Department of Physical Therapy

Azusa Pacific University’s Department of Physical Therapy contributes to the growing physical therapy industry by offering programs that prepare mature, self-directed, patient-oriented professionals.

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Learn more about the Department of Physical Therapy.

PT 502, Professional Relationships, 2 Units

(30 contact hours) This course introduces the role of the physical therapist as a professional health educator. Emphasis is on developing interpersonal and communication skills in relation to the interaction between therapist and patient, other health professionals, and within groups.

PT 506, Seminar I, 2 Units

(30 contact hours) This course introduces the student to the physical therapy profession. Historical and legal issues, as well as practice settings and health care trends are addressed. Emphasis is placed on professional development and responsibility of the physical therapist as a lifelong learner.

PT 558, Research Methods in Physical Therapy, 3 Units

This course introduces the student to the concepts of Physical Therapy research. A survey of major research methods is conducted and statistical methods are examined.

PT 572, Pharmacology, 3 Units

This is an introduction to pharmacology which includes pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Emphasis is on drugs commonly encountered during rehabilitation. Side effects that alter physical performance and drug effects influenced by exercise are studied.

PT 701, Human Anatomy, 8 Units

This is a 16-week intensive course in clinically oriented human anatomy from a regional approach. Microscopic and gross human anatomy are explored utilizing lectures, classroom demonstrations, human cadaver dissections, dissection videos, and hands-on functional demonstrations. Biomechanics are studied from functional and clinical approaches. Emphasis is on histology, head, neck, upper extremity, and thorax during the first half of the term; emphasis in the second half is on the spine, pelvis, lower extremity, spinal cord, and internal organs.

Corequisite: PT 702

PT 702, Clinical Skills I, 6 Units

First in a series of courses designed to examine basic evaluation and clinical skills of the physical therapist, this course focuses on objective techniques of assessment for the upper and lower extremity and spine through measurement of range of motion (ROM), muscle testing (MMT), general neurological screening, and palpation. Kinesiology of all joints is studied from functional and clinical approaches, concluding in the assessment of normal gait mechanics. An introduction to body mechanics and documentation is provided to prepare the student for safe clinical practice. Learning takes place through laboratory activities, homework, online videos, and practical examination using a problem-solving approach.

PT 703, Clinical Neuroscience, 6 Units

This course covers in depth the anatomy and physiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems and neuromuscular function, serving as a foundation for PT 704. It includes correlation of pathology with neurological symptoms and diagnostic tests.

PT 704, Neurorehabilitation, 8 Units

This course focuses on developing skills used for differential diagnosis, functional evaluation, treatment theory, and management of neurologically impaired adults. Students examine the neurophysiologic rationale for treatment approaches commonly used in physical therapy for neurologically impaired patients. Emphasis is placed on integration and development of hands-on skills in a laboratory setting. Major areas investigated include spinal cord injury, stroke, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, polyneuropathies, and common degenerative diseases.

PT 705, Orthopedics I, 8 Units

This course emphasizes the general principles and methodology of rehabilitation of orthopedic patients. Examination of the spine and lower quarter is emphasized. Mobilization, therapeutic exercise programs, and complete evaluation, treatment, and documentation are addressed specifically per diagnosis.

PT 711, Wellness, 3 Units

This course focuses on the promotion of optimal health, and disease and injury prevention, in the general adult and pediatric populations. It addresses screening techniques and risk assessment, as well as tests and measures related to aerobic capacity, balance, flexibility, strength and endurance, and posture. Findings are applied to exercise prescription.

PT 724, PT Clinical Skills II, 3 Units

(60 contact hours) This is the second in a series of clinical skills courses and discusses the visual and electromagnetic spectrum instrumentation for the treatment of dysfunction. The focus is on physical agents in relation to treatment.

PT 726, PT Clinical Skills III, 2 Units

This clinical skills laboratory course involves 45 contact hours and introduces students to assistive devices, bed mobility, and transfer training. Students perform measurement, selection, and adaptation of assistive devices, and implement bed mobility and transfer training based on patient diagnosis and need. Emphasis is on patient safety with handling, as well as body mechanics and safety of the therapist. Information is reiterated with laboratory activities, case studies, and a practical and written examination using a problem-solving approach.

PT 742, Prosthetics and Orthotics, 2 Units

(60 contact hours) This course provides foundational knowledge of the types, uses, and fitting of prosthetic and orthotic devices. Rehabilitation intervention is addressed in regard to functional use, measurements, care, adjustments, precautions, and patient education for the appropriate device. Case studies, literature review, lecture, problem-solving models, videos, and laboratory practice are used.

PT 744, Professional Ethics, 2 Units

Students in this course examine the major ethical issues issues affecting physical therapists and the healthcare profession. It involves an exploration of ethical decision making through examination of moral development, ethical theories and worldviews with specific instruction in ethical problem solving, application of the physical therapy code of ethics, as well as analysis of ethical dilemmas and case studies. Through class and small group discussions the student will examine his/her own moral values, be able to identify ethical problems and dilemmas and effectively evaluate and determine a moral course of action. It will include the ethical obligation for patient and professional advocacy as well as guidelines in spiritual care.

PT 748, Orthopedics II, 4 Units

This course emphasizes the general principles and methodology of rehabilitation of orthopedic patients. Examination of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, and temporomandibular joint is emphasized. Mobilization, therapeutic exercise programs, complete evaluation, disease processes, and documentation are addressed specifically per diagnosis.

PT 750, Comprehensive Exams, 1 Unit

This course gives the student an opportunity to demonstrate their qualifications to enter the clinical section of their physical therapy education.

PT 752, Cardiopulmonary Patient Management, 3 Units

This course presents basic cardiac and pulmonary pathology and theories leading to decision-making skills in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. Presentation of case studies reinforces management of patients with cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Practical application of theoretical concepts is emphasized.

PT 754, General Medicine, 3 Units

This course gives students experience in the management of general medicine patients with acute, chronic, and terminal diseases. The laboratory portion of the course assists in developing clinical skills and reasoning to determine appropriate and safe therapeutic procedures and protocols for this population.

PT 760, Pediatrics, 4 Units

This course provides the background knowledge needed to assess functional status, evaluate, and develop appropriate treatment programs for infants and children from premature birth to adolescence. Lab sessions allow for observation and assessment of typical development and the opportunity to experience a variety of intervention strategies.

PT 762, Seminar II, 2 Units

(30 contact hours) The clinical performance instrument is reviewed in this course, and written and oral communication skills specific to the clinic are refined. Expectations of clinical professional behavior are also emphasized. The student presents an in-service on a specific evaluation or treatment approach to be used in the clinic, incorporating lecture and lab into instruction. The student's performance is self assessed, peer assessed, and evaluated by the instructor.

PT 764, Current Concepts in Chronic Pain, 2 Units

In this course students participate in evidence-based discussions incorporating critical appraisal of the evidence, as well as in critical problem solving discussions with case studies. Students also discuss and apply knowledge of abnormal pain mechanisms to common case scenarios incorporating lecture material with current evidence. Further, students evaluate their problem solving strategies through self reflective assignments, peer interaction and evaluation by the course instructor to facilitate self directed learning.

PT 768, Administration, 3 Units

(75 contact hours) This course presents the basic components of administration, financial and staff management, marketing strategies, and public relations for clinical directors and/or owners. Administrative and contractual legal issues and reimbursement mechanisms are explored.

PT 771, Clinical Experience I, 9 Units

PT 771, PT 773, and PT 775 are three clinical experiences which provide integration of prior didactic work with full time clinical exposure under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. Courses may be taken in any order as offered in the curriculum.

PT 773, Clinical Experience II, 9 Units

PT 771, PT 773, and PT 775 are three clinical experiences which provide integration of prior didactic work with full time clinical exposure under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. Courses may be taken in any order as offered in the curriculum.

PT 774, Capstone I, 3 Units

In the first of the capstone course series, students choose a clinical question of interest and conduct an extensive literature review.

PT 775, Clinical Experience III, 9 Units

PT 771, PT 773, and PT 775 are three clinical experiences which provide integration of prior didactic work with full time clinical exposure under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. Courses may be taken in any order as offered in the curriculum.

PT 775A, Clinical Experience III, 5 Units

This is the third of three clinical rotations providing the opportunity for integration of prior didactic work with full-time clinical exposure (480 contact hours) under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist.

PT 775B, Clinical Experience III, 5 Units

This is the third of three clinical rotations providing the opportunity for integration of prior didactic work with full-time clinical exposure (480 contact hours) under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist.

PT 776, Capstone II, 3 Units

In this, the second course in the capstone series, research of the clinical question continues through faculty-supervised collection and synthesis of data.

PT 778, Diagnostic Imaging, 3 Units

(45 contact hours) This course familiarizes the Doctor of Physical Therapy student with the indications, instrumentation, and clinical interpretation of orthopedic imaging techniques including plane film X-ray, magnetic resonance, computerized tomography, and radioisotope imaging. Selection protocols for each are discussed to acquaint the student with advantages and disadvantages of each method and what type of information each technique best presents. This course focuses on the clinical interpretation and practical integration of imaging data into rehabilitation treatment regimen design and communication with other medical professionals.

PT 779, Special Topics II, 2 Units

This is the second of two courses that examine specialized topics/techniques of current interest for physical therapists. Material includes men's and women's health, performing artist dysfunction, sport-specific taping and rehabilitation, and on-field support for athletes. Lectures and hands-on lab sessions give students opportunities to evaluate and to develop and administer a plan of care in each of the specialty areas, under faculty supervision.

PT 781, Integrated Clinical Education, 1 Unit

This course allows students to integrate didactic learning with a part-time clinical experience under the supervision and mentorship of a licensed physical therapist.

PT 783, Integrated Community Service, 0 Units

In this course, students integrate didactic and clinical learning with clinical service to the global or local community under the mentorship and supervision of a licensed physical therapist.

PT 785, Advanced Patient Management, 2 Units

This is the last in a series of patient management courses. Within a strong clinical reasoning framework, students evaluate and plan intervention strategies for more complex patient problems, as well as for patient impairments complicated by the involvement of multiple other factors/systems. Students integrate analysis skills, manual skills, motor control and motor learning concepts, therapeutic exercise, physical agents, and patient education into the management of the patient's movement. In addition to refining their existing skills, students are introduced to more advanced examination and intervention techniques. Students also employ clinical reasoning to formulate management plans that require prioritization and collaboration with the patient/client in order to accommodate environmental, financial, cultural, psychosocial, and time-restriction factors typical of current clinical practice. The patient problems encountered and analyzed throughout the course, and the clinical reasoning process applied to all components of these clinical problems, facilitate the development of clinical reasoning and clinical pattern recognition.

PT 790, Physical Diagnosis Screening, 4 Units

This course prepares students to utilize various methods of physical examination to identify which pathologies are and are not amenable to physical therapy intervention. Students gain experience with EKG interpretation, heart and lung sounds, otoscopic and opthalmic examination, basic hematological and serum chemistry analysis, HEENT exams, peripheral vascular exams, psychological screening, abdominal palpation, and dermatological examination.

PT 794, Fellowship I, 2 Units

This course is an integration of key movement approaches advocated by Shirley Sahrmann PT, Ph.D.; Vladimir Janda, MD, D.Sc.; and Pavel Kolar, PT, Ph.D., focusing on specific movement impairments in the spine and upper and lower quarters, including the interaction between the central nervous system and motor system in the production of movement, stability, and/or controlled mobility. This course also includes instruction in principles of biomechanics, ergonomics, and body proportions and their relationship to movement impairments that limit optimal performance of function.

PT 795, Fellowship II, 3 Units

This course builds on clinical reasoning skills with instruction/problem-solving discussion on intervention strategies for patients with complex rehabilitation issues including chronic pain. Application of the movement approach and strength and conditioning are applied to athletes with focus on running, rotation and overhead sports, contact sports, and performing artists.

Prerequisite: PT 794

PT 796, Fellowship III, 3 Units

This course builds on clinical reasoning skills with instruction/problem-solving discussion on intervention strategies for patients with complex rehabilitation issues, including rotation and overhead sports, contact sports, and performing artists. Application of the movement approach and strength and conditioning are applied to athletes.

PT 797, Fellowship IV, 2 Units

This course builds on clinical reasoning skills with instruction/problem-solving discussion on intervention strategies for patients with complex rehabilitation issues including concussions and vestibular issues.

Prerequisite: PT 796

PT 798, Special Topics I, 2 Units

This is the first of two courses which examine specialized topics/techniques of current interest for physical therapists. This course includes topics of movement science, basic taping techniques for the orthopedic and neurologic populations, ergonomics, wound care and lymphedema management. Lecture and hands on lab sessions will provide opportunities for the student to evaluate, develop and administer a plan of care in each of the specialty areas under faculty supervision.

PT 799, Independent Study, 1-6 Units

Students enroll in this course to pursue independent study investigating subjects and interests that lie beyond regular course offerings. The student explores topics in greater depth than in other courses and/or initiates an individual project. Readings are pursued in accordance with a study plan, which is developed in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and approved by the department chair.

RMS 701, Foundations of Rehabilitation and Movement Science, 3 Units

This course provides the foundation for doctoral studies and careers in the field of rehabilitation and movement science, equipping students with fundamental knowledge, principles, and primary concepts underlying the field, historical perspectives and current models of health care, and new areas of study being explored. The course is divided into two parts: the first provides the framework necessary for understanding the field, and the second uses a mixture of lectures and independent learning to explore the subspecialties of each student.

RMS 702, Basic Biostatistics I, 4 Units

This course focuses on introductory and advanced analysis of variance (ANOVA) methods and their relation to rehabilitation and movement science research. Advanced ANOVA methods covered in this course include repeated measure, mixed design, ANCOVA, and MANOVA. Specifically, students learn to implement, analyze, and report ANOVA findings for APA-style journal publications. Use of SPSS and R is emphasized.

Corequisite: RMS 702L

RMS 702L, Basic Biostatistics Lab, 1 Unit

In this course, the lab component to RMS 702, students apply the statistical analysis knowledge from RMS 702 to computational procedures using SPSS and R.

Corequisite: RMS 702

RMS 703, Teaching, Learning, and Assessment Theory and Methods, 3 Units

This course equips future academicians with knowledge and skills in teaching, learning, and assessment, preparing them to fulfill their roles as instructors in a way that promotes high levels of student engagement and growth. Students in this course develop a coherent personal philosophy of teaching and learning, and create a unit of study reflecting that philosophy that includes meaningful assessments of learning.

RMS 704, Research for the Rehabilitation and Movement Scientist, 3 Units

This course introduces the concepts of research in rehabilitation and movement science: research design and statistical methods, critical evaluation of published research relevant to rehabilitation science, scientific writing, and preparation for conducting clinical research.

RMS 705, Instrumentation and Outcome Measures, 3 Units

This course covers the basic principles of how to design and utilize outcome measures and instrumentation, and how to scrutinize their psychometric properties. In addition, students gain greater insight on how to select the outcome measure(s) and instrumentation they intend to use in their Ph.D. field of study.

RMS 706, Leadership Theories Applied to Rehabilitation Education and Administration, 3 Units

Students in this course explore leadership theories related to organizational leadership and apply them to the context of higher education. In doing so, students discover and define their individual leadership philosophy and competency model.

RMS 707, Ethics in Education and Research, 3 Units

This course provides a foundation for future educators and researchers to promote responsible conduct in education, health care, and research. Students become familiar with current issues and debates in healthcare education and research ethics, and prepare for the kinds of ethical issues and federal requirements they will encounter throughout their careers. The course starts with a review of the history of and debate over ethics and research, focusing on those involved in the healthcare field and analyzing the various ethical dimensions of different types of research and academia in health care, in particular informed consent, risk-benefit assessment, ethical review, and research with special populations. It then offers the opportunity to study, in more detail, subjects such as research with children and animals, ethics review committees, and research integrity.

RMS 708, Literature Appraisal: Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis, 3 Units

This course helps students develop important skills in engaging with the literature in the field. Students systematically extract the relevant literature in an area of interest, develop protocols, then critically appraise and succinctly summarize the main findings and relate them to the focus of their doctoral study.

RMS 709, Grant and Scientific Writing, 3 Units

Students in this course develop valuable skills in designing research studies for grant applications. The course includes a step-by-step introduction to identifying gaps in research and potential funders in the area of interest, crafting research aims and objectives, developing protocols, and creating collaborative grant proposals worthy of funder consideration.

Prerequisite: RMS 701, RMS 704

RMS 710, Intermediate Biostatistics II, 4 Units

This course focuses on introductory and advanced regression methods, the latter of which includes hierarchal regression, mediation, moderation, and logistic regression. Students learn to implement, analyze, and report regression findings for APA-style journal publications. Use of SPSS and R is emphasized.

Prerequisite: RMS 702;

Corequisite: RMS 710L

RMS 710L, Intermediate Biostatistics Lab, 1 Unit

In this course, the lab component to RMS 710, students apply the statistical analysis knowledge from RMS 710 to computational procedures using SPSS and R.

Corequisite: RMS 710

RMS 711, Concentration Independent Inquiry I, 3 Units

This independent inquiry course is designed by the Ph.D. student and approved by the instructor. The course covers an area of inquiry - via a research, reading, study, or learning activity - that contributes a dimension of knowledge or understanding to the student's doctoral focus in addition to that provided in the general program curriculum.

RMS 712, Mixed Methods, 4 Units

This course provides an in-depth study of how to plan, conduct, and analyze studies that use mixed-methods research designs, including correlational, survey, and qualitative methods. Students identify core areas of mixed-methods research in behavioral and applied sciences research and begin building a strong research concept about those areas. This course also emphasizes scale development methods used in behavioral and applied sciences.

RMS 713, Teaching Practicum, 3 Units

This is an independent inquiry course in which a student works with a faculty mentor to design and develop lecture content, learning outcomes, and assessment methods for either a preprofessional course or a professional or postprofessional curriculum including program outcomes.

Prerequisite: RMS 703

RMS 714, Interdisciplinary Topics Seminar I, 1 Unit

This course introduces the science of motor control/motor learning, including the neuromotor processes that underlie normal and abnormal movement. Theories of motor learning and mechanisms for acquisition of skill are discussed. Neuromotor and neuropsychological research are investigated and clinical implications are considered.

RMS 715, Interdisciplinary Topics Seminar II, 1 Unit

In this course focusing on chronic pain as a multidimensional experience, students examine the roles of physical therapists in the management of patients/clients with chronic pain conditions. Students apply knowledge of the neurophysiological basis of pain-and of the factors that differentiate acute, "normal" pain from various chronic, "abnormal" pain mechanisms-to evaluation and intervention strategies, including those incorporating a neuroplastic approach to chronic pain. Other topics addressed, within the context of treating the whole person, are biomedical, biopsychosocial, and environmental factors that predispose to development of chronic pain, and prevention strategies. Students engage in critical appraisal of the evidence and science underlying pain and its management, and utilize case studies in critical problem-solving discussions that incorporate lecture material with current evidence. Students evaluate their problem-solving strategies through self-reflective assignments, peer interaction, and evaluation by the course instructor to facilitate self-directed learning.

RMS 716, Interdisciplinary Topics Seminar III, 1 Unit

This course focuses on the theoretical concepts and methodologies related to the study of biomechanics, and helps students develop a theoretical biomechanical research question informed by scientific evidence and knowledge gained throughout the course. Students review traditional and current biomechanical research methods, with a focus on interpretation of previous research and its application to future research questions, and also examine biomechanical demands on tendons, joints, and muscles, as well as whole-body movement patterns. Students participate in hands-on application using biomechanical assessment tools such as 3D motion capture, force-plates, EMG, dynamometer, and clinically relevant biomechanical tests. They also discuss and analyze a variety of available methods for biomechanical analysis, and design appropriate procedures to assess kinematic and kinetic outcomes.

Prerequisite: RMS 705

RMS 717, Interdisciplinary Topics Seminar IV, 1 Unit

In this course, students gain valuable insight and skills in how to detect and manage mental health disorders. Students learn to use screening tools, and also learn about the pathophysiology of conditions, barriers to service delivery, and the roles of the mental health interdisciplinary team.

RMS 718, Concentration Independent Inquiry II, 3 Units

This independent inquiry course is designed by the Ph.D. student and approved by the instructor. The course covers an area of inquiry - via a research, reading, study, or learning activity - that is part of the student's doctoral focus and not already covered in the program.

RMS 719, Qualifying Examination and Research Prospectus, 1 Unit

In this course, students prepare for and complete a qualifying exam and write a research prospectus for a future study. The qualifying exam is composed of an oral presentation of the written research prospectus and a comprehensive written exam.

Prerequisite: RMS 701, RMS 702, RMS 702L, RMS 703, RMS 704, RMS 705, RMS 706, RMS 707, RMS 708, RMS 709, RMS 710, RMS 710L, RMS 711, RMS 712, RMS 713, RMS 714, RMS 715, RMS 716, RMS 717;

Corequisite: RMS 718

RMS 720, Dissertation I: Introduction and Systematic Review, 3 Units

This course, the first in a series addressing the dissertation, supports students' development of the dissertation proposal, focusing on the preparation and critique of chapter one (the introduction) and chapter two (the literature review).

RMS 721, Dissertation II: Methods and Research Proposal, 3 Units

This course, the second in a series addressing the dissertation, assists students with the continuing development of the first three dissertation chapters and with obtaining Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, culminating in the proposal defense.

Prerequisite: RMS 720

RMS 722, Dissertation III: Data Collection, Results, and Analysis, 3 Units

This course, the third in a series addressing the dissertation, supports students' continued writing of the first four chapters of the dissertation, including data collection, data entry, and analysis.

Prerequisite: RMS 720, RMS 721, and successful proposal defense.

RMS 723, Dissertation IV: Discussion and Research Defense, 3 Units

This course, the fourth in a series addressing the dissertation, supports students' completion of the dissertation process, including discussion of the main findings in comparison to published literature, final conclusions, and preparation for the dissertation defense.

Prerequisite: RMS 720, RMS 721 and RMS 722

RMS 749, Dissertation Continuation I, 1 Unit

This course is a self-directed continuation of the student's dissertation work on their methods and research proposal. Course may be repeated until the work is complete.

Prerequisite: RMS 721

RMS 750, Dissertation Continuation II, 1 Unit

This course is a self-directed continuation of the student's dissertation work. Course may be repeated until the work is complete.

Prerequisite: RMS 723

Faculty

Department Chair

Susan Shore, PT, Ph.D.

Program Directors

Annette Karim, PT, DPT, Ph.D., OCS, FAAOMPT, Ph.D. and Postprofessional Programs

Derrick G. Sueki, PT, DPT, Ph.D., GCPT, OCS, FAAOMPT, DPT Program

Professors

Kathryn Kumagai Shimamura, PT, DPT, NCS, OCS, CSCS, FAAOMPT

Susan Shore, PT, Ph.D.

Abebaw Yohannes, Ph.D.

Associate Professors

Wendy Chung, PT, D.Sc.

Tamara Eichelberger, PT, CSCS, Ph.D., NCS

Daniel Farwell, PT, DPT, SCS

Chris Patterson, PT, DPT, OCS

Michael Wong, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT

Assistant Professors

Melissa Cole, PT, DPT, PCS

Mary Hudson-McKinney, PT, DPT, NCS

Annette Karim, PT, DPT, Ph.D., OCS, FAAOMPT

Grace Matsuda, PT, DPT

Derrick G. Sueki, PT, DPT, Ph.D., GCPT, OCS, FAAOMPT

Adjunct Faculty

Elizabeth Ashoff, PT, DPT, NCS

Mark Baker, PT, DPT, OCS

Katherine Finn, PT, DPT, OCS

Clare Frank, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT

Valerie Hanson, DPT, PT, DPT, NCS

Jaclyn Harrison, PT, DPT, NCS

Vicky Hu, PT, DPT, CCS, CSCS

Lisa Hwang, PT, DPT, D.Sc.

Louie Labial, PT, DPT

Anne LeMoine, PT, DPT, OCS

Marshall LeMoine, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT

Amanda McCoid, PT, DPT

Charmayne Ross, PT, D.Sc.

Claire Smith, PT, DPT, NCS

Ryan Somers, PT, DPT