved and transformed, and develops the basic skills in the management and resolution of conflict.

PRPS 380, Psychology of Personality, 3 Units

Students in this course become familiar with the various basic elements of personality and their integration, exploring concepts regarding the basic components of personality and the processes that undergird an individual's growth and behavior. Course material also covers current and traditional theories of personality.

PRPS 383, Psychology of Suicide, 3 Units

This course gives students an overview of suicidal behavior, including terminology, statistics, theories, and interventions, that addresses this sensitive topic from a biopsychosocial-spiritual perspective. Students also have opportunities to learn fundamental skills in suicide assessment, safety planning, and interventions to reduce suicide.

PRPS 385, Health Psychology, 3 Units

This is a survey course exploring the role of psychology as it is related to human physiology and the health field. Topics include basic neurology, stress management, nutrition, addictive substances, immunological disorders, and other relevant psychophysiological areas.

PRPS 386, Community Psychology, 3 Units

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the field of community psychology. This area of psychology is concerned with the scientific study of social structures and their influence on individuals, groups, and organizations. The main focus will be on the development and application of community-based psychological theory and research to understanding, designing, implementing, and evaluating social change and empowerment. the roles of research and social action at multiple levels of analysis to facilitate social change will be examined.

PRPS 390, Cognition, 3 Units

An overview of cognitive psychology is provided. Theories and research concerning sensation, perception, memory, and other higher-order mental processes include imagery, language, creativity, concept formation, and decision-making are discussed.

PRPS 400, Multicultural Psychology, 3 Units

This course introduces students to cultural and multicultural psychology sub disciplines in psychology. Students develop knowledge of the history, major tenets, theories, research findings and behavioral practices in multicultural psychology. Students also gain understanding of the cultural bases for psychological processes. Students develop awareness, knowledge and skills for engaging in intercultural and multicultural contexts. Students are also asked to advance their cultural self-knowledge as well as knowledge of diverse others in order to develop multicultural competence in working with individuals from diverse backgrounds. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

PRPS 405, Psychology of Learning, 3 Units

This course examines several major theories and research in the psychology of learning, as well as how learning theories have developed historically and how learning principles apply to psychological problems.

PRPS 410, Psychology of Exceptional Children, 3 Units

Students examine and analyze the problems faced by the exceptional child. The study includes physical and emotional adjustment, speech and language disorders, various childhood disorders such as mental retardation and depression, and other childhood mental and physical disorders.

PRPS 415, Group Process, 3 Units

Students survey the basic behavioral science research and thinking as applied to human interaction in groups. This includes such topics as group formation, phases, structure, types and uses of groups, group communication, group conflict resolution, and methods of group leadership. The course includes the observation and evaluation of group interaction.

PRPS 420, Political Psychology, 3 Units

This course addresses political phenomena from a psychological perspective, and students are encouraged to develop civic knowledge, apply psychological theory within political contexts, and identify determinants of political behavior. Course content includes political attitudes and identity, leadership and group influence, voting behavior, nationalism, social movements, terrorism, and international conflict/resolution. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

PRPS 430, Intervention Strategies with Children, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to a broad range of assessment and intervention strategies designed to meet the developmental, psychomotor, language, behavioral, and education needs of children. Issues of normative and non-normative child and family functioning in child assessment and intervention planning are considered. Observational techniques, standardized tests, informal assessment measures, developmental assessments, and alternatives to current testing practices are discussed and reviewed from the multiple disciplines impacting child assessment and intervention. The broad range of modalities utilized in intervention with children is given strong emphasis with observation and student practice required at an intervention site.

PRPS 432, Psychosocial Interventions in Pediatric Health Care, 3 Units

This is a core course in the child life specialist curriculum, covering a wide range of recreational and psychosocial interventions for children who are hospitalized, chronically ill, or have disabilities. Students learn various intervention techniques using developmental play, music, art, dance, and other forms of recreation, and gain understanding of the role of the child life specialist as a member of an interdisciplinary medical team.

PRPS 440, Psychology of Religion, 3 Units

This course investigates the common ground between psychology and religion. Values, mature religion, the nature of humanity, and religious experience are all areas of study for this purpose.

PRPS 445, Psychology of the Family, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of the field of family psychology. The three primary areas of study are: family systems theory, the family lifecycle, and several theoretical frameworks for the study of families. Students are given the opportunity to apply these concepts to their own family of origin.

PRPS 450, Counseling Theory, 3 Units

This course is an introduction to counseling and psychotherapy, with students exploring the underlying assumptions and practices of traditional and contemporary counseling theories. Students also explore common ethical concerns that emerge in counseling relationships.

PRPS 451, Interventions in Counseling, 3 Units

This course introduces counseling methods and practices; legal and ethical codes of conduct for counseling professionals; community prevention, education, and early intervention methods; interviewing; screening; and interventions in counseling. Students practice basic counseling assessment and intervention methods, including crisis management and safety practices. This course meets criteria for Domain IV of the CCAPP certification requirements.

PRPS 453, Bilingualism, Biculturalism, and Cognition, 3 Units

This course provides students with an overview of issues in bilingualism and biculturalism from a cognitive perspective. Theories and research concerning knowledge representation, bilingual cognition (language acquisition, production, comprehension, and variations in executive functions), and bicultural cognition (cognitive consequences of culture-specific knowledge) are discussed. Students enrolled in this course may be required to share information regarding their personal life, family, or relationships.

PRPS 455, Field Experience, 3 Units

This course is for students who have completed most of the psychology or sociology major requirements. Each student participates in one or more endeavors that offer an opportunity to apply prior training to a professional setting while acquiring new knowledge. This course can be repeated for a total of 6 units counted toward the major and 9 units toward the degree. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

PRPS 463, Drugs, Behavior, and Society, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of drug use historically and in contemporary society from community and bio-psychosocial perspectives. It provides an in-depth study of various psychoactive drugs of abuse, including physiological, psychosocial, health, legal and political aspects of drugs. This course explores drug-taking risk behaviors and issues related to dependence among high risk populations. Strategies for drug abuse prevention/education and intervention approaches are also examined in this course.

PRPS 464, Substance Use Assessment and Interventions, 3 Units

Students in this course gain an in-depth understanding of empirically driven and theoretically grounded assessments and interventions for substance use issues, focusing on how to engage in effective screening and assessment protocols for substance use problem identification and service planning. Students participate in practical application of evidence-based interventions, including the use of case studies and a variety of practice exercises. Course material integrates foundational assessment and intervention models for addressing co-occurring mental health needs, family system issues, and patient-centeredness, including spirituality.

PRPS 466, Case Management in Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders, 3 Units

This course offers an overview of the theory, structure, and practice of case management. Students gain an understanding of the professional practice of case management, including scope and responsibilities, multidisciplinary and ecological systems engagement, cultural and diversity factors, and ethical and legal issues. Students develop skills in effective communication, clinical documentation, case management facilitation, managing interpersonal and individual dynamics, case management interviewing, intervention planning, and implementation of services.

PRPS 470, Cognitive Neuroscience, 3 Units

Cognitive neuroscience as a field studies the relationship between cognitive processes and the brain. Students will first learn about the major research methods in this field, such as lesion studies, brain imaging, and animal models. The majority of the course will then describe how these methods have been used to inform our understanding about the neural correlates of memory, decision-making, perception, and social cognition.

PRPS 472, Neurological and Behavioral Disorders, 3 Units

This course examines the neurobiology of various psychological and neurological diseases. Neurological disorders covered include developmental, tumors, seizures, strokes, traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative, and infectious disease. Behavioral disorders include schizophrenia, major affective disorders, anxiety disorders, autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, stress disorders, sleeping and eating disorders. The neurobiology of drug abuse will be analyzed based on common features of addiction, pathways affected by commonly abused drugs and heredity factors.

PRPS 475, Research Experience I, 3 Units

This course helps students improve their research skills by providing an opportunity to integrate knowledge, skills, and interests in order to conduct a comprehensive research project. Successful completion of the course results in an APA-style paper or submission of a paper or poster presentation to a professional organization or in a professional setting. Concurrent enrollment in another research practicum course is permitted. 12 units of research experience (PSYC475, 476 combined) can be counted toward the bachelor degree requirements. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

PRPS 480, Psychological Testing and Measurement, 3 Units

Students gain a thorough background in objective tests and measurements. A brief survey is offered in intelligence, personality, organization, and industrial psychological measures. Terminology is developed, dangers and advantages of psychological instruments discussed, and each student is required to administer and interpret a number of instruments. Special materials fee applies. The course is offered to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. A materials fee applies.

PRPS 485, Stress and Coping, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of stress and coping theory as it has developed in the research literature in the last century. The interrelationships between stress and mental illness, medical diseases, and industrial-organizational factors are discussed. Students develop a basic understanding of stress as it relates to trauma and post-traumatic symptomology. Students gain an understanding of basic stress management and coping techniques and their clinical applications.

PRPS 494, Professional Studies in Child Life, 3 Units

This course helps students gain a broad understanding of the field of child life and equips them with the knowledge of the history and trends of the child life profession, as required by the Association of Child Life Professionals. Course content includes: 1) Scope of practice in child life, 2) child life documents, 3) impact of illness/injury and health care on patients and families, 4) family-centered care, 5) therapeutic play, and 6) preparation. Additional topics include, but are not limited to, clinical assessment, child life theoretical foundations, development and hospital stressors, and introduction to exceptional and medically challenged children.

PRPS 495, Special Topics in Psychology, 3 Units

This course engages students in focused study of particular topics of direct relevance or urgency in the field of psychology which are not already discussed in the curriculum. Topics vary from semester to semester and may reflect new practices, theories, or faculty research interests in the field. This course may be taken more than once as topics change.

PRPS 496, Writing 3: Senior Seminar in Psychology and Christian Integration, 3 Units

Students in this course discuss and critically evaluate the core ideas in the integration of psychology and the Christian faith, exploring the 4-5 established approaches for how to integrate what is known from psychological science and what is known from biblical hermeneutics and theology. Upon completion of the course, students are able to define and communicate an awareness of the issues and various approaches for integration, as well as identify and communicate the application of the integration of psychology and the Christian faith in their own lives and practice of psychology. This writing-intensive course develops students' ability to think critically and construct complex arguments related to psychology and Christianity. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing and PRWR 260

PRPS 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed, by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

PRPS 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

PRPS 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, electronic media, or artistic creation of a material form. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

PSYC 110, General Psychology, 3 Units

This general survey course explores the field of psychology. It includes human development, social psychology, learning, perception, cognition, motivation, personality, psychological testing, and nervous system functioning. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

PSYC 110H, General Psychology - Honors, 3 Units

This general survey course explores the field of psychology. It includes human development, social psychology, learning, perception, cognition, motivation, personality, psychological testing, and nervous system functioning. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

PSYC 250, Data Analysis in Psychology, 3 Units

This course introduces students to statistical analyses that are common in psychological research. Students learn to identify the appropriate analysis, how to run the statistical analysis in SPSS, and how to interpret SPSS output. Students are also introduced to writing results in APA style.

Prerequisite: MATH 130

PSYC 280, Introduction to Certified Alcohol Drug Counselor Credentialing, 3 Units

Students in this course examine the effects of alcoholism and drug dependency, specifically as they relate to cultural/lifestyle considerations, human behavior, and family dynamics. Course material also considers the substance use system of care, including its programs, policies, and procedures for the treatment and recovery of individuals suffering from substance use disorders. This is the first course in a series designed to meet the educational requirements for California Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals (CCAPP) credentialing.

PSYC 290, Human Growth and Development, 3 Units

This study of human development across the life span emphasizes a multidisciplinary perspective, including such areas as psychology, sociology, processes as social interaction, and the tools for applying developmental psychology to life situations. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

PSYC 290H, Human Growth and Development - Honors, 3 Units

This study of human development across the life span emphasizes a multidisciplinary perspective, including such areas as psychology, sociology, processes as social interaction, and the tools for applying developmental psychology to life situations. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

PSYC 292, Introduction to Brain and Behavior, 3 Units

The purpose for this course is to provide a foundation of the physiological basis of human behavior. Topics include the structure and function of different brain regions, how neurons communicate, sensory and motor function, and complex brain functions such as speech and cognition. This course serves as an introduction to the neurobiology of various psychological and neurological diseases.

PSYC 301, Global-Local Cultural Psychology Integration I, 1 Unit

This course prepares students for their semester of study away, introducing them to the cultural, multicultural, social, and ecosystemic contexts of the local study-away culture, including the history, major cultural values, and cultural, sociopolitical, and interpersonal dynamics that inform and situate their study away. Students develop an understanding of the cultural bases for psychological processes of individuals they are likely to engage with during their time abroad, and also develop awareness, self-knowledge, and self-assessment of their skills for engaging in intercultural and multicultural contexts. Students are prepared to advance their cultural self-knowledge and knowledge of diverse others in the formation of cultural competence.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the South Africa Semester and a psychology major.

PSYC 302, Global-Local Cultural Psychology Integration II, 2 Units

This course facilitates student re-entry from a semester abroad. Students critically analyze their international study experience, synthesizing their gained awareness, knowledge of self and other, and skills in engaging with diverse others during their semester abroad. This course facilitates students translating their advanced knowledge and skills from the cross-cultural context into knowledge and skills that are effective for use in navigating their domestic multicultural context, facilitating their identity formation into ethical and responsible local citizens and emerging professionals.

Prerequisite: Students will have returned from study abroad South Africa the previous semester and are psychology majors

PSYC 305, Educational Psychology, 3 Units

Educational psychology is a broad field of study focusing on the various factors that influence learning and human knowledge. This course provides an overview of the principles and theories used throughout other psychological fields, but in the context of educational psychology. Specifically, this course covers development, culture, motivation, learning, cognition, and learner differences.

PSYC 320, Social Psychology, 3 Units

How are individuals' thoughts, feelings, and behaviors influenced by other people? In this course, students are encouraged to become careful observers of social influences on human behavior by learning the theories and methods employed by social psychologists in order to apply these perspectives in everyday social interactions.

PSYC 330, Sports Psychology, 3 Units

Sports psychology is a survey course that explores the role of psychology as it is related to the enhancement of athletic performance. Students will spend time on areas related to sports and physical activity such as motivation, self-confidence, goal setting, burnout, anxiety, healthy attitudes toward sports participation, and other sports-related activity. Emphasis is on critically reviewing sports psychology literature and research in an attempt to separate effective and ineffective psychology-related approaches to sport activity.

PSYC 340, History of Psychology, 3 Units

The historical growth of psychological science is surveyed here. This course focuses on major theorists and their ideas in relation to the historical context as well as current psychological issues.

PSYC 345, Psychology of Child and Adolescent Development, 3 Units

This course is an advanced examination of emotional, cognitive, physical, and social development from infancy through adolescence. The process of human development as a complex interaction of biological and sociocultural factors is reviewed. Contemporary research topics focusing on genetics, fertility, attachment, communication, and cognitive and moral aspects of development are examined. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

PSYC 355, Psychology of Adult Development, 3 Units

This course is an advanced examination of the emotional, cognitive, physical, and social development of individuals from young adulthood through the end of life. The process of adult development as an interplay of biological, psychological, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects is examined. Emphasis is on normal patterns in personal and emotional development in adulthood, as well as on contemporary research in areas of health, gender, marriage and relationships, family and parenting, ethnic/ecological systems, work, ethics, and morality.

PSYC 360, Abnormal Psychology, 3 Units

The major focus of this course is mental illness and abnormal behavior, in light of modern theory and knowledge. Current trends and modern methods of diagnosis, understanding, treatment, and prevention are discussed.

PSYC 362, Research Methods in Psychology, 3 Units

Students engage in a comprehensive overview of quantitative and qualitative research methods used in psychological research, and gain an understanding of the ethical considerations and other challenges involved in good research design. Students also complete a research project and learn to write utilizing the style adopted by the American Psychological Association.

Prerequisite: PSYC 250 and WRIT 260

PSYC 370, Industrial/Organizational Psychology, 3 Units

Students survey the basic behavioral science research and thinking as they contribute to industrial and organizational psychology, including worker attitudes and theories of motivation, organizational structure and communication, theories of leadership and decision making, conflict resolution, and methods of personnel selection and appraisal.

PSYC 375, Psychology of Conflict Management and Mediation, 3 Units

This class develops a psychological understanding of the dynamics of human conflict; the differences between constructive and destructive conflict; the different ways in which conflict can be managed, resolved and transformed, and develops the basic skills in the management and resolution of conflict.

PSYC 380, Psychology of Personality, 3 Units

Students in this course become familiar with the various basic elements of personality and their integration, exploring concepts regarding the basic components of personality and the processes that undergird an individual's growth and behavior. Course material also covers current and traditional theories of personality.

PSYC 380H, Psychology of Personality - Honors, 3 Units

This course acquaints students with the various basic elements of personality and their integration. Students explore concepts regarding the basic components of personality and the processes that undergird an individual's growth and behavior. The course also reviews current and traditional theories of personality.

Prerequisite: PSYC 110 and PSYC 290 or SOCW 310 + SOCW 311. Must also be a student admitted to the Honors College and be considered a member in "active" status.

PSYC 383, Psychology of Suicide, 3 Units

This course gives students an overview of suicidal behavior, including terminology, statistics, theories, and interventions, that addresses this sensitive topic from a biopsychosocial-spiritual perspective. Students also have opportunities to learn fundamental skills in suicide assessment, safety planning, and interventions to reduce suicide.

PSYC 385, Health Psychology, 3 Units

This is a survey course exploring the role of psychology as it is related to human physiology and the health field. Topics include basic neurology, stress management, nutrition, addictive substances, immunological disorders, and other relevant psychophysiological areas.

PSYC 386, Community Psychology, 3 Units

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the field of community psychology. This area of psychology is concerned with the scientific study of social structures and their influence on individuals, groups, and organizations. The main focus will be on the development and application of community-based psychological theory and research to understanding, designing, implementing, and evaluating social change and empowerment. the roles of research and social action at multiple levels of analysis to facilitate social change will be examined. May be repeated up to 6 units.

PSYC 390, Cognition, 3 Units

An overview of cognitive psychology is provided. Theories and research concerning sensation, perception, memory, and other higher-order mental processes include imagery, language, creativity, concept formation, and decision-making are discussed.

PSYC 400, Multicultural Psychology, 3 Units

This course introduces students to cultural and multicultural psychology sub disciplines in psychology. Students develop knowledge of the history, major tenets, theories, research findings and behavioral practices in multicultural psychology. Students also gain understanding of the cultural bases for psychological processes. Students develop awareness, knowledge and skills for engaging in intercultural and multicultural contexts. Students are also asked to advance their cultural self-knowledge as well as knowledge of diverse others in order to develop multicultural competence in working with individuals from diverse backgrounds. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

PSYC 400H, Cultural Psychology- Honors, 3 Units

This course presents major psychological theories and practices from a multicultural perspective, emphasizing shared components across cultures. A historical overview of different minority groups in the United States and how these people groups have adjusted and adapted to new cultures is presented. Students explore major psychological theories and practices from a multicultural perspective, with an emphasis on the cultural sources of diversity in thinking, emotion, motivation, self, development, and psychopathology. This course is designed to help individuals begin to understand the need for issues of being culturally competent in working with individuals from diverse backgrounds. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 110. Must be an Honors Program student or non-honors student with a GPA > 3.4

PSYC 405, Psychology of Learning, 3 Units

This course examines several major theories and research in the psychology of learning, as well as how learning theories have developed historically and how learning principles apply to psychological problems.

PSYC 410, Psychology of Exceptional Children, 3 Units

Students in this course examine and analyze the problems faced by the exceptional child. Course material covers physical and emotional adjustment, speech and language disorders, as well as other physical and mental disorders.

PSYC 415, Group Process, 3 Units

Students survey the basic behavioral science research and thinking as applied to human interaction in groups. This includes such topics as group formation, phases, structure, types and uses of groups, group communication, group conflict resolution, and methods of group leadership. The course includes the observation and evaluation of group interaction.

PSYC 420, Political Psychology, 3 Units

This course addresses political phenomena from a psychological perspective, and students are encouraged to develop civic knowledge, apply psychological theory within political contexts, and identify determinants of political behavior. Course content includes political attitudes and identity, leadership and group influence, voting behavior, nationalism, social movements, terrorism, and international conflict/resolution. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

PSYC 430, Intervention Strategies with Children, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to a broad range of assessment and intervention strategies designed to meet the developmental, psychomotor, language, behavioral, and education needs of children. Issues of normative and non-normative child and family functioning in child assessment and intervention planning are considered. Observational techniques, standardized tests, informal assessment measures, developmental assessments, and alternatives to current testing practices are discussed and reviewed from the multiple disciplines impacting child assessment and intervention. The broad range of modalities utilized in intervention with children is given strong emphasis with observation and student practice required at an intervention site.

PSYC 432, Psychosocial Interventions in Pediatric Health Care, 3 Units

This is a core course in the child life specialist curriculum, covering a wide range of recreational and psychosocial interventions for children who are hospitalized, chronically ill, or have disabilities. Students learn various intervention techniques using developmental play, music, art, dance, and other forms of recreation, and gain understanding of the role of the child life specialist as a member of an interdisciplinary medical team.

PSYC 440, Psychology of Religion, 3 Units

This course investigates the common ground between psychology and religion. Values, mature religion, the nature of humanity, and religious experience are all areas of study for this purpose.

PSYC 445, Psychology of the Family, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of the field of family psychology. The three primary areas of study are: family systems theory, the family lifecycle, and several theoretical frameworks for the study of families. Students are given the opportunity to apply these concepts to their own family of origin.

PSYC 450, Counseling Theory, 3 Units

This course is an introduction to counseling and psychotherapy, with students exploring the underlying assumptions and practices of traditional and contemporary counseling theories. Students also explore common ethical concerns that emerge in counseling relationships.

PSYC 451, Interventions in Counseling, 3 Units

This course introduces counseling methods and practices; legal and ethical codes of conduct for counseling professionals; community prevention, education, and early intervention methods; interviewing; screening; and interventions in counseling. Students practice basic counseling assessment and intervention methods, including crisis management and safety practices. This course meets criteria for Domain IV of the CCAPP certification requirements.

PSYC 453, Bilingualism, Biculturalism, and Cognition, 3 Units

This course provides students with an overview of issues in bilingualism and biculturalism from a cognitive perspective. Theories and research concerning knowledge representation, bilingual cognition (language acquisition, production, comprehension, and variations in executive functions), and bicultural cognition (cognitive consequences of culture-specific knowledge) are discussed. Students enrolled in this course may be required to share information regarding their personal life, family, or relationships.

PSYC 454, Counseling in the Christian Community, 3 Units

Students in this course explore the practice of counseling in Christian and ministry settings, engaging in an interdisciplinary examination of the psychological, cultural, theological, and biblical understandings of mental health care and counseling. Course material also incorporates a survey of counseling theory and practices from an integrative perspective, with attention given to ministry and Christian culture and tradition-based issues.

PSYC 455, Field Experience, 3 Units

This course is for students who have completed most of the psychology or sociology major requirements. Each student participates in one or more endeavors that offer an opportunity to apply former training in a professional setting while acquiring new knowledge, and students may be required to share information regarding their personal life, family, or relationships. This course can be repeated to a total of 6 units counted toward the major, 9 units toward the degree. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

PSYC 462, Research Methods II, 3 Units

The course is designed to further develop students' understanding of research design and the research process in the behavioral sciences. Students investigate at an advanced level the validity threats inherent in the research process and explore a variety of advanced research designs. Students have the opportunity to utilize various designs in their own research endeavors and learn to use SPSS for the analysis of their own research endeavors and data.

PSYC 463, Drugs, Behavior, and Society, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of drug use historically and in contemporary society from community and biopsychosocial perspectives. It provides an in-depth study of various psychoactive drugs of abuse, considering the physiological, psychosocial, health, legal, and political aspects of drugs. This course explores drug-taking risk behaviors and issues related to dependence among high-risk populations. Strategies for drug abuse prevention/education and intervention approaches are also examined.

PSYC 464, Substance Use Assessment and Interventions, 3 Units

Students in this course gain an in-depth understanding of empirically driven and theoretically grounded assessments and interventions for substance use issues, focusing on how to engage in effective screening and assessment protocols for substance use problem identification and service planning. Students participate in practical application of evidence-based interventions, including the use of case studies and a variety of practice exercises. Course material integrates foundational assessment and intervention models for addressing co-occurring mental health needs, family system issues, and patient-centeredness, including spirituality.

PSYC 466, Case Management in Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders, 3 Units

This course offers an overview of the theory, structure, and practice of case management. Students gain an understanding of the professional practice of case management, including scope and responsibilities, multidisciplinary and ecological systems engagement, cultural and diversity factors, and ethical and legal issues. Students develop skills in effective communication, clinical documentation, case management facilitation, managing interpersonal and individual dynamics, case management interviewing, intervention planning, and implementation of services.

PSYC 470, Cognitive Neuroscience, 3 Units

Cognitive neuroscience is the study of the relationship between cognitive processes and the brain. Students first learn about the major research methods in this field, such as lesion studies, brain imaging, and animal models, then learn how these methods have been used to inform our understanding of the neural correlates of memory, decision making, perception, and social cognition.

PSYC 472, Neurological and Behavioral Disorders, 3 Units

This course examines the neurobiology of various psychological and neurological diseases. Neurological disorders covered include developmental, tumors, seizures, strokes, traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative, and infectious disease. Behavioral disorders include schizophrenia, major affective disorders, anxiety disorders, autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, stress disorders, sleeping and eating disorders. The neurobiology of drug abuse will be analyzed based on common features of addiction, pathways affected by commonly abused drugs and heredity factors.

PSYC 475, Research Experience, 3 Units

This course helps students improve their research skills by providing an opportunity to integrate knowledge, skills, and interests while conducting a comprehensive research project. Successful completion of the course results in an APA-style paper or submission of a paper or poster presentation to a professional organization or in a professional setting. Concurrent enrollment in another research practicum course is permitted. Twelve (12) units of research experience (PSYC 475) can be counted toward the bachelor's degree requirements. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

PSYC 480, Psychological Testing and Measurement, 3 Units

Students in this course gain a thorough background in objective tests and measurements. A brief survey is offered in intelligence, personality, organization, and industrial psychological measures. Terminology is explored, the dangers and advantages of psychological instruments are discussed, and each student is required to administer and interpret a number of instruments.

PSYC 485, Stress and Coping, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of stress and coping theory as it has developed in the research literature in the last century. The interrelationships between stress and mental illness, medical diseases, and industrial-organizational factors are discussed. Students develop a basic understanding of stress as it relates to trauma and post-traumatic symptomology. Students gain an understanding of basic stress management and coping techniques and their clinical applications.

PSYC 494, Professional Studies in Child Life, 3 Units

This course helps students gain a broad understanding of the field of child life and equips them with the knowledge of the history and trends of the child life profession, as required by the Association of Child Life Professionals. Course content includes: 1) Scope of practice in child life, 2) child life documents, 3) impact of illness/injury and health care on patients and families, 4) family-centered care, 5) therapeutic play, and 6) preparation. Additional topics include, but are not limited to, clinical assessment, child life theoretical foundations, development and hospital stressors, and introduction to exceptional and medically challenged children.

PSYC 495, Special Topics in Psychology, 3 Units

This course engages students in focused study of particular topics of direct relevance or urgency in the field of psychology which are not already discussed in the curriculum. Topics vary from semester to semester and may reflect new practices, theories, or faculty research interests in the field. This course may be taken more than once as topics change.

PSYC 496, Writing 3: Senior Seminar in Psychology and Christian Integration, 3 Units

Students in this course discuss and critically evaluate the core ideas in the integration of psychology and the Christian faith, exploring the 4-5 established approaches for how to integrate what is known from psychological science and what is known from biblical hermeneutics and theology. Upon completion of the course, students are able to define and communicate an awareness of the issues and various approaches for integration, as well as identify and communicate the application of the integration of psychology and the Christian faith in their own lives and practice of psychology. This writing-intensive course develops students' ability to think critically and construct complex arguments related to psychology and Christianity. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and WRIT 260.

PSYC 496H, Senior Seminar: Psychology and Christian Integration - Honors, 3 Units

This class discusses and critically evaluates the core ideas in the integration of psychology and the Christian faith by teaching the four to five established approaches for how to integrate what is known from psychological science and what is known from Biblical hermeneutics and theology. Upon completion of the course, students are able to define and communicate an awareness of the issues and various approaches for integration. Students are also able to identify and communicate the application of the integration of psychology and the Christian faith in their own lives and practice of psychology.

Prerequisite: Senior standing, PSYC 110, completion of the UDWI req (PSYC 362), and completion of the units required for God's Word and the Christian Response. Must be a student admitted to the Honors Collegeand be considered a member in "active" status

PSYC 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This course offers a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent-study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this course.

PSYC 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique and gives students experience in the research process. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent-study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

PSYC 498H, Directed Research- Honors, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The one-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than one unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Honors College, PSYC 110, and Junior or Senior standing

PSYC 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, electronic media, or artistic creation of a material form. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

PSYC 501, Theory, Research and Practice in Psychology, 3 Units

This course provides an intensive review of major historical and contemporary theories, research and practice approaches in the field of psychology. Emphasis is on examining the key questions, proposed models, methods, findings, ideological controversies, and issues within the field of psychology. The course covers the various grand and emergent theories to foster dialogue that evaluates the science across psychological sub-disciplines, spanning: general principles of human development, neurological bases of behavior, cognitive functioning, systemic socio-cultural factors, and individual health differences. Students engage in theoretical analyses of current trends in basic and applied theory, research, and practices of psychology across various sub-disciplines, as well as how individuals function with consideration of a Christian worldview.

Prerequisite: Must be first year student in the Master of Science in Research Psychology and Data Analysis program or instructor approval.

PSYC 511, Experimental Research Methods, 3 Units

This course will build on your knowledge of the information learned in your undergraduate research methods course with an emphasis on experimental methodology. This course will cover a variety of topics including the basics of conducting experimental designs, ethical guidelines for conducting experimental psychological research, validity issues associated with different experimental research designs, and various methods of both collecting and analyzing data, including psychometric issues associated with different psychological measures. This will be accomplished by combining traditional lectures with application of principles through application and demonstration.

PSYC 512, Non-Experimental Research Methods, 3 Units

This course provides an in-depth study of how to plan, conduct, and analyze studies that use non-experimental research designs, including correlational, survey, and qualitative methods. This course encourages students to identify core areas of descriptive psychological research and begin building a strong research concept about those areas-especially in regard to the application of non-experimental observational research designs.

PSYC 517, Program Evaluation, 3 Units

This course provides students with foundational knowledge and skills in the basic methods of evaluation research. Course topics include common methods of evaluation, including systematic needs assessments, formative research, program performance, and outcome effectiveness, using mixed-methods research approaches. Students also engage in discussions about ethical considerations and other challenges involved in good evaluation design and methods. Through class lectures, reading, and interactive skill-building applications, students apply course material in group and individual assignments.

Prerequisite: PSYC 511, PSYC 512

PSYC 518, Analysis of Variance, 3 Units

Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is a common statistical technique used by research psychologists to analyze differences in their data. This course focuses on introductory and advanced ANOVA methods and ANOVA's relation to psychological research; advanced ANOVA methods covered in this course include repeated measure, mixed design, ANCOVA, and MANOVA. Students learn to implement these methods, analyze findings, and report the findings for APA-style journal publications. Use of multiple popular statistical software programs is emphasized.

Prerequisite: MATH 110 or equivalent;

Corequisite: PSYC 518L

PSYC 518L, Analysis of Variance Lab, 1 Unit

In this course, the lab component to PSYC 518, students apply the statistical analysis knowledge from PSYC 518 to computational procedures using popular social science statistical software. Additionally, this course can be used to fulfill requirements for the JMP/SAS certification.

Corequisite: PSYC 518

PSYC 519, Regression, 3 Units

This advanced statistics course covers introductory and advanced regression analyses utilized throughout psychological research. Some of the topics covered are correlation, multiple regression, hierarchical regression, mediation/moderation, and logistic regression. Students learn to identify the appropriate regression analysis for different types of research questions, practice interpreting the results of the analyses in popular statistical software, and learn how to clearly report regression findings for APA-style journal publications. Use of multiple popular statistical software programs is emphasized.

Prerequisite: B- or better in PSYC 518;

Corequisite: PSYC 519L

PSYC 519L, Regression Lab, 1 Unit

This is the lab component to PSYC 519. In this lab course, students apply the statistical analysis knowledge from PSYC 519 to computational procedures using popular social science statistical software. Additionally, this course can be used to fulfill requirements for the JMP/SAS certification.

Corequisite: PSYC 519

PSYC 520, Psychometrics: Assessment and Measurement, 3 Units

Students in this course learn to apply classical and modern psychometric theories to develop and validate psychological tests and scales for data collection. Some of the topics included are instrument construction, reliability, validity, factor analysis, and item response theory. Students gain hands-on experience in developing a psychological instrument and analyzing the psychometric properties of previously created scales. Use of multiple popular statistical software programs is emphasized.

Prerequisite: B- or better in PSYC 518;

Corequisite: PSYC 520L

PSYC 520L, Psychometrics: Assessment and Measurement Lab, 1 Unit

This is the lab component to PSYC 520. In this lab course, students apply the statistical analysis knowledge from PSYC 520 to computational procedures using popular social science statistical software. Additionally, this course can be used to fulfill requirements for the JMP/SAS certification.

Corequisite: PSYC 520

PSYC 521, Faith Integration and Research Seminar, 3 Units

This course explores the nature of integrating psychology and religion/faith. It considers the functions and skills, as well as the theoretical modes of thought necessary for understanding the relationship between psychological research and religion. Focus is placed on the skills of research, constructive dialogue and writing. The course is intended to provide students with resources for developing their own approach to integration while also helping students clarify their own faith, morals and values that intersect with psychological research.

PSYC 522, Seminar in Ethical, Professional, and Diversity Issues, 3 Units

This course introduces students to research and professional issues in psychology, with an emphasis on ethics and diversity. Students will learn to recognize the importance of ethical behavior in all aspects of science as well as how sociocultural factors and personal biases may shape the practice of psychology. Emphasis is given to the integration of the student's spiritual and sociocultural philosophy with professional ethics. Historical and contemporary issues in basic and applied psychological research and interventions are reviewed.

PSYC 523, Interventions for Trauma and Crisis, 3 Units

This course helps students understand the neurobiological, cognitive, and emotional dynamics that underlie trauma-related mental health disorders. Students identify and apply effective interventions for the treatment of children and adolescents impacted by trauma, grief, and/or crisis, as well as the common co-occurring behavioral concerns. This course prepares students to effectively select appropriate evidence-based counseling interventions with diverse children and youth. The contextual dynamics of crises and trauma, family, social environments, and multicultural issues are addressed.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 524, Counseling Adolescents, 3 Units

This course helps students understand the broad range of adolescent problems and disorders. A variety of psychotherapeutic modalities is presented, providing students an opportunity to develop basic adolescent-therapy skills and effective treatment strategies. The impact of development, family dynamics, social environments, and multicultural issues is addressed, and legal and ethical issues unique to adolescent populations are considered.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 525, Principles and Practice of Assessment and Evaluation, 3 Units

Students in this course gain a broad understanding of the clinical use of psychological tests, assessment, and evaluation in the treatment of emotional, behavioral, and mental health concerns within the context of human diversity and social contexts and systems. Emphasis is on understanding the reliability, validity, and utility of psychological testing, developing skills in administering and interpreting appropriate assessment measures, and utilizing findings in treatment planning and report writing. Particular attention is given to the assessment of children and youth and to diversity issues, and the course meets BBS requirements for spousal or partner abuse assessment, detection, and intervention strategies; same-gender-abuse dynamics; and suicide risk assessment and intervention.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527

PSYC 526, Multicultural Counseling, 3 Units

Students in this course learn multicultural counseling theories and techniques as they explore the counselor's role in developing cultural self-awareness, identity development, and promoting cultural social justice. Individual and community strategies for working with and advocating for diverse populations, and eliminating biases and intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination, are discussed. Students develop an understanding of the effects of socioeconomic status on treatment and available resources, as well as cultural competency and sensitivity, and are introduced to the racial, cultural, linguistic, and ethnic backgrounds of people living in California.

PSYC 527, Diagnosis and Treatment Planning, 3 Units

This course helps students understand the role and categories of psychopathology utilized in the assessment and treatment of individuals broadly and with an emphasis on children and adolescents. Students develop their diagnostic and analytical skills through a mastery of the concepts in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Special consideration is given to co-occurring and comorbid disorders that are common in substance users and among children and youth. This course also introduces the basics of treatment planning, including diagnostic conceptualization, ecosystemic assessment, and the formulation of treatment goals and intervention strategies. Diversity issues in diagnosis and treatment planning are also considered.

PSYC 528, Treatment of Substance Use Disorders in Youth and Families, 3 Units

This course prepares students to engage in counseling practices related to substance abuse recovery, addiction, and co-occurring disorders. Students learn the major approaches to identification, evaluation, treatment, and prevention of substance abuse and addiction, the legal and medical aspects of substance abuse, what populations are at risk, and the role of case management, including the involvement of support people and support systems and the utilization of community resources. Issues of substance use are considered within diverse communities and family dynamics.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 529, Group Counseling, 3 Units

This course helps students understand group counseling theories and techniques, including principles of group dynamics, group process components, group developmental stage theories, therapeutic factors of group work, group leadership styles and approaches, pertinent research and literature, group counseling methods, and evaluation of effectiveness. Students consider group counseling children and youth from a variety of clinical, cultural, community/milieu, and developmental contexts. Identifying, planning, and implementing best practices in group counseling is addressed.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 530, Evidence-Based Practices in the Treatment of Children and Youth, 3 Units

This course helps students understand the importance of utilizing evidence-based interventions and techniques that are consistent with current professional research and practice with children and adolescents. Evidence-based practice in psychology is the integration of the best available research with clinical expertise in the context of patient characteristics, culture, and preferences. This course prepares students to effectively select appropriate evidence-based counseling interventions with diverse children and youth, as a variety of psychotherapeutic intervention strategies are presented. The contextual dynamics of development, family, social environments, and multicultural issues are addressed.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 531, Ethics and Professional Issues, 3 Units

This course helps students understand professional, ethical, and legal issues in counseling and psychotherapy from ACA and APA professional lenses. Students are introduced to California laws and regulations governing the practice of counseling and licensing as a professional clinical counselor. Students learn to navigate common ethical and legal situations that arise in counseling generally, as well as those that emerge when counseling children and youth specifically. Clinical case management, professionalism, and professional self-care are also considered.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 532, Theories of Counseling and Therapy, 3 Units

This course helps students understand the broad range of counseling and psychotherapeutic theories and techniques that are consistent with current professional research and practice. Students learn to effectively engage counseling processes in a multicultural society, select appropriate counseling interventions, develop a personal model of counseling, effectively respond to crises, and promote human wellness and the prevention of emotional and behavioral disorders. A variety of psychotherapeutic modalities is presented. The contextual dynamics of development, family, social environments, and multicultural issues are addressed.

PSYC 533, Externalizing and Dysregulation Disorders, 3 Units

This course helps students understand the neurodevelopmental basis of behavioral dysregulation, deficits of executive functioning, common comorbid disorders with neurodevelopmental issues, mental health disorders characterized by externalizing behavior, and disorders with primary behavioral symptoms. Students learn to identify and apply effective and appropriate evidence-based counseling interventions for the treatment of diverse children and adolescents with behavioral disorders. Various psychotherapeutic intervention strategies are presented, and the contextual dynamics of development, family, social environments, and multicultural issues are addressed.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 534, Family Systems Theory and Counseling, 3 Units

This course is an overview of current theories and methods of family therapy interventions, with an emphasis on how family therapy integrates diversity issues (e.g., ethnicity, socioeconomic status, spirituality, blended families) during the clinical hour. Coursework explores the major theories, their founding clinicians, and some of their contemporaries, and emphasizes clinical application of material through working with families with children and youth.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 535, Therapies for Attachment and Internalizing Disorders, 3 Units

This course helps students understand the developmental relational, social, and emotional dynamics that underlie internalizing mental health disorders. Students identify and apply effective interventions for the treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety, depressive, and attachment disorders, as well as the common co-occurring behavioral concerns. This course prepares students to effectively select appropriate evidence-based counseling interventions with diverse children and youth. Various psychotherapeutic intervention strategies are presented. The contextual dynamics of development, family, social environments, and multicultural issues are addressed.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 536, Play-Based Therapies, 3 Units

Students in this course learn the principles and practices of play therapy, and are prepared to effectively engage in developmentally and clinically appropriate play-based counseling with children, select appropriate interventions, develop a personal model of play therapy, and effectively respond to a variety of clinical concerns utilizing play-based assessment and treatments.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 542, Practicum I, 3 Units

This course gives counseling psychology graduate students an initial clinical counseling experience, requiring them to verify 140 hours of face-to-face clinical experience counseling individuals, families, or groups under the supervision of on-campus faculty and BBS-qualified site supervisors. This course provides oversight and consultation for students' clinical placement, and further development of clinical skills, focusing on management of crisis issues, legal/ethical practice, diagnosis, prognosis, multicultural treatment, treatment planning, application of theory to actual clients, integration, and case management services. Clinical work is discussed from public mental health and private practice perspectives. Students must be serving at an APU-approved training site to be enrolled in this course.

Prerequisite: Program director permission

PSYC 543, Practicum II, 3 Units

As the final evaluative component of the M.S. in Counseling Psychology program, this course includes a capstone clinical project in which students formally present a clinical case including the following elements: case assessment and conceptualization, treatment plan and process, evidence-based support for treatment strategy, and outcomes and prognosis based on identified factors related to risk and resilience as specified by the literature base. This course also requires students to verify 140 hours of face-to-face clinical experience counseling individuals, families, or groups under the supervision of on-campus faculty and Board of Behavioral Sciences-qualified site supervisors, who also offer students consultation and the further development of clinical skills. Course emphases include management of crisis issues, legal/ethical practice, diagnosis, prognosis, multicultural treatment, treatment planning, application of theory to actual clients, integration, and case management services. Clinical work is discussed from public mental health and private practice perspectives.

Prerequisite: PSYC 542

PSYC 551, Research Methods in Counseling, 3 Units

Students in this course survey the major social science research and statistical methods used in conducting research, needs assessments, and program evaluation. Course material equips students to read, understand, and evaluate psychological research, and prepares them to use research to inform evidence-based practice and understand the importance of research in advancing the profession of counseling.

PSYC 555, Career Development, 3 Units

This course helps students understand the role of the professional counselor in facilitating career planning and development of youth and emerging adults. Students explore occupational and career education trends and career counseling theories and practices that promote equity and diversity. This course prepares students to facilitate individual education and career planning and implementation of plans. Students explore the relationship between general well-being, mental health, and education and career trajectories. Career counseling needs of special populations (e.g., mid- and late-life career changes, persons with disabilities) and at-risk populations are addressed.

Prerequisite: PSYC 527, PSYC 532, and PSYC 558

PSYC 558, Advanced Developmental Psychology, 3 Units

This course helps students understand human growth and development across the lifespan, including normal and abnormal behavior, developmental crises, disability, psychopathology, and situational and environmental factors that affect normal and abnormal behavior. Students consider the impact of socioeconomic status and other contextual issues affecting social position and development, and explore the assessment and treatment of clinical concerns related to human sexuality and domestic violence across the lifespan and among diverse populations. Students also complete their Board of Behavioral Sciences-required study of aging and long-term care in this course.

PSYC 578, Research Practicum, 1-3 Units

This course gives students the opportunity to apply their research and statistical skills in a professional research setting at a practicum site. These skills include, but are not limited to, data cleaning, data analysis, research preparation, and report writing.

Prerequisite: PSYC 518 and PSYC 518L

PSYC 585, Psychopharmacology and Psychobiology, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the biological and neurological bases of human behavior, and to psychotropic medications as an adjunct to psychotherapy. Current information on the use of medications in the treatment of psychological disorders is provided, and consideration is given to the special needs of certain populations (e.g., the elderly and substance abuse patients) when prescribing psychotropic medications. Students develop skills in case management by gaining an understanding of psychotropic medication indications, dosage scheduling, effects, and side effects as part of the therapeutic practice.

PSYC 588, Research Internship, 3 Units

Students in this course obtain an internship in which they apply knowledge acquired during their master's program, helping them develop their skills in the field of research and/or data analytics. All internship sites must be preapproved and satisfy the learning outcomes of this course.

Prerequisite: 6 units of PSYC 578

PSYC 595, Special Topics, 3 Units

This course engages students in focused study of particular topics of direct relevance or urgency in the field of psychology which are not already discussed in the curriculum. Topics vary from semester to semester and may reflect new practices, theories, or faculty research interests in the field. This course may be taken more than once as topics change.

PSYC 597, Introduction to Grant and Professional Writing, 3 Units

This seminar course helps students develop and implement the theoretical foundation and methodological procedures needed to complete a Master of Science thesis in the Department of Psychology by the end of the academic year. This course guides students through the planning and execution of a master's thesis, including topic selection/refinement, thesis planning, training in the responsible conduct in research and human subjects regulatory protocols, grant funding for student research, thesis-driven data collection, data analysis, and writeup/dissemination in an organized, coherent form. The course also helps students develop their theses into scholarly presentations and manuscripts suitable for publication. A thesis is completed when the student has successfully defended it to a two-person committee comprising the thesis faculty advisor and one full-time faculty second reader.

PSYC 598, Thesis Seminar, 1-3 Units

The main objective of this seminar course is to help students develop and implement the theoretical foundation and methodological procedures needed to complete a master's thesis in the Department of Psychology by the end of the academic year.

PSYC 599, Independent Study: Psychology Research, 1-6 Units

This course provides instruction in research and gives students experience in research processes related to their area of study. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Faculty

Department Chair

Kathryn Ecklund, Ph.D.

Chair Emeritus

Brian Eck, Ph.D.

Professors

Rachel Castaneda, Ph.D.

Brian Eck, Ph.D.

Kathryn Ecklund, Ph.D.

Stephen S. Lambert, Psy.D.

Alan Oda, Ph.D.

Chong Ho (Alex) Yu, Ph.D.

Associate Professors

Brian Collisson, Ph.D.

Carissa Dwiwardani, Ph.D.

Matthew Heller, Ph.D.

Holly Holloway-Friesen, Ph.D.

Curtis Lehmann, Ph.D.

William Whitney, Ph.D.

Scott J. Wood, Ph.D.

Assistant Professors

Tanya Barclay, M.S., CCLS

L. Paul Bernard, M.A.

Julianne Edwards, Ph.D.

Carissa Howard, M.S., CCLS

Marc Kinon, Ph.D.

Hannah Knott, M.S., CCLS

Danielle Lascano, Ed.D.

Robert Linsalato, M.A.

Alessandra Macbeth, M.A.

Andrew Shelton, Ph.D.

Irene C. Valdovinos, MPH

Charity Vasquez, M.S., CCLS

Kristen Watkins

Crystal Wigglesworth, M.S., CCLS

Adjunct Faculty

Harmony Jackson, M.S., CCLS