Department of Kinesiology

The Department of Kinesiology equips students who are academically engaged, relationally centered, vocationally aware, and wellness oriented using approaches that are discipline based and grounded in a Christian worldview.

The Department of Kinesiology equips students who are academically engaged, relationally centered, vocationally aware, and wellness oriented using approaches that are discipline based and grounded in a Christian worldview. It offers a kinesiology major, with concentrations in health professions and applied exercise science; an undergraduate minor in adapted physical activity; and a concentration in physical education for the liberal studies major (see Liberal Studies/Undergraduate Education K-8 program for specific requirements). The department also offers graduate programs in athletic training and physical education.

The Master of Science in Athletic Training (MSAT) prepares students for careers in athletic training. The men and women of this service profession desire to enhance the quality of health care for patients and physically active individuals, specializing in the prevention, assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses.

The Master of Science in Physical Education equips candidates with the knowledge and skills needed to teach physical education, administrate athletics programs, and coach at the K-12, junior college, and four-year university levels. This degree is also available online and with an emphasis in sport management.

The Master of Arts in Physical Education and Single Subject Teaching Credential program equips students with the skills and knowledge needed to teach physical education and coach at the K-12, junior college, and four-year university levels. In addition to the master’s degree, students earn a 2042 Single Subject Teaching Credential, preparing them for positions at the middle and high school levels (7-12) and as pre-K-12 specialists in physical education.

The Master of Arts in Physical Education with an Added Authorization in Adapted Physical Education program is designed for candidates who possess a teaching credential in physical education and are also seeking to teach adapted physical education in the pre-K-12 and/or community college systems.

The Adapted Physical Education Added Authorization enables the physical education teacher to teach disabled students ranging from preschool through adult school, conduct assessments, and report findings through the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process.

Accreditation

AT 160, Acute Care of Injury and Illness, 2 Units

This course follows the basic guidelines of the American Red Cross courses CPR for the Professional Rescuer and First Aid. Included are adult, child, and infant CPR, two-person CPR, use of an AED, and standard first aid procedures. Students may receive American Red Cross certifications upon successful completion of the course.

AT 340, Practicum In Orthopedic Assessment, 2 Units

This course is designed for junior-level students in the Athletic Training Education Program. Students are assigned to clinical instructors who directly supervise them as they work in athletic training settings. As students display competence in the Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they are given increased responsibility in working directly with patients. In addition to the responsibilities of AT 242, students may begin performing orthopedic injury assessments.

Prerequisite: AT 270

AT 355, Medical Conditions and Disabilities, 2 Units

This course covers the basic knowledge, skills, and values that health professionals, specifically those working with athletes and active populations, must possess in order to appropriately recognize and treat those with general medical conditions. Recognition of conditions that must be referred to other healthcare professionals for further evaluation and treatment will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: BIOL 115 or BIOL 250/BIOL 251 and AES 363

AT 444, General Practicum in Athletic Training, 1-3 Units

Students are assigned to clinical instructors who directly supervise them as they work in athletic training settings. As students display competence in the Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they are given increased responsibility in working directly with patients.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into Athletic Training Education Program

AT 469, Health Care Administration, 3 Units

This course addresses the organizational and administrative aspects of health care to the physically active. Students study such issues as medical record keeping, facility design and maintenance, leadership strategies, insurance issues, public relations, and legal and ethical issues related to health care.

Corequisite: AES 473 and Senior Standing

AT 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

AT 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The one-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than one unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

AT 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, or electronic media. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Upper-division writing intensive course or instructor consent; and junior or senior standing

AT 501, Foundations of Athletic Training, 3 Units

The focus of this course is on the basic tenets of athletic training and the healthcare team, as well as emergency care. Students learn how to prepare for emergencies and how to create emergency action plans, as well as how to prevent, assess, and treat environmental injuries and illnesses.

AT 511, Foundations of Athletic Training, 5 Units

This course provides students with basic information and skills necessary in the clinical practice of athletic training. Topics include acute care, risk management, orthopedic taping and wrapping, and equipment fitting. Students will also learn the roles and responsibilities of a certified athletic trainer and the sports medicine team. Students are also introduced to evidence-based practice concepts. A laboratory component is included.

AT 513, Fundamental Skills in Athletic Training, 3 Units

This course provides students with basic information and skills necessary in the clinical practice of athletic training. Topics include acute care, risk management, orthopedic taping and wrapping, and equipment fitting. The course provides an opportunity for students to practice skills introduced in AT 501 or AT 511.

AT 515, Anatomical Basis of Athletic Training, 4 Units

This course provides an in-depth look at human anatomy, with an emphasis on musculoskeletal anatomy, functional anatomy, and basic kinesiology principles. The lab component will include the use of cadavers.

AT 518, Foundations of Examination and Diagnosis: Lower Extremity, 3 Units

This is one in a series of courses offering an in-depth inquiry into the pathophysiology of injuries to the physically active. This course emphasizes injuries to the lower extremity, addressing mechanisms of injury as well as specific evaluation techniques and methods standard to the practice of athletic training.

AT 522, Foundations of Therapeutic Interventions: Lower Extremity, 3 Units

This course focuses on the theory, selection, and operation of common therapeutic interventions used to manage injuries experienced by physically active individuals. Included are therapeutic modalities, therapeutic and corrective exercise, and an introduction to basic pharmacological interventions.

AT 524, Principles of Evidence-Based Practice, 2 Units

The focus of this course is evidence-based practice (EBP) in athletic training. Students learn to critically read athletic training literature using EBP tools, and to make clinical decisions based on evidence from the literature, experience, and patient needs and goals.

AT 525, Research Methods I, 3 Units

This is the first of two courses in research methodology. The focus of this course is the critical reading of athletic training and sports medicine literature, the interpretation of research, and the analysis of research methodology appropriate to the field. In addition, each student creates a research proposal as the first step in their research project.

AT 528, Clinical Integration I, 3 Units

In this, the first of five clinical education courses, each student focuses on developing proficiency in lower-extremity assessments and the application of therapeutic modalities. Each student is assigned to a preceptor who directly supervises them as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they are given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

AT 531, Examination, Diagnosis, and Interventions: Upper Extremity, 4 Units

This course is part of a series of courses offering an in-depth inquiry into the pathophysiology of injuries to the physically active, and therapeutic interventions used to examine, diagnose, and manage those injuries. This course emphasizes injuries to the upper extremity, addressing mechanisms of injury and specific evaluation techniques and therapeutic interventions standard to the practice of athletic training.

AT 534, Biomechanics, 3 Units

This course focuses on qualitative and quantitative analysis of human movement. Screenings and calculations will focus on skills common in sport and physical activity as well as gait analysis by the application of principles of anatomy, kinesiology, and physics.

AT 535, Data Analysis and Patient Outcomes, 2 Units

This is the second of two courses in evidence-based practice. Students in this course explore current athletic training research and interpret the results of data analyses, with an emphasis on applying evidence to patient outcome collection and clinical decision making.

AT 539, Clinical Integration II, 3 Units

In this, the second of five clinical education courses, each student focuses on developing proficiency in lower-extremity assessments, upper-extremity assessments, and the application of therapeutic modalities. Each student is assigned a preceptor who directly supervises then as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they are given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

AT 541, Nutrition for Active People, 2 Units

This course focuses on nutrition related to exercise and physical performance. These aspects include the energy systems in exercise, nutritional aspects of substrate utilization (digestion, absorption, metabolism, etc.), assessment of nutritional needs, and diet modification. Dietary development for weight loss, body composition changes, and performance will be covered from a nutritional viewpoint.

AT 542, Examination, Diagnosis, and Interventions: Spine and Core, 4 Units

This is one course in a series of courses offering an in-depth inquiry into the pathophysiology of injuries to the physically active, and therapeutic interventions used to examine, diagnose and manage those injuries. This course emphasizes injuries to the head and face, and the lumbar, thoracic, and cervical spine. Mechanisms of injury are addressed, as well as specific evaluation techniques and therapeutic interventions standard to the practice of athletic training.

AT 543, Strength and Conditioning, 3 Units

This course uses a scientific and integrated approach to the assessment, development, implementation, and management of strengthening and conditioning. A laboratory component is included.

AT 545, Topics in Athletic Training, 3 Units

Students in this course explore topics necessary to maintaining relevant competence and enabling future growth as an athletic training professional. Topics include the role of the Athletic Trainer in public health outcomes, healthcare delivery strategies, quality assessment and improvement of healthcare systems and practitioners, professional ethics, emerging evaluation and intervention strategies, and the use of technology in medicine.

AT 547, Clinical Integration III, 2 Units

In this, the third of five clinical education courses, each student focuses on developing proficiency in movement assessment and continues to develop clinically in the areas of emergency management and patient outcomes collection. Each student is assigned to a preceptor who directly supervises them as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they are given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

AT 549, Applied Research I, 1 Unit

In this course, students meet with their research team and mentor to identify a clinical question of interest, conduct a literature review, and plan the methods and data collection for their research project.

AT 552, Examination, Diagnosis, and Interventions: Medical Conditions, 4 Units

This course covers the knowledge, skills, and values that entry-level certified athletic trainers must possess in order to recognize, treat, and refer, when appropriate, the general medical conditions and disabilities commonly seen in athletic training settings. This includes pharmacology as it relates to medical conditions and disabilities of the active, as well as ergogenic aids common to the population. The recognition of general medical conditions contains the skills needed in the diagnostic process. A laboratory component is included.

AT 554, Holistic Aspects of Athletic Training, 3 Units

This course provides the necessary knowledge and skills for assessing and managing psychosocial issues in athletic training. The influences of culture and spirituality, including religions, are discussed in addition to psychosocial interventions, spiritual interventions, and referral strategies which are specific to the role of an athletic trainer. Eating disorders, anxiety issues, substance abuse, catastrophic injuries, peer pressure, depression, and responses to injury are some of the many issues discussed.

AT 555, Therapeutic Exercise, 3 Units

This course focuses on the theory and operation of various contemporary methods of therapeutic exercise in the rehabilitation of injuries to the physically active. The student is introduced to manual as well as mechanical testing and other primary components of comprehensive rehabilitation designs and implementation, including determining therapeutic goals, progress, and ability to return to participation. A laboratory component is included.

AT 557, Clinical Integration IV, 2 Units

In this, the fourth of five clinical education courses, each student continues their clinical development in the area of injury evaluation with the inclusion of movement assessment, and in the application of therapeutic modalities and therapeutic exercise. Each student is assigned to a preceptor who directly supervises them as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display their competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they are given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

AT 559, Applied Research II, 1 Unit

In this course, students meet with their research team and mentor to collect and synthesize data for their research project.

AT 562, Health Care Administration, 3 Units

This course addresses the administrative aspects of health care across a variety of athletic training settings. Students study topics such as healthcare delivery models, multipayor insurance systems and classifications, quality assurance and improvement, healthcare information and informatics, facility and personnel management, and legal issues related to health care.

AT 564, Seminar in Athletic Training, 1 Unit

This course provides an integration of prior coursework and expertise in athletic training preparation for the Board of Certification (BOC) exam, as well as a forum for discussion of current athletic training issues.

AT 566, Patient Populations in Emerging Settings, 1 Unit

Students in this course are introduced to athletic trainers, other medical professionals, and patient representatives from emerging athletic training work settings. The format of guest speaker course meetings mirrors two-hour continuing education sessions with embedded workshops to apply patient-specific skills to simulated patients.

AT 568, Clinical Integration V, 2 Units

This is the fifth of five clinical education courses. Each student will be assigned to a preceptor who directly supervises them as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they will be given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

AT 569, Research Capstone, 3 Units

Students will work with their research team and mentor to complete their research project. The project will be presented in print and poster format following appropriate professional guidelines.

AT 570, Clinical Integration V, 5 Units

In this, the fifth of five clinical education courses, students focus on completing graduation requirements and submitting capstone projects related to the development of their clinical practice. Each student is assigned to a preceptor who directly supervises them as they practice and refine their skills in an athletic training setting. As students display their competence with/through the Clinical Integration Proficiencies in Athletic Training, they are given increased responsibility in directly working with patients.

ATHL 301, Varsity Baseball: Men, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced preparation in baseball strategy, fundamentals, and techniques for intercollegiate competition (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 302, Varsity Basketball: Men, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced instruction and intensive training in the fundamentals of basketball. Individual and team play, strategy, and offensive and defensive formations are utilized in men's intercollegiate basketball (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 303, Varsity Track and Field: Men and Women, 1-2 Units

Students train and work out two hours daily in various track and field events and compete in intercollegiate track and field meets (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 304, Varsity Cross Country: Men and Women, 1-2 Units

Students receive instruction, practice, and training in distance running for intercollegiate competition (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 305, Varsity Tennis: Men and Women, 1-2 Units

Students are instructed in the mechanics of the game to suit the individual. Supervised practice, lectures, and intercollegiate competition are included (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 307, Varsity Football: Men, 1-2 Units

Conditioning and training are practiced in all phases of modern football. Students view pictures, study plays, and participate in chalk talks, examination of team plays, and intercollegiate competition (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 308, Varsity Basketball: Women, 1-2 Units

Advanced instruction and intensive training in the fundamentals of basketball are offered. Individual and team play, strategy, and offensive and defensive formations are utilized in intercollegiate competition (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 309, Varsity Volleyball: Women, 1-2 Units

Students participate in intercollegiate competition with intense instruction in fundamentals, theory, and practice of the strategies of offensive and defensive play (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 310, Varsity Soccer: Men, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced preparation in strategy, fundamentals, and techniques for intercollegiate competition (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 311, Varsity Soccer: Women, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced preparation in strategy, fundamentals, and techniques for intercollegiate competition (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 312, Varsity Softball: Women, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced preparation in strategy, fundamentals, and techniques for intercollegiate competition (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 313, Varsity Swimming and Diving: Women, 1-2 Units

Students receive instruction, practice, and training in swimming and diving for intercollegiate competition (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 314, Varsity Water Polo: Women, 1-2 Units

Advanced instruction and intensive training in the fundamentals of water polo are offered, including individual and team play, strategy, and offensive and defensive formations in preparation for intercollegiate competition (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 315, Varsity Acrobatics and Tumbling, 1-2 Units

Students receive advanced instruction and training in tumbling, stunting, and dance, including preparing for intercollegiate competition; may be repeated for credit (varsity athletes only). Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

ATHL 316, Varsity Cheer, 1 Unit

Students participate in intercollegiate activities with intense instruction in fundamentals, theory, and practice of the strategies for collegiate cheer. Varsity athletes only. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 108, Fitness for Life: Walking/Jogging, 1 Unit

This course teaches the "fitness for life" concept through walking and jogging. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 109, Fitness for Life: Cycling, 1 Unit

This course emphasizes fitness through cycling. Students are instructed in bicycle care, repair, and safety rules, and much time is spent in practical travel lab experience. Students must provide their own bicycles. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 110, Fitness for Life: Basketball, 1 Unit

This course teaches the "fitness for life" concept through basketball. This course is not open to students participating in intercollegiate basketball. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 112, Fitness for Life: Beginning Swimming and Conditioning, 1 Unit

This course teaches the "fitness for life" concept through swimming. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 113, Fitness for Life: Ultimate Frisbee, 1 Unit

This course teaches the fitness-for-life concept through Ultimate Frisbee, emphasizing the development of skills specifically for the Ultimate Frisbee game. The rules, tactics, and various offensive and defensive strategies of the game are also covered. Specific conditioning drills are incorporated into each class to develop muscular endurance and strength, and the recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibers needed to play Ultimate Frisbee. This course may be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 114, Fitness for Life: Flag Football, 1 Unit

This course teaches the fitness-for-life concept through flag football, emphasizing the development of skills specifically for the flag football game. The rules, tactics, and various offensive and defensive strategies of the game are also covered. Specific conditioning drills are incorporated into each class to develop muscular endurance and strength, and the recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibers needed to play the game of flag football. This course may be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 115, Fitness for Life: Recreational Games, 1 Unit

This course teaches the fitness-for-life concept through recreational games such as cornhole, spikeball, bocce, etc., emphasizing the development of skills specifically for various recreational games. The rules, tactics, and offensive and defensive strategies of the games are also covered. Specific conditioning drills are incorporated into each class to develop muscular endurance and strength, and the recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibers needed to play recreational games. This course may be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 116, Fitness for Life: Weight Training, 1 Unit

This course teaches the "fitness for life" concept through weight training, with different sections offered for athletes and nonathletes. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 117, Fitness for Life: Cardio Strength Fusion, 1 Unit

This course teaches the concepts of "fitness for life" through various styles of cardio and strength conditioning, blending cardio dance, strength training, and yoga. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 118, Fitness for Life: Triathlon, 1 Unit

This course emphasizes fitness through swimming, cycling, and running. The goal is that by the end of the course, students will be able to participate in minitriathlons, or simply have increased their fitness level. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 121, Fitness for Life: Dance for the Theater, 2 Units

This course teaches the skill of movement and dance as it relates to actors, including proficiency in various styles of dance that are most common in musical theater; learning dance terminology necessary for a working actor; gaining flexibility and dexterity to enhance stage performance; understanding what is required at a professional theater audition; and moral issues pertaining to presenting theater dance to an audience. It also teaches "fitness for life" concepts through various dance and aerobic conditioning exercises. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 122, Fitness for Life: Hiking, 1 Unit

This course teaches the "fitness for life" concept through hiking local trails, and includes instruction in trail first aid and emergency preparedness. Students provide their own transportation to local hiking trails. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 125, Fitness for Life: Yoga, 1 Unit

This course teaches the "fitness for life" concept through yoga, and includes instruction in mind-body awareness, body-weight-bearing exercises, torso stability, and intermediate balance. Students learn strength, flexibility, and relaxation through a series of postures and breathing techniques. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 126, Fitness for Life: Sand Volleyball, 1 Unit

This course teaches the "fitness for life" concept through sand volleyball, emphasizing the development of sand volleyball skills specifically for the sand doubles game. The rules, tactics and various offensive and defensive strategies of the game are also covered. Specific sand conditioning drills are incorporated into each class to develop muscular endurance, muscular strength, and the recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibers needed to play the game of sand volleyball. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 127, Fitness for Life: Soccer, 1 Unit

This course teaches the "fitness for life" concept through soccer, covering basic soccer skills and technique and providing opportunities for cardiovascular conditioning. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 128, Fitness for Life: 5K (Beginning), 1 Unit

This course teaches the "fitness for life" concept through training to run a 5k. The workouts in this course are designed to help students start from scratch and safely work their way up to running 3.1 miles without stopping. Using a run/walk approach, students gradually increase the distance they run while decreasing the distance they walk over the course of the semester. Students also receive a brief introduction to basic weight training at the end of the semester. May be repeated for credit. Students will be required to pay the entry fees for a 5k race. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 129, Fitness for Life: 5k (Intermediate), 1 Unit

This course teaches the "fitness for life" concept through training to run a 5k. The workouts in this course are designed for students who have running experience and are looking to improve their fitness by training for a 5k. Using an interval approach, students gradually increase their running distance and speed over the course of the semester. A brief introduction to basic weight training is covered at the end of the semester. May be repeated for credit. Students will be required to pay the entry fees for a 5k race. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 130, Fitness for Life: Zumba, 1 Unit

This course is designed to increase fitness and stamina through participation in a cardio dance class called Zumba, which is a combination of Latin/international music and upbeat dance movements. May be repeated for credit. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

FFL 131, Fitness for Life: Kinesiology, 1 Unit

This course gives kinesiology students the opportunity to experience structured exercise programming and develop the tools essential for adopting and maintaining healthy exercise behavior (e.g., goal setting, action planning, self-monitoring). Emphasis is on developing students' confidence in the performance of fundamental exercises that promote physical fitness, including flexibility, muscular endurance/strength/power, and cardiorespiratory endurance. Meets the General Education Requirement: Fitness for Life/Varsity Sport. 

KIN 102, Foundations of Kinesiology, 2 Units

This course introduces the student to the professions of kinesiology by reviewing the historical foundations of the profession and defining the roles and responsibilities of the exercise scientist. Students learn about relevant professional associations and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology. A discussion of the Azusa Pacific University kinesiology curriculum is included with the goals, objectives, and requirements of the program as well as the expectations of kinesiology students.

KIN 220, Emergency Care and Clinical Skills, 3 Units

The course prepares students for American Red Cross CPR and First Aid certifications. In addition, students will learn and apply clinical skills including assessment of vitals, palpation, goniometry, and manual muscle testing.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 102

KIN 242, Fundamental Principles of Fitness, 3 Units

This foundation course will investigate fitness principles for improving cardio-respiratory endurance, strength, flexibility, body composition and overall physical wellness. The course will prepare students with the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to develop, implement and manage basic fitness programs for physical education students and health fitness clients.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251

KIN 270, Human Motor Control, Learning, and Development, 3 Units

This course focuses on the physiological and psychological mechanisms underlying the control and learning of human movement throughout the lifespan. Students apply theoretical concepts of learning to develop age-appropriate movement programs, and measure outcomes through performance examinations.

C- or higher in KIN 102; corequisite: BIOL 230 or BIOL 250

KIN 275, Biomechanics of Human Movement, 3 Units

This course examines biomechanical principles applied to physical activity, sport, and rehabilitative settings. Students utilize quantitative and qualitative techniques using kinematic and kinetic methodologies to apply the physics of motion to the human body.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 102; C- or higher in BIOL 230 or BIOL 250

KIN 290, Human Movement Science, 3 Units

This course focuses on the physiological and psychological mechanisms underlying the control and learning of human movement throughout the lifespan. Students will apply theoretical concepts of learning to develop age-appropriate movement programs and measure outcomes through biomechanical examinations.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 220 and BIOL 230 or BIOL 250

KIN 306, Sociological and Psychological Aspects of Physical Activity and Sport, 3 Units

Students explore the sociological and the psychological issues related to physical activity and sport. Special emphasis is on the study of sport in North America and its implications within American society. Topics of study include motivation, goal setting, burnout, anxiety and arousal, aggression and ethics as related to physical activity and sport.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in PSYC 110 or PSYC 290

KIN 360, Nutrition for Exercise and Sport Science, 3 Units

This course focuses on optimal nutrition for exercise and training. Particular attention is given to energy nutrients, minerals, and fluid needs of the physically active. Clinical signs associated with nutrition deficiencies are explored, as are issues related to disordered eating problems among the physically active. The course reviews antioxidant supplementation for physically active people, as well as popular nutritional ergogenic aids. Students become proficient at using current nutrition education tools and evaluating their energy intake and physical activity output using a computerized diet analysis program. Special topics on eating while traveling are also covered.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251

KIN 363, Physiology of Exercise, 4 Units

This course focuses on the effects of exercise on human physiology and bioenergetics. The physiological changes and adaptations that exercise causes in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromuscular, and endocrine systems are investigated in detail, as is the relationship between nutrition, body composition, and exercise. The laboratory component explores the assessment of resting metabolic rate, energy expenditure, body composition, cardio-respiratory function, maximum oxygen uptake, lactate threshold, strength and flexibility, and other physiological responses to exercise.

Special Fee Applies

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251; C- or higher in KIN 290 (or KIN 270 and KIN 275).

KIN 364, Kinesiology, 4 Units

This course examines the structural and functional mechanics of human movement through an in-depth study of kinesiological principles. Techniques of posture and gait evaluation, as well as fundamentals of body mechanics, are covered, along with how to detect and correct basic musculoskeletal anomalies. A laboratory component is included.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251; C- or higher in KIN 290 (or KIN 270 and KIN 275)

KIN 366, Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries, 3 Units

This course presents the methods used in the recognition, evaluation, and care of athletic injuries. Techniques in taping, prevention, and rehabilitation of injuries are studied.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251

KIN 372, Corrective Exercise Strategies, 3 Units

This course provides corrective exercise strategies to prevent or reduce injury and afford optimal tissue recovery in the physically active. Principles of tissue inhibition, lengthening, activation, and human movement integration are explored. Strategies in advanced kinetic chain assessment, flexibility, neuromuscular retraining, and balance and stability exercises are incorporated. In addition, scientific evidence supporting injury prevention programs are discussed. This course provides information to prepare students for professional certifications through the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM).

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 363 and KIN 364

KIN 380, Concepts of Performance Enhancement, 3 Units

This course will examine advanced methods for enhancing human performance. Students will gain a theoretical understanding of the acute and chronic adaptations that occur in response to various anaerobic and aerobic training techniques. Students will also be given the opportunity to gain practical experience developing, implementing, and supervising strength and condition programs for both teams and individual athletes. Areas of emphasis include periodization, movement-based programming, and experience with non-traditional implements. This course is designed to enhance students' current level of knowledge in preparation for the nationally accredited Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) Exam.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 363 and KIN 364

KIN 395, Fitness Management, 3 Units

This course addresses the organizational and administrative aspects of fitness instruction to the physically active. Students study issues such as record keeping, facility design and maintenance, public relations and marketing, and legal and ethical issues related to health care.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in BIOL 231 or BIOL 251, and KIN 242.

KIN 473, Fitness and Exercise Prescription, 4 Units

This course covers the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities that fitness professionals must possess to work with medical and special populations. The course will focus on evaluating health behaviors and risk factors, conducting fitness assessments, constructing appropriate exercise prescriptions, and motivating individuals to modify negative health habits and maintain positive lifestyle behaviors for health promotion.

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 363 and KIN 364

KIN 475, Current Topics in Kinesiology, 2 Units

Students in this course examine advanced principles in exercise and sport science through participation in field and laboratory techniques culminating in a research presentation. Possible topics of exploration include physiological and biomechanical principles of sport performance and injury prevention, sports nutrition, exercise adaptations for various populations, modalities in exercise prescription, and/or corrective exercise strategies.

Prerequisite: KIN 363, KIN 364, and instructor approval.

KIN 478, Senior Preparation in Kinesiology, 2 Units

This course is a culminating seminar for graduating seniors in kinesiology. Strategies for professional growth and development are examined, as well as current issues and future trends related to the variety of professional opportunities in the field of kinesiology.

Corequisites: KIN 490 and senior standing.

KIN 490, Writing 3: Research Methods in Kinesiology, 3 Units

The focus of the course is on the critical reading of kinesiology literature, the interpretation of research, and the analysis of research methodology appropriate in the field. This course is designed to enhance students' abilities to be consumers of research information, participants in the research process, and communicators of research results. Students are required to conduct a research project and write a comprehensive research report, including introduction, literature review, methods, results, discussion, and conclusions. Discussions also focus on current knowledge and future trends in kinesiology, as seen in the literature. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 363, KIN 364, Writing 2

KIN 495, Internship in Exercise Science, 1-4 Units

This course helps students to apply their knowledge, skills, and abilities in a practical setting. Students use an integrated approach to the assessment, development, implementation, and management of exercise and fitness programs under the direction of an approved exercise science professional. Each unit requires 50 clock hours of internship experience. This course may be repeated for credit (2 units are required for the major). Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: C- or higher in KIN 363 and KIN 364

KIN 497, Readings, 1-3 Units

This course is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between, and designed by, a student of upper-division standing and a full-time faculty member. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this course.

Prerequisite: Instructor consent

KIN 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. Each 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill the preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this course.

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and instructor consent.

KIN 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level capstone type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. Each 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in a formal thesis, a published article, or electronic media. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill the preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this course.

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, Writing 3, and instructor consent.

PE 101, Leisure Time Preparation: Badminton, 1 Unit

Students study the individual's physical fitness and recreational needs. Development of skills related to fitness through badminton is combined in the class plan. Does not meet Fitness for Life requirement.

PE 102, Leisure Time Preparation: Golf, 1 Unit

Students study golf as a lifetime recreational activity. Does not meet Fitness for Life requirement.

PE 103, Leisure Time Preparation: Volleyball, 1 Unit

Students study the individual's recreational needs through the development of skills related to volleyball. This class may also be taught on grass. Does not meet Fitness for Life requirement.

PE 104, Leisure Time Preparation: Tennis, 1 Unit

Students study the individual's recreational needs through the development of skills related to tennis. Does not meet Fitness for Life requirement.

PE 105, Outdoor Experience: Camping, 1 Unit

Students study the camping programs available to the public today and survey equipment, sites, and educational opportunities. Practical experience includes two weekend camping expeditions. Does not meet the Fitness for Life requirement.

PE 106, Outdoor Exp: Backpacking, 1 Unit

This course teaches the fundamental principles of backpacking. Topics covered include: equipment selection, outdoor leadership, navigation, safety and emergency procedures, backcountry cooking, trip planning, and Leave No Trace. Practical experience includes one weekend backpacking expedition.

PE 107, Outdoor Experience: Rock Climbing, 1 Unit

This course teaches the fundamental principles of rock climbing. Topics covered include: equipment selection, movement on rock, history of the sport, knots, belaying techniques, basic anchor construction, self-rescue techniques, rating systems and climbing topos, rappelling and Leave No Trace. Practical experience includes 3 day-long rock climbing trips. *This course will NOT include lead climbing techniques.

PE 113, Lifeguard Training, 2 Units

This is a certified, advanced life-saving course of the American Red Cross. This is not a Fitness for Life class. This class does not meet the General Education requirement for University Skills and Requirements.

PE 114, Water Safety Instructor (WSI) Course, 2 Units

This is a certified WSI course of the American Red Cross. This is not a Fitness for Life class. This class does not meet the General Education requirement for University Skills and Requirements.

PE 138, Introduction to Physical Education, 2 Units

This course introduces students interested in careers as physical education teachers to professional dimensions, roles, and responsibilities of physical educators in the 21st century. Students gain an understanding of the physical education profession through assignments, class discussions, on-site school observations, shadowing professionals and some service-learning activities.

PE 237, Methods of Teaching Rhythmic and Multicultural Activities, 3 Units

This course focuses on skill development, teaching methodology, analysis and evaluation of fundamental rhythmic activities, social dance, and global and nontraditional games.

Prerequisite: For Kinesiology with PE Concentration and Liberal Studies with PE Concentration students only.

PE 240, Health Education, 2 Units

This course focuses on the development of the whole-person concept which includes the mental, emotional, social, spiritual, and physical health practices. This integration includes study of such topics as stress, diet, nutrition, communicable and chronic diseases, alcohol and drug abuse, lifestyles, childbirth, physical fitness, and environmental health. To be taken concurrently with a Fitness for Life or varsity sport course.

PE 250, Methods of Teaching Individual Sports, 2 Units

This course focuses on skill development, teaching methodology, analysis and evaluation of fundamental tennis, golf, badminton, and track and field skills.

Prerequisite: For Kinesiology with PE Concentration and Liberal Studies with PE Concentration students only.

PE 251, Methods of Teaching Contemporary Activities, 3 Units

This course focuses on skill development, teaching methodology, analysis and evaluation of contemporary physical education activities, including combatives, cooperative games, outdoor education, swimming and water safety.

Prerequisite: For Kinesiology with PE Concentration and Liberal Studies with PE Concentration students only.

PE 252, Methods of Teaching Team Sports, 3 Units

This course focuses on skill development, teaching methodology, analysis and evaluation of fundamental basketball, soccer, volleyball, softball, and football skills.

Prerequisite: For Kinesiology with PE Concentration and Liberal Studies with PE Concentration students only.

PE 320, History and Principles of Physical Education, 3 Units

The historical and philosophical development of physical education and sport is studied. This course includes discussion of current theories, philosophies, and practices in the profession. The California Framework for Physical Education is examined.

PE 321, Organization and Administration of Physical Education, Athletics, and Recreation, 3 Units

The basic principles of organization, administration, and supervision are stressed with emphasis on topics such as staffing, budget, program organization, purchasing, and management in the individual areas of physical education, athletics, and recreation.

PE 325, Motor Development and Learning, 3 Units

This course is designed to teach motor learning theories and to provide the necessary skills to apply these theories when teaching motor skills. This course will also include the study of locomotor and non-locomotor patterns, manipulative, rhythmical movement patterns and skill development, as they relate to motor learning. These fundamental principles will be analyzed in terms of teaching elementary school children. Required for physical education majors and liberal studies majors with a physical education concentration.

Prerequisite: BIOL 115 or BIOL 250 and BIOL 251. PE or Liberal Studies PE Concentration majors only

PE 364, Kinesiology, 3 Units

The structural and functional mechanics of movement through an in-depth study of kinesiological, corrective, and adaptive principles are analyzed. Techniques of postural evaluation, muscle testing, therapeutic exercises, and fundamentals of body mechanics are coupled with kinesiological principles for the detection and correction of basic neuromusculoskeletal anomalies.

Prerequisite: BIOL 115, or BIOL 250 and BIOL 251.

PE 423, School Health Education, 3 Units

Health issues that the classroom teacher will face are studied. Proper cooperation with medical services, provision of healthful classroom environment, and methods of health instruction are explored.

PE 433, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Football, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching football are studied.

PE 434, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Track and Field, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching track and field are studied.

PE 435, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Basketball, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching basketball are studied.

PE 436, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Baseball, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching baseball are studied.

PE 437, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Volleyball, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching volleyball are studied.

PE 438, Techniques of Coaching Team Sports: Soccer, 2 Units

The theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching soccer are studied.

PE 440, Coaching Theory, 2 Units

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the coaching profession, with the primary goal of developing and enhancing students' knowledge and understanding of concepts and techniques of coaching and their application to achieving important objectives in working with athletes. Coursework combines sport science theory and research with practical knowledge and methods of expert coaches. This course is a prerequisite for PE 474 Coaching Practicum.

Prerequisite: KIN 242, KIN 290, KIN 306, KIN 366, PE 321

PE 450, Physical Education in Elementary Schools, K-6, 3 Units

This course prepares students to teach physical education to children in grades K-6. It uses a development approach and stresses exploratory methods of teaching young children a variety of games, dance, self-testing, movement exploration, lifetime fitness, and health-related fitness activities. The course emphasizes lesson plan development, writing clear objectives, and developing effective classroom management skills.

Prerequisite: EDLS 200 or EDLS 202 or EDLS 300 or EDLS 302, and JR/SR Standing

PE 451, Methods in Physical Education: 7-12, 3 Units

This course provides a classroom and practical teaching experience for the prospective physical educator. Emphasis is on the development of viable unit plans utilizing National Content Standards and California State Content Standards, along with the development of a teaching style effective for the age group and effective in accomplishing stated daily objectives. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: EDLS 200 or EDLS 202 or EDLS 300 or EDLS 302, PE 450, and junior/senior standing

PE 452, Adapted Physical Education, 3 Units

This is an introductory course designed for prospective physical education teachers for the purpose of understanding public laws and developing and modifying programs for the developmentally disabled.

Prerequisite: EDLS 200 or EDLS 202 or EDLS 300 or EDLS 302, PE 450, and junior/senior standing

PE 474, Practicum in Coaching, 2 Units

Students in this application course utilize principles, theories, and practices from PE 440 Coaching Theory. Students shadow, interview, and observe coaches, and apply and critically evaluate practices and procedures of coaching in relation to their own philosophy and understanding of the coaching profession.

Prerequisite: PE 440 (C- or higher)

PE 475, Tests and Measurements in Physical Education and Sports, 3 Units

This course analyzes the measurements of motor behavior and evaluation of physical skills performance. Effectiveness of the program in physical education and exercise science is examined. Basic concepts of statistics are taught along with the introduction of computers as tools to be used in the professional arena.

PE 478, Senior Preparation in Physical Education, 2 Units

This course is designed as a culminating seminar for graduating seniors to discuss, plan, and implement strategies for future professional advancement. Current professional issues, growth, and future trends are examined.

PE 490, Applied Physical Education, 1-3 Units

The course helps prospective physical education teachers obtain a professionally guided experience benefiting them in primary and secondary schools. This course is open to physical education majors only with the program director's approval.

PE 496, Senior Seminar: Ethics in Physical Education and Sport, 3 Units

This course is designed to facilitate the integration of Christian faith and values with careers in physical education and sport. Biblical and theological themes relating to education and sport will provide the basis for discussion of ethical dilemmas facing professionals in these, and related, professions. Students will be challenged to develop personal strategies and philosophies for responding to ethical issues in their chosen careers.

Prerequisite: Senior standing, completion of the majority of the units required for God's Word and the Christian Response, and upper-division writing intensive course

PE 509, Special Topics in Physical Education, 3 Units

Students study specific current topics, trends, technologies, or innovative programs in the field of physical education and sport. The course covers theoretical and practical aspects of issues related to new problems or new possibilities for improving and enhancing teaching and learning within the field of physical education and sport.

PE 551, Curriculum Theory and Design in Physical Education, 3 Units

This course offers a practical study of physical education and athletic programs in the K-12 and collegiate setting including the following: a) philosophy, principles, policies, and procedures, and; b) design, management, and implementation in relation to the State Frameworks and Standards. Special emphasis of the course is on the application of a variety of research and instructional strategies in designing a physical education/athletic curriculum at a chosen educational level.

PE 552, History and Philosophy of Physical Education, 3 Units

This course is designed to explore both the historical and philosophical roots of the discipline. Particular attention is given to the time frame of the Antebellum Period to the present day structure of the profession. Philosophy fashions physical education and sport, thus a strong emphasis of different philosophies and their impact on the discipline are examined.

PE 555, Sociological and Ethical Issues in Sport, 3 Units

This course pursues a study of the evolution of sports and its role in American culture. Course topics include sports as a social phenomenon in American culture and ethical issues within the sporting context, including moral reasoning, moral obligation, and fair play in sport. Class topics assist students in evaluating and reinforcing their personal morals, values, and principles as they relate to their professional field.

PE 556, Facility and Event Management, 3 Units

This course will present students with an overview of the design, operations and management of sports facilities and associated special events (both traditional and non-traditional). This course will also provide students with an understanding of managing sports facilities for the community, high school, collegiate, Olympic, and professional levels. Traditional events, non-traditional events, and extreme sports events will be viewed and analyzed.

PE 557A, Field Studies/Internships in Sport Management, 2 Units

This fieldwork course enables students to apply their knowledge, skills, and abilities in a practical setting. The sport industry is one that is a hands-on, applied industry. As such, one of the most crucial dimensions of any successful sport management degree program is its associated practical/experiential learning opportunities.The goal of the APU Sport Management internship course is to provide students with pre-professional, practical experience within a sport management setting. Students will learn under the direction and supervision of an approved sport management professional. Each units requires 33.3 clock hours of internship experience. This course requires students to complete 100 internship hours in a managed sport setting.

Prerequisite: Completion of all other MS in Physical Education/sport management and integrated leadership coursework except for PE 584 and PE 589 which can be completed concurrently.

PE 557B, Field Studies/Internships in Sport Management, 1 Unit

This fieldwork course enables students to apply their knowledge, skills, and abilities in a practical setting. The sport industry is one that is a hands-on, applied industry. As such, one of the most crucial dimensions of any successful sport management degree program is its associated practical/experiential learning opportunities.The goal of the APU Sport Management internship course is to provide students with pre-professional, practical experience within a sport management setting. Students will learn under the direction and supervision of an approved sport management professional. Each units requires 33.3 clock hours of internship experience. This course requires students to complete 100 internship hours in a managed sport setting.

PE 558, Sport Finance, 3 Units

This course is a survey examination of principles of economics, budgeting, and finance as it applies to the sport industry.

PE 560, Sports Medicine, 3 Units

This course is designed for physical educators and coaches to examine sports injuries and accidents and become competent in prevention, assessment, treatment, and basic rehabilitation techniques.

PE 565, Athletics and the Law, 3 Units

This course includes current legal issues confronting the sport industry and enables coaches, athletic directors, fitness experts, and physical educators to develop risk-management strategies that will assist them in setting guidelines, policies, plans, and procedures.

PE 570, Leadership and Administration of Physical Education and Athletic Programs, 3 Units

This course includes a discussion of management theories, philosophy, program development, operations, budgeting, fundraising, personnel, and staff development for the administration of physical education and athletic programs. Students identify and analyze problems unique to the physical education and athletic professions and implement realistic, objective, and workable action plans.

PE 572, Foundations of Sport Management, 3 Units

This course is an overview of multiple areas relating to sport management. This includes: 1) careers and professional perspective; 2) history of sport management; 3) concepts of communication, leadership and management; 4) athletic governance in the K-12, Jr College/ College and University setting; 5) community, youth and professional sport management; and, 6) marketing and sport tourism.

PE 575, Advanced Principles of Physical Conditioning, 3 Units

This course is designed for physical educators, coaches, athletic trainers, and fitness experts to understand and apply the concepts of cardiovascular exercise, muscular strength, flexibility, nutrition, and body weight as it relates to physical education and athletics.

PE 578, Sport Psychology, 3 Units

This course allows the student to examine psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior. The student is introduced to a broad overview of the major topics in the area with opportunity for research, writing, application, and reflection.

PE 580, Wellness and Fitness for Life, 3 Units

This course is designed for the candidate to understand, practice, and teach the physical, emotional, intellectual, occupational, environmental, social, and spiritual components of health and wellness.

PE 582, Seminar in Professional Literature in Physical Education and Sport, 3 Units

This course pursues a study of literature in physical education and sport and includes various topics and current issues related to the changing profession. The student learns to access APU's online library to retrieve reputable sources in physical education and sport and to research and write using APA standards. The student also engages in critical thinking and reflection exercises with application to physical education and sport.

PE 584, Assessment, Technology, and Evaluation in Physical Education, 3 Units

This course gives physical education and exercise science practitioners theoretical and practical knowledge in assessment, technology, and evaluation techniques. Assessment tools are introduced and practiced, including basic statistical concepts, computer/technology applications, and validity/reliability theories. This course allows each student to master and apply the essential content, principles, and concepts necessary to become an effective evaluator in physical education and exercise science. Students complete chapters 1-3 in PE 584, and chapters 4-5 and capstone defense in PE 589.

PE 589, Physical Education and Exercise Science Capstone, 3 Units

This advanced course enables physical educators to become more informed consumers and designers of educational research with the planning and implementation of classroom or site-based inquiry. Through integrated research activities, educators, coaches, and exercise science professionals locate, value, select, and appropriately apply educational research. A variety of descriptive data, as well as qualitative and quantitative methods of data gathering, are analyzed resulting in an extensive research project.

Prerequisite: PE 584

PE 597, Structural Kinesiology, 3 Units

This course introduces students to structural kinesiology through an explanation of human movement and human anatomy. Fundamentals of body mechanics are coupled with kinesiological principles for the detection and correction of basic neuromusculoskeletal anomalies.

PE 598, Motor Learning, Development, and Control, 3 Units

This course includes discussion of the relationship between motor development and motor learning and provides a framework for establishing programs that facilitate skill acquisition for learners of all ages. It includes an examination of the development of movement skill in humans from infancy to older adulthood and how differing motor, cognitive, and social abilities affect the learning process of motor skills.

PE 599, Readings in Physical Education, 1-3 Units

This course is an independent study, arranged with a faculty member of the physical education staff.

PE 600, Physical Education Teaching Methods for Individuals with Mild to Moderate Disabilities, 3 Units

Students in this course learn techniques for the development and implementation of physical education programs for individuals with mild to moderate disabilities, which include minor to moderate health impairments, intellectual disabilities, and emotional disturbances. Observation of one mild/moderate adapted physical education class is included.

Prerequisite: PE 452

PE 602, Physical Education Teaching Methods for Individuals with Severe to Profound Disabilities, 3 Units

Students in this course learn techniques for the development and implementation of physical education programs for individuals with severe to profound disabilities, which include severe to profound health impairments, intellectual disabilities, and emotional disturbances. Observation of one severe/profound adapted physical education class is included.

Prerequisite: PE 452

PE 604, Motor Assessment for Students Living with Disabilities, 3 Units

Students in this course learn techniques for the evaluation and diagnosis of current motor ability levels of individuals with disabilities. Topics include assessment methods and the development and implementation of Individual Education Plans (IEPs) in accordance with state physical education standards.

Prerequisite: PE 600, PE 602, and anatomy and physiology

PE 605, Management of Adapted Physical Education Programs, 3 Units

This course prepares adapted physical education specialists to manage adapted PE programs. Topics include modifying traditional PE curricula, performing in-services with the use of technology, understanding service delivery models, understanding the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and collaborating with other direct service providers.

Prerequisite: PE 452

PE 606A, Field Experience in Adapted Physical Education, 1 Unit

This is the first fieldwork course for adapted physical education authorization candidates, and is for students who hold a current teaching credential. The course includes 35 hours of supervised practice in teaching individuals with disabilities in small to large groups in public or private agencies or schools.

Prerequisite: PE 600, PE 602, PE 604 and PE 605

PE 606B, Field Experience in Adapted Physical Education, 2 Units

This is the second field experience course for adapted physical education authorization candidates, and is for students who hold a current teaching credential. The course includes 35 hours of supervised practice in teaching individuals with disabilities in small to large groups in public or private agencies or schools.

Prerequisite: PE 600, PE 602, PE 604 and PE 605

Faculty

Department Chair; Director, Kinesiology Program

Eric Sorenson, Ph.D., ATC

Director, M.S. in Athletic Training Program

Jennifer Livingston, Ph.D., ATC

Director, Physical Education Program

Cindy Tanis, Ph.D., ATC

Professors

Sue Hebel, Ed.D., ATC

Jennifer Livingston, Ph.D., ATC

Cynthia McKnight, Ph.D., ATC

Associate Professors

Andrew Alstot, Ph.D.

Sharon Lehman, Ed.D.

Paul Saville, Ph.D., CSCS

Christopher Schmidt, Ph.D., ATC

Eric Sorenson, Ph.D., ATC

Cindy Tanis, Ph.D., ATC

William “Jody” Wilkinson, MD

Assistant Professors

Gregory Bellinder, M.S.

Joshua Dexheimer, Ph.D., CSCS

Andrea Du Bois, Ph.D.

Robert Dudley, Ph.D. (Cand.)

Christy Gendron, DAT, ATC

Angela Robles, Ed.D.