Department of Clinical Psychology

Students find plenty of space for studying and good conversation at the outdoor amphitheater behind the Wynn Academic Center on APU’s East Campus.

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PPSY 700C, Psychopathology, 3 Units

This course reviews the role and categories of psychopathology utilized in the assessment and treatment of individual, marriage and family dysfunction. Students develop their diagnostic and analytical skills through a mastery of the concepts in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). This course is taken during the first year of the doctoral program and is foundational to the curriculum. As such, subsequent coursework builds upon the knowledge, concepts, and skills introduced in this course.

PPSY 700D, Introduction to Clinical Practice: Basic Skills, 3 Units

This course provides students with an introduction to the skill and the art of psychotherapy. The course incorporates didactic instruction, experiential learning, readings, and reflection in order to meet this course objective. This course is taken during the first year of the doctoral program and is foundational to the curriculum. As such, subsequent coursework builds upon the knowledge, concepts, and skills introduced in this course.

PPSY 700E, Advanced Developmental Psychology I: Infancy through Adolescence, 2 Units

This course is part of a two-course sequence that helps students learn to utilize a life-span perspective in their work as clinical psychologists. This course reviews important developmental issues and milestones from infancy through adolescence, paying particular attention to context, culture, and environmental issues. Students are encouraged to consider how development occurs within a specific social context and learn how social stress, poverty, low education attainment, abuse and neglect, and inadequate housing impact development. Biological, social, and psychological aspects of development are included; models of psychological development are presented; and the processes of change and adaptation are examined, including clinical issues such as grief and loss. Clinical application of the material is highlighted through case examples, group discussion, and hands-on application during class activities. This course is taken during the first year of the Psy.D. program and is foundational to the curriculum; as such, subsequent coursework builds upon the knowledge, concepts, and skills introduced in this course.

PPSY 700F, Diversity I: Multiculturally Responsive Attitudes and Knowledge, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction and overview to Multicultural Responsiveness within the context of the psychotherapeutic relationship and through the development of the counselor/therapist. Self-awareness of one's own cultural values and biases, awareness of the patient's worldview, and the application of culturally appropriate intervention strategies are all emphasized. This course will address the cultural dimensions of race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, mental/physical disabilities, and religion/spirituality. The course will combine didactic and experiential elements of instruction in order to promote student growth and professional development regarding cultural diversity and the practice of psychotherapy.

PPSY 700H, Assessment I, 3 Units

This course gives students a broad understanding of the psychometric principles related to psychological assessment. This course is the first in a sequence of assessment courses that are continued in the doctoral program, and, therefore, has specific emphases necessary to provide a foundation for a psychologist's knowledge base in assessment. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the science of psychological assessment, including an introduction to descriptive statistics, reliability, validity, and item analysis. Structuring a basic assessment battery, conducting clinical interviews and the use of psychological tests in diverse contexts is also addressed. This course is taken during the first year of the doctoral program and is foundational to the curriculum. As such, subsequent coursework builds upon the knowledge, concepts, and skills introduced in this course.

PPSY 700I, Systems II: Family Therapy, 3 Units

This course consists of an overview of current theories and methods of family intervention. The systems approach is emphasized, though psychodynamic and communication concepts in the interpersonal field are also included. The major theorists in each system are identified and their techniques demonstrated.

Prerequisite: PPSY 711

PPSY 700J, Introduction to Clinical Skills: Advanced Skills, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to the clinical world of the psychologist. A review of basic clinical skills is provided, with an emphasis on developing and refining the skills related to the relationship between clinician and client-respect, warmth, genuineness, empathy, concreteness, potency, self-disclosure, confrontation, and immediacy. Work in small groups gives students an opportunity to role play and receive feedback concerning their skills. This course is taken during the first year of the doctoral program and is foundational to the curriculum; as such, subsequent coursework builds upon the knowledge, concepts, and skills introduced in this course.

Prerequisite: PPSY 700D

PPSY 701, Introduction to Clinical Practicum and Professional Practice, 2 Units

This course provides a further introduction to the field of clinical psychology. Students practice basic skills in assessment, interviewing, and sensitivity to diversity, with a special focus on case conceptualization. Activities include role playing and videotaping of clinical practice. Additional exploration of ethical issues in the practice of clinical psychology is also included.

PPSY 701A, Clinical Practicum and Professional Practice, 2 Units

This course is a companion course to PPSY 701, Introduction to Clinical Practicum, to assist students during their first year of practicum and beyond. The foundational skills of the relationship competence are further expanded and developed. During the second semester of the course, students expand on learning from the first semester, now taking what they have learned and applying it to clinical case work. An expansion of basic skills is the focus, including: rapport-building; case conceptualization; making preliminary and informed diagnoses; use of therapeutic interventions; how to use clinical supervision; and how to attend to legal and ethical issues in the therapy room. Students learn how to apply theoretical orientation models to clinical work and develop the skills of treatment planning and theoretical case conceptualization. A continued emphasis on diversity and ethics underlies the core curriculum. This course focuses heavily on experimental learning, with active engagement with core material. This may include role plays, guided class discussions, growth in knowledge of the self, videotaping and review of videotapes of clients, and other classroom and homework activities designed to enhance student learning.

Prerequisite: PPSY 701

PPSY 702, Legal and Ethical Competence for Psychologists, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct and laws relevant to the practice of psychology. Students must pass a competency examination on legal and ethical issues, practice basic clinical skills, and have their clinical work reviewed.

PPSY 703, Psychological Theories: Psychoanalytic/Psychodynamic, 2 Units

Using primary and secondary sources, this survey course provides an overview of the history of psychoanalytic thought from Freud to the present. Prominent theorists and movements within psychoanalytic history will be featured, with an emphasis on central concepts such as: key theoretical concepts, theory of development, philosophy/structure of mind, theory of psychopathology, theory of treatment/change. Empirical support for the efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy will be presented. Key movements in the consideration of religion and spirituality within psychoanalysis will also be discussed.

PPSY 705, Psychological Theories: Group, 2 Units

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of group psychotherapy. Students explore several prominent group therapy models and develop some clinical competency in group therapy.

PPSY 706, Psychological Theories: Postmodern, 2 Units

This course provides an overview of postmodern theories that are prominent in the field of clinical psychology. Course material covers the theoretical and research underpinnings of specific models, along with their relationship to language, human interaction, and social constructivism; the various schools of thought associated with the discipline since its inception; and the influence and impact of each of these schools on the practice of psychology. Models covered include narrative therapy, solution-focused therapy, feminist therapy, and multicultural therapy, and students explore the subject matter through lectures, readings, discussions, and videos.

PPSY 707, Clinical Interventions: Psychodynamic, 2 Units

Students in this course learn an empirically supported model of time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy. This course includes conceptual/theoretical underpinnings as well as clinical application, and ideally, students are already in a clinical setting where this modality may be utilized. Consultation on cases is provided to students in this course.

PPSY 708, Clinical Interventions: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, 2 Units

This course provides an overview of interventions related to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Students learn conceptual foundations and interventions of CBT theory in order to modify thought patterns, affective states, and behaviors as related to specific disorders and clinical populations. Students also develop a basic understanding of the efficacy of CBT as a psychotherapeutic treatment modality. Interventions are taught through in-class written assignments, by engaging in role-plays, and by observing sessions.

PPSY 709, Clinical Interventions: Group, 2 Units

This course provides an introduction to the practice of group psychotherapy. Students explore several prominent group therapy models and begin to develop clinical competency in group therapy.

Prerequisite: PPSY 705

PPSY 710, Clinical Interventions: Postmodern, 2 Units

In this course, students learn conceptual, perceptual, and executive skills of postmodern interventions, including solution-focused brief therapy. Students develop a better understanding of how postmodern interventions enhance the treatment of clients.

PPSY 711, Psychology and Systems Theory, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of Family Psychology and the theoretical orientation of the Psy.D. curriculum. An in-depth analysis of the tenets of systems theory and their application to psychotherapy is provided. Philosophical, theological, and psychological ramifications of systems theory are considered. Students are challenged to adopt an ecological systems epistemology and think critically regarding the integration of psychological theories within a systemic framework.

PPSY 714, Assessment III: Cognitive Assessment, 4 Units

This course covers the assessment of intelligence in children, adolescents, and adults and the assessment of children for developmental, learning, and emotional disorders. The course emphasizes the Wechsler intelligence scales. Critical analysis of cultural considerations in test interpretation is considered. The development and composition of comprehensive assessment batteries are addressed. This course includes a mandatory lab for practice in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of assessment devices.

PPSY 714A, Cognitive Assessment Lab, 1 Unit

This course covers the administration and scoring of intelligence assessment measures for children, adolescents, and adults. The course emphasizes the Wechsler intelligence scales.

PPSY 716, Family Psychology, 3 Units

This course examines family development, the assessment of family functioning, the intersection of psychopathology and family dynamics, and family psychotherapy. Students learn to administer and interpret family assessment measures. The role of culture, ethnicity, and religious influences in families is discussed. Students develop systemic treatment plans that recognize the value of the appropriate inclusion of individual, dyadic, and family therapy sessions.

PPSY 718, History and Systems of Psychology, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of the history of the discipline of psychology. Topics covered include the theoretical and research underpinnings of the discipline; the various schools of thought associated with the discipline since its inception; and the influence and impact of each of these schools upon the practice of psychology. Students explore the subject matter through lecture, readings, discussion, and videos.

PPSY 719, Social Psychology, 2 Units

The course provides an overview of the theoretical and applied knowledge of social psychology, which consists of how individuals affect their environment, and how the environment affects individual behavior and social interactions. The focus is on theory and empirical research which supports theory. In addition, classic action-oriented social psychology is examined in the application of social psychological theory to real-life situations.

PPSY 720, Clinical Consultation, 1 Unit

This course offers additional support to Psy.D. students' clinical placement and supervision experiences as they receive clinical training at practicum sites. The primary purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to discuss their clinical caseload in order to further develop their case conceptualization and presentation skills. Furthermore, the class provides an opportunity for faculty to encourage professional development and provide department oversight of students' clinical placement experience. This course is required every semester students are at a practicum site, and successful completion of the practicum is required to receive credit for this course.

Corequisite: Clinical training at a practicum site

PPSY 722, Research Design I, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to research design and its application to psychology. Emphasis is given to developing knowledge and skills in research design, and in assessing the technical adequacy of research conducted by others. Various types of clinical dissertations are presented and discussed to assist students in developing their clinical dissertation proposal.

PPSY 723, Research Design II, 3 Units

This course focuses on statistical methodologies and their applications in the analysis of both empirical and qualitative data. Lectures emphasize statistical concepts and their application to clinical research. Computer applications of statistical software packages are emphasized in an experiential laboratory component. This course provides the foundational skills necessary for students to finalize their clinical dissertation proposal and to conduct the research to complete their clinical dissertation.

PPSY 724, Systems IV: Couples Theory and Therapy, 3 Units

This course reviews the current literature on dyadic relationships and psychotherapeutic approaches to couples. A minimum of three contemporary theoretical orientations and their clinical applications are studied in depth. Demonstration, simulation, case presentations, and clinical experience are used to reinforce the models presented. Students receive training in the administration and interpretation of assessment devices for the clinical evaluation of couples. Variations across cultures and interaction with wider systems are considered.

PPSY 730, Cognition, 2 Units

This course studies current information on cognition and cognitive processes. The relationship of contemporary understandings of cognition to the practice of psychotherapy is considered.

PPSY 730A, Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior, 3 Units

This course provides foundational knowledge of cognitive and affective bases of behavior. Topics such as affect, mood, emotion, learning, memory, thought processes, and decision-making are covered. The relationship of contemporary understandings of affect and cognition to the practice of psychotherapy is also considered.

PPSY 731, Dissertation Development, 1 Unit

This course provides advanced instruction in the development of the Psy.D. dissertation. Students participate in the section of the course that addresses the category they have chosen for their dissertation (e.g., qualitative research, quantitative research, program consultation, critical literature analysis, theoretical development, or clinical application).

PPSY 732, Child and Adolescent Psychology, 3 Units

This course is designed to give students a broad understanding of clinical child and adolescent psychology. This course will mainly emphasize diagnosis and treatment of common childhood and adolescent psychiatric disorders. This course will utilize a developmental psychopathology model; therefore, both protective factors and risk factors for children and adolescent mental health will be covered. The course will highlight empirically validated treatments in work with children and adolescents; however, general treatment approaches will also be discussed.

PPSY 734, Gerontology, 2 Units

This course focuses on the specific developmental issues, psychopathology, and therapeutic interventions relevant to the aging. Special attention is given to ecosystemic factors, such as extended family dynamics and community services, as they relate to treatment. Differences across cultures are considered.

PPSY 735, Adolescent Psychology, 2 Units

This course covers current perspectives on adolescent development, psychopathology, and psychotherapy. Traditional and recent models of adolescent development are reviewed. DSM-IV criteria for disorders that relate especially to adolescents are reviewed and therapeutic interventions studied. Special attention is given to models that recognize systemic factors in the etiology and treatment of adolescent issues. Students learn to administer and interpret at least one assessment device for adolescents (e.g., MMPI-A, MACI).

PPSY 739, Psychobiology, 3 Units

This course introduces the biological and neurological bases of human behavior. The role of the central nervous system and organic bases of psychological development and psychopathology are examined. The effects of trauma, head injury, and the neurological aspects of DSM-IV disorders are discussed.

PPSY 740, Consultation in Clinical Psychology, 2 Units

This course provides instruction and training in the provision of professional clinical consultation. Students are introduced to the theoretical and practical aspects of providing consultation.

PPSY 742, Diversity II: Historical and Current Causes of Systemic Differences and Oppression, 3 Units

This course examines the historical legacy, events, and circumstances that have led to structural and systemic policies that have advantaged certain populations and people groups over others in the United States. As the second in a sequence of four diversity courses, the focus of this course is upon equipping students to understand the impact of historical events on their clients' lives and learning how to consider the historical context in psychotherapy.

Prerequisite: PPSY 700F

PPSY 743, Diversity III: Responsiveness in Clinical Practice, 3 Units

This course builds on previous PPSY diversity courses, emphasizing application of diversity concepts. It provides a review of and expansion upon key concepts and essential elements, as well as an introduction to some other aspects of multicultural counseling/therapy competency (MCT). The course also provides an on-campus forum for the review and integration of multicultural competence concepts in clinical practice at a practicum site chosen as part of each student's individual training plan. Course material focuses on MCT competency in the delivery of psychological services to diverse populations, as students must pass an integrative MCT competency evaluation to complete this course, and are evaluated on the development in increased MCT skill in the practice of psychology through a final integrative paper.

PPSY 744, Supervision in Clinical Psychology, 2 Units

This course provides instruction and training in the provision of professional clinical supervision. Students are introduced to the theoretical and practical aspects of providing supervision. In addition to lectures and readings focused on the process of supervision, students are supervised as they provide supervision to master's-level trainees.

PPSY 745, Dissertation I, 1 Unit

Students enroll for dissertation credit while they work with their committees on their clinical dissertation. Specific goals, objectives, and tasks must be completed to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward completion of the dissertation. Documents demonstrating completion of the assignments must be submitted to the Department of Graduate Psychology in order to receive credit for the course.

PPSY 746, Dissertation II, 1 Unit

Students enroll for dissertation credit while they work with their committees on their Clinical Dissertation. Specific goals, objectives, and tasks must be completed to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward completion of the dissertation. Documents demonstrating completion of the assignments must be submitted to the Department of Graduate Psychology in order to receive credit for the course.

PPSY 747, Dissertation III, 1 Unit

Students enroll for dissertation credit while they work with their committees on their Clinical Dissertation. Specific goals, objectives, and tasks must be completed to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward completion of the dissertation. Documents demonstrating completion of the assignments must be submitted to the Department of Graduate Psychology in order to receive credit for the course.

PPSY 748, Dissertation IV, 1 Unit

Students enroll for dissertation credit while they work with their committees on their clinical dissertation. Specific goals, objectives, and tasks must be completed to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward completion of the dissertation. Documents demonstrating completion of the assignments must be submitted to the Department of Graduate Psychology in order to receive credit for the course.

PPSY 749, Diversity IV: Global Psychology, 3 Units

This course focuses on the role of the psychologist in international contexts. Specifically, this course addresses awareness, knowledge, skills, and attitudes in working with religiously diverse populations. Furthermore, this course addresses the role of the psychologist working internationally. To this end, this course provides an overview of Global Psychology, International Psychology, global mental health, and other related movements. Critical analysis of current practices in psychological research and clinical intervention is discussed, and students identify how they will apply course content to their future professional roles.

PPSY 752, Predoctoral Internship, 0 Units

This is a one-year professional internship at an external site approved by the director of clinical training of internship. Students register for this course during the fall, spring, and summer semesters while on internship.

Prerequisite: Completion of all Psy.D. curriculum and practicum requirements; pass the Clinical Competency Exam; and approval to apply for internship by director. Students who opt to take a two-year half-time internship must register for this course both years.

PPSY 755, Dissertation V, 1 Unit

Students enroll for dissertation credit while they work with their committees on their clinical dissertation. Specific goals, objectives, and tasks must be completed to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward completion of the dissertation. Documents demonstrating completion of the assignments must be submitted to the Department of Graduate Psychology in order to receive credit for the course.

PPSY 756, Dissertation VI, 1 Unit

Students enroll for dissertation credit while they work with their committees on their clinical dissertation. Specific goals, objectives, and tasks must be completed to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward completion of the dissertation. Documents demonstrating completion of the assignments must be submitted to the Department of Graduate Psychology in order to receive credit for the course.

PPSY 757, Psychopharmacology, 2 Units

This course introduces the use of psychotropic medications as an adjunctive therapy to psychotherapy. Current information on the use of medications in the treatment of psychological disorders is provided. Consideration is given to the special needs of certain populations (e.g., the elderly or substance abuse patients) when psychotropic medications are prescribed. Students develop skills in case management when referral to physicians or neuropsychologists is part of therapeutic practice.

PPSY 763, Psychodynamic Systems of Psychotherapy I, 2 Units

This seminar-style course is the first in a three-course sequence on psychodynamic systems of psychotherapy, which provides instruction and training in psychodynamic approaches to personality, psychopathology, and psychotherapy. This first course includes a review of major theorists and theories from Freud (classical analysis) to Kohut (self-psychology), focusing particularly on the British Middle School's (Fairbairn, Guntrip, and Winnicott) distinctive contributions to this spectrum of theories and therapies. Particular attention is given to the evolution from drive to relationship as primary motivation for human development and from individual to interpersonal intrapsychic systems frameworks. Implications for the understanding of religious experience from the perspective of these psychodynamic frameworks is also explored.

PPSY 764, Psychodynamic Systems of Psychotherapy II, 2 Units

This seminar-style course is the second part of a three-course sequence, following the review of the British Middle School's unique contributions to theory and technique, and elaborates upon the distinction between one-person, two-person, and contextual psychotherapies. This course provides advanced instruction and training in contemporary psychodynamic approaches to personality and psychotherapy and highlights the systemic theory that undergirds their development. An in-depth exploration of relational psychoanalysis that diverges from traditional psychoanalytic assumptions by considering contextual daily interactions and broader social and cultural dynamics, is presented. Extensive clinical material is used to illustrate how relational thinking explores the interface between mother-infant research, dynamic systems theory, trauma research, family therapy, and social learning theory, all of which are powerfully contextual in nature. In addition, implications for understanding spirituality from within this tradition are considered.

Prerequisite: PPSY 763

PPSY 765, Psychodynamic Systems of Psychotherapy III, 2 Units

This seminar-style course is the third in a three-course sequence on psychodynamic systems of psychotherapy, which provides instruction and training in psychodynamic approaches to personality, psychopathology, and psychotherapy. This third course focuses on synthesis and consolidation of understanding regarding the spectrum of psychodynamic theories and therapies with particular attention to demonstrated clinical competency, and pays particular attention to how psychodynamic theory interfaces with social issues, life transitions, faith, and film and literature.

Prerequisite: PPSY 764

PPSY 766, Consultation II: Systemic and Organizational Context, 2 Units

This course explores the critical dimensions of organizational life from the vantage point of systemic, structural, and cultural perspectives. Students examine organizing principles for leadership and management, cultural artifacts of organizational life, and key contextual variables that might prove significant for consultancy engagement. This course provides a framework for students to gain insights into organizational life and the importance of key factors as a backdrop for consultancy engagements that involve organizational redesign, management principles, and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: PPSY 740

PPSY 767, Consultation III: Leadership and Organizational Assessment, 2 Units

This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative assessment methods as key tools for leadership and organizational assessment. Students gain competency in the use of several key assessment methods and instruments, learn the importance of assessment in organizational and leadership dynamics, and learn to apply these instruments to leadership and organizational development.

Prerequisite: PPSY 740, PPSY 766

PPSY 768, Consultation IV: Interventional Strategies, 2 Units

This course provides instruction and training in interventional strategies central to consultation assignments within organizational settings. Students are introduced to interventional strategies that correspond to the primary issues related to organizational life: change management, organizational culture, and leadership and team dynamics. Students gain competency in focusing on these critical areas of consultancy engagement and intervention.

Prerequisite: PPSY 740, PPSY 766, PPSY 767

PPSY 770, Introduction to Forensic Psychology, 2 Units

This course provides the clinical psychology student an introduction to forensic psychology theory, methods, and assessment. This is the first and foundational course in a series of four elective courses in the family forensic psychology elective concentration. This course provides students with the opportunity to learn the foundational theory in law and psychology that serves as prerequisite knowledge to explore deeper study in forensic assessment and family forensic psychology. Specifically, this course covers the introduction to the psychological and legal aspects of criminal, civil, and family forensic psychology.

PPSY 771, Forensic Assessment, 2 Units

This course provides substantive coverage of forensic mental health assessment. It presents the psychological and legal conceptual framework for applying forensic instruments and forensically relevant instruments to answer questions presented by a civil, family, or criminal court. Foundational issues such as forensic ethics, multicultural considerations, basic forensic assessment methodology, and assessment of response styles and dissimulation are covered. In addition, relevant legal concepts and landmark cases that substantially shape the delivery of forensic mental health assessment are addressed. Students learn the basics of conducting the following evaluation types: 1) competency to stand trial; 2) mental status at the time of the offense and criminal responsibility; 3) violence risk management; 4) sex offender risk assessment; 5) death penalty mitigation; and 6) personal injury.

Prerequisite: PPSY 770

PPSY 772, Family Forensic Psychology I, 2 Units

This course provides a substantive overview of juvenile forensic and child custody evaluations. Students have the opportunity to learn legal cases and principles that apply to the work of forensic psychologists in juvenile and family courts, as well as assessment methodology and instruments that are employed when conducting juvenile forensic and child custody evaluations. Types of the evaluations covered include juvenile risk assessment, juvenile psychopathy, juvenile transfer waiver, juvenile competency, child custody, and fitness for parenting.

Prerequisite: PPSY 771

PPSY 773, Family Forensic Psychology II, 2 Units

This course covers specialized issues within family forensic psychology including conducting evaluations that are useful for making legal dispositions within the family court system. Students learn the fundamental elements of conducting the following assessments: visitation risk, child trauma, child sexual abuse allegations, domestic violence risk, battered spouse, decisional/testamentary capacity and substituted judgement, psychological autopsies, and reproductive capacity. In addition, students are exposed to divorce mediation and more advanced expert testimony strategies. At the end of the four-course sequence, students have the opportunity to participate in a mock court hearing where they present their findings and undergo cross-examination by an attorney.

Prerequisite: PPSY 772

PPSY 774, Assessment II: Personality, 3 Units

This course provides a review of the fundamentals of psychological assessment: the administration, scoring, and interpretation of self-report instruments for the clinical assessment of personality and professional report writing. Primary instruments studied will include the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), MMPI-2-RF, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory IV, Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI), NEO-Personality Inventory-3 (NEO-PI-3), Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) and Beck Inventories.

Prerequisite: PPSY 700H

PPSY 775, Assessment IV: Integrated Report Writing, 3 Units

This course focuses on the art and science of psychological assessment and report writing. Consistent with the assessment competence of the APA, this course is intended as a capstone or final, culminating course occurring at the conclusion of the assessment sequence. It provides students with the tools to refine report-writing skills, with a focus on conducting clinical interviewing, test selection, and third-party collaborative interviews, and learning to write integrated, clear, useful psychological reports.

Prerequisite: PPSY 700H, PPSY 774, PPSY 714

PPSY 779, Advanced Developmental Psychology II: Early Adulthood through Late Adulthood, 2 Units

This course is part of a two course sequence that aims to help students learn to utilize a lifespan perspective in their work as clinical psychologists. This course reviews important developmental issues and milestones from early adulthood through late adulthood, paying particular attention to context, culture, and environmental issues. Students are encouraged to consider how development occurs within a specific social context and learn how social stress, poverty, low-education attainment, abuse and neglect, and inadequate housing impact development. Biological, social, psychological aspects of development are included in this course. Models of psychological development are presented, and the processes of change and adaptation are examined, including clinical issues such as grief and loss. The clinical application of the material is highlighted through case examples, group discussion, and hands-on application during class activities. This course is taken during the first year of the doctoral program and is foundational to the curriculum. As such, subsequent coursework builds upon the knowledge, concepts, and skills introduced in this course.

PPSY 781, Interpersonal Theory and Psychotherapy, 2 Units

This course provides advanced instruction and training in interpersonal approaches to personality and psychotherapy. This seminar-style course includes a review of Harry Stack Sullivan's distinctive contributions to personality theory, the primary interpersonal models of personality, and several contemporary clinical applications of this theory.

PPSY 786, Global Psychology, 2 Units

This course provides a systematic overview of existing approaches to working globally. Theory, research, and intervention are highlighted, and the history of globalization, current trends, and common problems and issues are examined. Students are encouraged to develop their clinical skills in applying psychology to significant global concerns in diverse countries and cultures and practically apply their knowledge during an intensive, three-week practicum in Kenya, East Africa.

PPSY 787, Dissertation Continuation, 0 Units

This course is for students who have have completed Dissertation I-VI and have not yet defended their dissertation. Students are expected to meet regularly with their dissertation chair; to complete specific goals, objectives, and tasks; and to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward completion of their dissertation. Students (including those who have not yet completed their dissertation after proceeding to internship and/or completing internship) enroll in this course until the dissertation is successfully defended and the final document is submitted for the required APA editing process and APU's publications approval.

Prerequisite: PPSY745, PPSY 746, PPSY 747, PPSY 748, PPSY 755, PPSY 756

PPSY 788, Integrated Health Psychology, 2 Units

In this course students are introduced to the field of integrated health psychology, learn the role and duties of a health psychologist, and develop an understanding of the collaboration that can occur will allied health professionals in order to help patients achieve better outcomes.

PPSY 789, Integration I: Traditioning and Contextualizing the Self [Proposed], 3 Units

This course presents theological anthropology as an interpretive lens for the meaning of the human story and the ways in which particular religious and/or spiritual tradition influences our understanding of human experience. Central to this course is an understanding of each student's theology of change - how we understand the source of pain, suffering, illness, and the nature and process of change. Students will explore how their own theological, spiritual, and philosophical tradition(s), implicit or explicit, inform and influence their understanding of human nature, development, illness, health, and change. This self exploration and awareness, reflection on, and interaction with theological and spiritual traditions forms a foundation for understanding the self in context - embodied and embedded culturally, ethnically, religiously - as well as providing a source of personal and professional identity.

PPSY 790, Integration II: Christian Spiritual Formation and Psychotherapy [Proposed], 3 Units

This course will provide an historical overview of Christian Spirituality, which is understood as ways of expressing devotion to God. As background for discussion of Christian Spiritual Formation, a holistic philosophical/theological model of persons will be presented along with an overview of spiritual disciplines as methods utilized to actively engage the Christian formation process. Examples of psychotherapy models that integrate Christian theology, spirituality with existing psychology theoretical and clinical models will be presented and discussed. Opportunities for synthesis, application, and creative development of ideas are all part of the course content and process.

PPSY 791, Integration III: World Religions/Spirituality and Psychotherapy [Proposed], 3 Units

This course focuses on the role of the psychologist considering the religious diversity nationally and globally. With professional ethics and the psychology of religion as foundation, students will explore the application of psychological theory and methodology to the conceptualization, diagnosis, care, and treatment of individuals, couples, and families - the religious and irreligious. Students will gain key competencies related to awareness, knowledge, and skills and will explore their own attitudes in working with religiously diverse populations.

PPSY 792, Integration IV: Vocation and Social Action as a Psychologist [Proposed], 3 Units

As the final course in the integration sequence, this course explores the role of the psychologist as an agent of change in society. Central to this consideration is clinical practice as vocation and the inherently sacred nature of work. Drawing on students' own theological, spiritual, and/or philosophical tradition, topics discussed in this course will include justice, mercy, compassion, and grace. Biblical ethics of hospitality, community, and respectful discourse about differences will guide discussions. The range of ways that psychologists may engage with society will be considered, including involvement in racial reconciliation, short-term and long-term clinical missions, resettlement of refugees and immigrants, advocating for change in social and political policy, mental health advocacy in religious communities, and participation in ecumenical and inter-faith dialogue about psychological illness and health.

PPSY 798, Special Topics, 1-6 Units

Elective courses are offered each semester according to the interests of students and faculty. Students are required to take elective courses during their program; some may choose to take additional courses of interest beyond the unit requirement of the program.

PPSY 799, Readings in Psychology, 1-4 Units

Faculty

Chair

Marjorie Graham-Howard, Ph.D.

Director, Psy.D. Program

Samuel Girguis, Psy.D.

Director of Clinical Training (Internship)

Ted Scott Bledsoe, Psy.D.

Director of Clinical Training (Practicum)

Marjorie Graham-Howard, Ph.D.

Professors

Ted Scott Bledsoe, Psy.D.

David Brokaw, Ph.D., ABPP

Stephen Cheung, Psy.D.

Marjorie Graham-Howard, Ph.D.

Loren Martin, Ph.D.

Theresa Clement Tisdale, Ph.D., Psy.D.

Associate Professors

Holli Eaton, Psy.D.

Charles Chege, Psy.D.

Katharine Putman, Psy.D.

Assistant Professor

Samuel Girguis, Psy.D.

Professors Emeriti

Marv Erisman, Ph.D.

Sheryn T. Scott, Ph.D.