Department of Sociology, TESOL, and Modern Languages

With an intentional focus on scholarship, faith integration, diversity, and internationalization, APU provides high-quality academic programs within a tight-knit community of disciples and scholars.

Department Overview

The Department of Sociology, TESOL, and Modern Languages offers the sociology major and four minors: environmental studies, Spanish, sociology, and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). At the graduate level, it offers the M.A in TESOL, Certificate in TESOL, and Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL). For program descriptions, click the Programs tab above and select the appropriate major, minor, M.A., or certificate. An overview of graduate programs may also be found below.

Master of Arts in TESOL, Certificate in TESOL, and Certificate in TEFL

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

The Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) offers prospective and experienced teachers of English as a second or foreign language a 33-unit master’s degree program comprising courses in language acquisition theory, English grammar and pronunciation, intercultural communication, sociolinguistics, language teaching methods, observation and practice in classroom teaching, language assessment, and program design.

The 6-unit Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) is designed for students who seek minimal qualifications to teach English abroad. The 18-unit Certificate in TESOL program is designed for postbaccalaureate students who desire more specialized skills in TESOL but do not wish to pursue the entire graduate degree.

Mission Statement for TESOL Programs

The TESOL programs at Azusa Pacific University prepare present and future educators, international and domestic, with the competencies and perspectives needed to teach English in a manner marked by professional excellence, intercultural sensitivity, integrity, and compassion. To this end, the department offers an 18-unit undergraduate TESOL minor, an 18-unit graduate certificate in TESOL, a 6-unit graduate certificate in TEFL, and a 33-unit master’s degree in TESOL—all taught by experienced Christian faculty who are motivated to serve God and their students, and who engage students in practical training grounded in theory and research.

Corequisites

  1. Language Proficiency
    1. For the master’s degree, prior to graduation, native speakers of English must verify completion within the last 10 years of a minimum of 6 semester units of college-level foreign language with at least a 3.0 grade-point average on a 4.0 scale, or its equivalent. Options to satisfy the foreign language requirement include formal coursework and community language learning. Students may also establish proficiency via an exam.
    2. All students graduating from non-English-speaking institutions must satisfy the English Proficiency Requirements. In addition, the following scores on the internet-based TOEFL, or equivalent proof of proficiency, are required for admission to the online or field-based TESOL programs.
      1. Reading: 25
      2. Speaking: 25
      3. Writing: 25
      4. Listening: 25
  2. Professional Development
    Students are required to provide evidence of attendance at a national, state, or regional conference related to language teaching prior to completion of the master’s degree.

Cross-Program Enrollment

Students in the TESOL master’s degree programs may take up to four courses in a different format—on campus, online, or field-based. The program director’s approval is required prior to enrollment.

Accreditation

Admission

University graduate admission and program-specific requirements must be met before an application is complete (see Admission to the University). Program-specific application requirements are available online.

International students should contact Graduate and Professional Admissions for application procedures.

Majors

Minors

Master’s

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Certificates

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL)

ETHN 150, Introduction to Ethnic Studies, 3 Units

This class examines the complexities of ethnic and racial diversity in the United States, exploring the historical and cultural aspects of how ethnic minority groups have been affected by social inequality in America. The course provides an overview of concepts and terms essential to studies and discussions within the discipline of ethnic studies. Covered terms include: race, racism, racialization and racialism, ethnicity and ethnic identity, ethnonationalism or ethnic nationalism, panethnicity, ethnocentrism, prejudice, discrimination, segregation, marginalization, diversity, pluralism, multiculturalism, affirmative action, enculturation, acculturation, assimilation, and self-determination. This survey course provides an overview of the discipline of ethnic studies as a whole. Topics of study include: the social construction of race and ethnicity, notions of identity and citizenship, and analysis of African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos and Latinos, Native Americans, and Pacific Islanders. The effect of culture on spiritual experience and identity are also examined. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

ETHN 355, The Asian American Experience, 3 Units

This class introduces students to the history and experiences of Asian Americans. Using the analytical lens of sociological inquiry, students examine immigration patterns, sociopolitical and economic challenges, as well as issues encountered by Asian Americans due to racism and/or ignorance. The course also explores the contributions of Asian cultures to the fabric of American life.

ETHN 356, The African American Experience, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the experience of African Americans in the United States, including an examination of African American contributions to the nation's development, as well as an exploration of the dimensions of their identity. Students are challenged to critically analyze and interpret history and culture. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

ETHN 357, The Chicano(a)/Latino(a) Experience, 3 Units

This class introduces students to the history and experiences of Chicano(a)/Latino(a) Americans while examining their immigration patterns, sociopolitical and economic influences, heritage and traditions, contributions to American culture, and race relations.

GLBL 101, Self-Directed Language Learning I, 4 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence designed as an individually tailored, self-directed course for developing elementary competence in the language and culture of a foreign speech community, typically within study abroad contexts. Two semesters of the same language are required to meet the General Education requirement.

GLBL 102, Self-Directed Language Learning II, 4 Units

A continuation of GLBL 101, this is an individually tailored, self-directed course for developing low-intermediate competence in the language and culture of a foreign speech community. Two semesters of the same language are required to meet the General Education requirement.

Prerequisite: GLBL 101

GLBL 120, Contemporary Global Issues, 3 Units

Focusing on cities in the Majority World, this course introduces key concepts in global studies. Global issues are surveyed and analyzed, such as urbanization, income inequality, environment degradation, conflict and migration; and cultural, economic, and political causes are discussed. Drawing on research in sociology, global urbanism, and sustainable development, students consider contributing factors and assess prospects for constructive global engagement. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

GLBL 201, Anthropology for Everyday Life, 3 Units

This course equips students with a practical methodology for exploring the social and cultural reality of group members within local communities: the development of cross-cultural relationships combined with reflection on anthropological concepts and experiences. Students prepare to enter relationships of mutual learning with peoples throughout the world. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

GLBL 260, Intercultural Communication, 3 Units

Students in this course explore the dynamic processes involved in establishing a relationship between culturally diverse individuals. Respecting divergent cultural patterns is promoted, but not at the expense of salient spiritual, moral, and ethical issues involved in intercultural communication. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

GLBL 300, Self-Directed Language Learning, 3 Units

The course provides an individually tailored, community-based program for developing proficiency in a foreign language. Emphasis is placed on intensive listening and speaking practice to facilitate full participation in family, study, research, and service activities in a foreign culture. This option is offered only for language courses not taught on campus or for participants of the Global Learning Term Program.

GLBL 305, Peoples and Places, 3 Units

This seminar prepares students for their Global Learning Term or other study abroad experiences through focused area study via a combination of library searches, directed reading, and learning contract development.

GLBL 315, Urban Society, 3 Units

This course connects students with the people, problems, and prospects of greater Los Angeles. It provides the foundation for understanding urban values and beliefs in historical context, exposure to urban systems, the application of global perspectives, and the collaborative exploration of solutions. Course is available only through the L.A. Term. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

GLBL 318, Immigration and Integration, 3 Units

An introduction to immigration in the United States, its recent history, theories, and legal aspects, with attention to the integration of immigrant communities into the socio-economic fabric of Los Angeles and beyond. The course addresses the present state of the national immigration debate and encourages students to apply and integrate their faith perspectives on the issues. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: GLBL 315

GLBL 320, Global Engagement in the 21st Century, 3 Units

This course studies contemporary global issues and draws extensively from social documentaries (DVDs), biblical texts, students' intercultural experiences, and contemporary models of community-based engagement.

Prerequisite: Participation in Los Angeles Term or instructor consent

GLBL 325, Family Organization, 3 Units

Students immerse themselves in the daily life of host families and communities in crosscultural settings where they explore unfamiliar assumptions and norms of behavior as the basis for composing a family ethnography. Course is only available through the Global Learning Term.

Prerequisite: GLBL 305

GLBL 330, Community Transformation, 6 Units

This course offers a formal and experiential study of the transformation of urban, multicultural communities with the goal of developing a service ethic through a semester-long internship. It involves directed reading, reflective papers, a service practicum, and group discussions- aimed at both the transformation of the student community and the wider Los Angeles community. Course is available only through the L.A. Term Program.

GLBL 335, Global Internship, 6 Units

The Global Internship is an extended, structured service experience within a cross-cultural setting addressing community-identified needs. Students work under expert supervision for a minimum of 150 hours, integrating disciplinary study with direct interaction and personal reflection and writing. The course aims to improve students' global knowledge and intercultural competence, while guiding them in making a modest contribution to community improvement. Course is only available through the Global Learning Term (GLT) program.

Prerequisite: GLBL 305

GLBL 340, Community Life, 3 Units

This field seminar helps students learn how to experience another culture. Students explore several topics (e.g., art, schooling, group relations, music, folklore, politics, etc.) of a chosen country, city, or people through observation and discovery, local event participation, informant interviews, problem solving, and journal keeping. Course is only available through the Global Learning Term.

GLBL 345, Urban Religious Movements, 3 Units

This course contains a survey of religious movements in Los Angeles, including Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Orthodox Christianity, Judaism, and New Age. Emphasis is placed on the vernacular character of their faith, embodied and expressed in the beliefs, attitudes, practices, and rituals of their specific social and cultural situations. Learning activities include participant-observation at religious services, informant interviewing, directed reading, and group discussion. Course is available only through the L.A. Term.

GLBL 350, Writing 3: Global Study Project, 3 Units

Students carry out a self-designed study/research project within an intercultural setting on topics of public concern. The course provides conceptual and practical tools for designing the inquiry under the combined direction of an academic advisor and an on-site guide. Course is only available through the Global Learning Term (GLT) program. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2 and GLBL305

GLBL 355, Principles and Practice of Community Engagement, 3 Units

This course introduces students to foundations and principles of community development. With in-class learning from real-world case materials, principles are explored and applied in practice during a three-to-four-week service-learning field project/internship with a local nongovernmental organization (NGO) or development organization that addresses community need(s). This course is offered only in international programs. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

GLBL 365, Women and Globalization, 3 Units

This course critically examines the relationship between women and globalization. Globalization is analyzed from an historical perspective focusing on its antecedents in capitalism and modernity. While drawing from the fields of economics, history, and political science, this class examines the intersection of women and globalization primarily from an anthropological and global perspective. Topics to be read, discussed, and analyzed include capitalism, globalization, development, transnational migration, labor, media, the environment, and religion.

GLBL 399, Global Seminar, 3 Units

This is a short-term, collaboratively led study and service seminar focused on a vital global issue in an international setting. The course enlightens learners' disciplinary perspectives, develops their intercultural competence, and strengthens their commitment to serve "the least, the last, and the lost" throughout their lives. It includes three on-campus class sessions prior to a 10-day field seminar.

GLBL 420, Sustainable Societies, 3 Units

Sustainable Societies is a seminar-style upper-division and applied course focused on creating communities that are socially equitable, economically expansive, culturally adaptive, and ecologically sustainable. Practical themes in the "sustainability conversation" are linked to cross-cultural field experiences and post-college vocational planning. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing

GLBL 425, Integration and Formation Seminar, 1 Unit

Integration and Formation takes students through the process of integrating their study away experiences with their spiritual, ethical, and vocational development. It provides study away returnees with the opportunity to analyze their experiences with others while understanding the process of negotiating changing cultural norms to become ethical and responsible global learners. May be taken for 0 units by petition only.

Prerequisite: Completed Study Away Program or Instructor consent. Instructor or department consent must be obtained to drop course.

GLBL 465, Globalization and Development, 3 Units

This course presents a brief historical perspective on globalization, focusing on the transitions from premercantilism to industrialization to the world today. Economic, political, and social perspectives on the structural changes associated with globalization today are discussed, along with the major challenges and opportunities concerning globalization as it relates to the poor. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

Prerequisite: GLBL 201

GLBL 495, Special Topics, 3 Units

This course addresses topics of current interest in Global Studies not covered in-depth by the core and elective Global Studies courses. Possible topics include: women and global human rights, urbanization and global poverty, global health issues, humanitarian aid and relief, global ethics, and specific areas within larger topics of global systems, issues, and inequity. Course may be repeated as the topic varies up to 9 units, or three times.

Prerequisite: GLBL 301

GLBL 496, Global Studies Senior Seminar, 3 Units

Major global issues and trends are examined so as to frame possible Christian social interventions in response to some of the moral and ethical challenges of today. Students prepare and present a formal project report.

Prerequisite: Senior standing, GLBL 201, or Instructor's consent, completion of the majority of God's Word requirement, and upper-division writing intensive course.

GLBL 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

Consists of a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class. May be repeated for credit.

GLBL 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

GLBL 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no less than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, electronic media, or artistic creation of a material form. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Upper-division writing intensive course or instructor consent; and junior or senior standing

SOC 120, Introduction to Sociology, 3 Units

This course focuses on the origins and development of sociology as a response to pressing social problems. It emphasizes mastery of sociological terminology. The key learning outcome will be the acquisition of a Sociological Perspective and the ability to analyze social life in a sociological manner. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

SOC 120H, Introduction to Sociology - Honors, 3 Units

This course focuses on the origins and development of sociology as a response to pressing social problems. It emphasizes mastery of sociological terminology. Meets the General Education Requirement: Social Science. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

SOC 225, Contemporary Social Problems, 3 Units

The complex social problems faced by people in a changing technological society are studied. Institutions, attempts to find solutions, and exploration of alternatives are emphasized.

SOC 230, Comparative Family Systems, 3 Units

This course compares traditional family patterns with the new options available to men and women, both as individuals and partners. It focuses on the changing roles of men and women inside and outside of marriage, the challenge of the two-career family, and the search for the family's place as an integral part of society.

SOC 235, Race and Ethnicity, 3 Units

The sociological understanding of race and ethnicity is necessarily complex as it relates to experiences, structures, institutions, policies, and history. This course examines how race relates to, and overlaps with, other human experiences, structures, institutions, policies, and social history, and takes a theoretical and discursive approach to race and ethnicity, which helps students develop multiple analytical frameworks for thinking about race and ethnicity, as well as an anti-racist approach. On the one hand, the sociological study of race and ethnicity is a critical examination of how humans have used categories as a way to maintain, justify, and sustain systems of oppression; on the other hand, the sociological perspective yields hope in developing an anti-racist mindset that resists and actively works against all forms of domination. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

SOC 298, Basic Sociological Theory, 3 Units

The function of theory and the contributions to modern sociological thought by the principal sociologists of the 19th and 20th centuries are considered. The application of theory to contemporary social concerns is investigated.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

SOC 358, Human Diversity, 3 Units

Students examine diversity in a pluralistic society, with a focus on groups that have been assigned subordinate positions because of race, religion, country of origin, disability, age, language, or gender. The nature of prejudice and issues related to discrimination and oppression are explored. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

SOC 359, Immigrant L.A., 3 Units

This course focuses on the social dimensions of immigration into Southern California. "Likeness" and "otherness" are examined in relation to race/ethnicity, transnationality, global inequality, and citizenship. Macrosocial and economic forces, along with governmental policies are analyzed and critiqued. In-depth stories of immigrants and various site visits contribute to students' experiential learning on the subject.

SOC 360, Sociology of Religion, 3 Units

This course offers an objective analysis of the interrelations between religious phenomena and social institutions, structures, and behavior. There is special emphasis on the distinction between church and sect, religious and social stratification, secularization, science and religion, and religious movements.

SOC 361, Education and Society, 3 Units

This course introduces the Sociology of Education, examining the relationship between schooling and the larger society. Taking a comparative and historical perspective on education as a social institution, the course examines major issues in the field, concentrating on the role of education in cultural transmission, socialization, and performance- as well as the use of education in legitimating social inequality and transmitting morals and values. The course also explores the structure of educational systems as institutional bureaucracies and organizations. Students apply their learning in a scholarly sociological analysis of a current educational policy or practice.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

SOC 404, Community, 3 Units

Students examine the various ways people organize themselves into communities and develop means of governance. This course explores the impact of the community on people, the ways power is used and misused, social conflict, social change, and the need for social involvement. A wide variety of communities are examined: rural, urban, village, metropolis, Utopian communities, communes, planned cities, and new towns. Cultural and national differences in the development of communities are assessed.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

SOC 405, The Sociology of Gender, 3 Units

This course in an investigation of gender and sex roles, primarily in American culture and society. The course explores the ways in which society shapes notions of what it means to be a "woman" and a "man" by examining the theories and research on how people define themselves and interact with others in a variety of contexts (e.g., family, personal relationships, work, health, religion, etc.). It also examines the sociological implications of cultural definitions of femininity and masculinity as seen through various racial, historical, economic, and sexualized perspectives

Prerequisite: SOC 120 or SOC 358, and Junior or Senior Standing.

SOC 410, Field Internships, 4 Units

This course offers students the opportunity to gain supervised work experience through internships with professional organizations working to address contemporary social problems. Students are introduced to and placed in internship organizations that have been approved by the course professor, with placements varying from international to local organizations. Various approaches to researching social problems and developing research projects involving solutions to those problems are introduced and explored. Students conduct their own fieldwork in coordination with the course professor and internship supervisor. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: SOC 120 and junior standing.

SOC 425, Social Movements, 3 Units

Students undertake several analytical tasks in this course such as understanding how and why social movements emerge, what strategies are used to maintain the movement, how collective identity develops, and what makes a social movement successful. Students look to contemporary social movements to respond to these queries.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

SOC 455, Crime and Delinquency, 3 Units

This course explores the dimensions and nature of both traditional crime and criminality and the newly recognized forms of crime which exist within contemporary society. The criminal's relationship to the courts, police, and other penal agencies is the focus of attention.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

SOC 464, Social Stratification, 3 Units

Theories and research in social stratification are the focus of this course. Topics covered include role, status, structure of differential rankings in society, criteria for ranking, functions and dysfunction, correlates of class positions, social change, and social mobility.

SOC 468, Contemporary Social Theory, 3 Units

This course looks at major theoretical orientations in contemporary sociological thought, explores the ways these ideas have changed in relation to the structural transformations, and examines connections between the underlying assumptions of key theorists and their conclusions about the nature of social life.

Prerequisite: SOC 120, SOC 298

SOC 471, Writing 3: Qualitative Social Research Methods, 3 Units

This course in basic social scientific research focuses on qualitative methods. Students gain experience with participant observation, intensive interviewing, and other field methods. Qualitative research design, data collection, data analysis, and research report writing are covered. As a Writing 3 course, students are assigned structured assignments with multiple drafts that will lead to a final piece of professional writing in the field of sociology. Writing is assessed throughout the course by the instructor and through peer review. The final product is presented as one would present it at a professional conference. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: SOC 298 and Writing 2

SOC 472, Writing 3: Quantitative Social Research Methods, 3 Units

This basic course in social scientific research focuses on quantitative methods, with students gaining experience in survey research, content analysis, and other statistical methods. Course material also covers quantitative research design, data collection, data analysis, and research report writing. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2, MATH 130 (C- or better).

SOC 495, Special Topics, 3 Units

This course addresses topics of current interest in sociology not covered by the core and elective sociology courses. Possible topics include the sociology of sports, media, or fashion, and specific areas within such larger topics as gender, race, class, and religion. Course may be repeated for credit, as the topic varies.

SOC 496, Senior Seminar: Faith and Social Issues, 3 Units

Students investigate the impact of modernity on family life, work, religion, politics, and the arts, and consider questions such as: How can people create and preserve a morally coherent life in a society that is pluralistic, secular, and privatized? What difference does Christian faith make in the way people understand the world, and in determining how people ought to live? Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: Junior Standing

SOC 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This course consists of a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: SOC 120

TESL 100, Academic English for Multilingual Undergraduates, 4 Units

Academic English for Multilingual Undergraduates prepares multilingual undergraduate students for three primary academic language tasks of undergraduate study - academic writing, presentations, and seminar speaking. The course focuses on both written and spoken academic English. To the extent possible, assignments will be tied to the students' undergraduate coursework. This course is taken prior to WRIT 110.

TESL 101, English for Academic Purposes I, 4 Units

This is an advanced level English language course designed to prepare international students for the cultural and academic realm of speaking and listening at an undergraduate level in an American university. Students put into practice the communication skills used at an American university by getting involved in and observing social contexts in and around the university campus, and by emulating and discussing in class many of the situations in which these skills take place. In addition, students will examine American values which influence and determine the use of listening and speaking for communication in American culture. For international students only; to be taken concurrently with TESL 102.

TESL 102, English for Academic Purposes II, 4 Units

This is an advanced level English language course designed for students who speak English as a second language. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing skills used within academic settings. These skills include interacting with a text, reading for information, paraphrasing, summarizing, expressing an opinion, writing essays, and documenting papers using academic citations. For international students only; to be taken concurrently with TESL 101.

TESL 345, Second-language Pedagogy I, 3 Units

An introduction to the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages, this course deals with learner needs; approaches and methods of teaching; techniques for teaching speaking, listening, and integrated skills; lesson planning; the use of technology in language teaching and learning; and classroom management.

TESL 456, Teaching Practicum, 3 Units

Student teachers engage in practice teaching and are observed by mentor teachers. Through short debriefing sessions, they are guided into a discovery of their teaching behaviors and alternative ways of achieving desired results.

TESL 500, English for Internationals, 3 Units

The course prepares international students for the interpersonal and academic language tasks of graduate study. Topics include developing effective listening techniques, giving persuasive oral presentations, reading authentic materials, and writing academic prose. Offered only in on-campus program.

TESL 501, Language Learning through Technology, 3 Units

Students explore how the use of technology can enhance language learning and use online tools to design language learning lessons. Students prepare a presentation on online learning suitable for a conference presentation. Offered only in online program.

TESL 503, Language and Culture Learning, 3 Units

Students engage in exploring, learning, and acquiring a language and culture through a series of guided tasks and activities such as in-field experience in independent language learning and cultural investigation. Offered only in field-based program.

TESL 505, Second-language Acquisition, 3 Units

This course examines the process of acquiring a language, focusing on second-language acquisition. Questions to be explored include: What is the nature of language proficiency? What regular patterns characterize the process of language acquisition? What strategies do successful language learners employ? How do linguistic, affective, cognitive and social factors affect second-language development? What is the role of language teaching in facilitating the process of second-language acquisition?

TESL 505A, Second-language Acquisition: Part I, 1 Unit

This course examines the process of acquiring a language, focusing on second-language acquisition. Questions to be explored include: What is the nature of language proficiency? What regular patterns characterize the process of language acquisition? What strategies do successful language learners employ? How do linguistic, affective, cognitive, and social factors affect second-language development? What is the role of language teaching in facilitating the process of second-language acquisition? In the field-based program, courses are offered as three 1-unit courses to be taken in sequence. TESL 505A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 505.

TESL 505B, Second-language Acquisition: Part II, 1 Unit

This course examines the process of acquiring a language, focusing on second-language acquisition. Questions to be explored include: What is the nature of language proficiency? What regular patterns characterize the process of language acquisition? What strategies do successful language learners employ? How do linguistic, affective, cognitive, and social factors affect second-language development? What is the role of language teaching in facilitating the process of second-language acquisition? In the field-based program, courses are offered as three 1-unit courses to be taken in sequence. TESL 505A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 505.

Prerequisite: TESL 505A

TESL 505C, Second-language Acquisition: Part III, 1 Unit

This course examines the process of acquiring a language, focusing on second-language acquisition. Questions to be explored include: What is the nature of language proficiency? What regular patterns characterize the process of language acquisition? What strategies do successful language learners employ? How do linguistic, affective, cognitive, and social factors affect second-language development? What is the role of language teaching in facilitating the process of second-language acquisition? In the field-based program, courses are offered as three 1-unit courses to be taken in sequence. TESL 505A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 505.

Prerequisite: TESL 505A, TESL 505B

TESL 509, Special Topics in TESOL, 1-3 Units

A subject of current interest in TESOL is examined in depth. Students analyze controversial issues and develop a reflective position. Course requirements may include attendance at the annual TESOL convention. Students may repeat the course up to a maximum of 6 units. Each course must address a different topic.

TESL 515, Teaching English Grammar, 3 Units

This course focuses on cultivating grammatical competence in ESL/EFL students. It incorporates an overview of English grammatical structures, from word level to discourse level, in the context of how these structures are acquired by ESL/EFL students and with particular attention to assessing structures in student writing. Class members explore effective means of presenting and practicing these structures within a communicative framework.

TESL 515A, Teaching English Grammar: Part I, 1 Unit

This course focuses on cultivating grammatical competence in ESL/EFL students. It incorporates an overview of English grammatical structures, from word level to discourse level, in the context of how these structures are acquired by ESL/EFL students and with particular attention to assessing structures in student writing. Class members explore effective means of presenting and practicing these structures within a communicative framework. The field-based program offers three 1-unit courses to be taken in sequence. TESL 515A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 515.

TESL 515B, Teaching English Grammar: Part II, 1 Unit

This course focuses on cultivating grammatical competence in ESL/EFL students. It incorporates an overview of English grammatical structures, from word level to discourse level, in the context of how these structures are acquired by ESL/EFL students and with particular attention to assessing structures in student writing. Class members explore effective means of presenting and practicing these structures within a communicative framework. The field-based program offers three 1-unit courses to be taken in sequence. TESL 515A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 515.

Prerequisite: TESL 515A

TESL 515C, Teaching English Grammar: Part III, 1 Unit

This course focuses on cultivating grammatical competence in ESL/EFL students. It incorporates an overview of English grammatical structures, from word level to discourse level, in the context of how these structures are acquired by ESL/EFL students and with particular attention to assessing structures in student writing. Class members explore effective means of presenting and practicing these structures within a communicative framework. The field-based program offers three 1-unit courses to be taken in sequence. TESL 515A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 515.

Prerequisite: TESL 515A, TESL 515B

TESL 525, Teaching English Pronunciation, 3 Units

The phonology of English is addressed with a view towards pedagogy. Students examine the articulation of English sounds, as well as the rules that govern their use in native-like speech, and explore ways of applying this knowledge to the teaching of pronunciation.

TESL 525A, Teaching English Pronunciation: Part I Phonetic Description, 1 Unit

The phonology of English is addressed with a view toward pedagogy. Students examine the articulation of English sounds, as well as the rules that govern their use in native-like speech, and explore ways of applying this knowledge to the teaching of pronunciation. TESL 525A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 525.

TESL 525B, Teaching English Pronunciation: Part II Teaching Materials, 1 Unit

The phonology of English is addressed with a view toward pedagogy. Students examine the articulation of English sounds, as well as the rules that govern their use in native-like speech, and explore ways of applying this knowledge to the teaching of pronunciation. TESL 525A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 525.

Prerequisite: TESL 525A

TESL 525C, Teaching English Pronunciation: Part III Needs Assessment, 1 Unit

The phonology of English is addressed with a view toward pedagogy. Students examine the articulation of English sounds, as well as the rules that govern their use in native-like speech, and explore ways of applying this knowledge to the teaching of pronunciation. TESL 525A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 525.

Prerequisite: TESL 525A, TESL 525B

TESL 530, Intercultural Communication and Language Teaching, 3 Units

This course explores the complex process of intercultural communication and how this affects teaching English as a second or foreign language. Students explore the process of learning another culture and learning their own culture through films, course readings, discussions, and an ethnographic experience. They explore the process of teaching culture by developing and presenting an ESL/EFL unit applying the guidelines for culture teaching presented in class texts, lectures, and discussions.

TESL 530A, Intercultural Communication and Language Teaching: Preparing an Ethnographic Inquiry, 1 Unit

This course explores the complex process of intercultural communication and how this affects teaching English as a second or foreign language. Students explore the process of learning another culture and learning their own culture through films, course readings, discussions, and an ethnographic experience. They explore the process of teaching culture by developing and presenting an ESL/EFL unit applying the guidelines for culture teaching presented in class texts, lectures, and discussions. In the Field-based program, courses are offered as three one-unit courses to be taken in sequence (either Summer 2, FI, FII or Spring I, II, and Summer 1), each section (A,B,C) is one unit each. TESL 530A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 530.

TESL 530B, Intercultural Communication and Language Teaching: Implementing an Ethnographic Inquiry, 1 Unit

This course explores the complex process of intercultural communication and how this affects teaching English as a second or foreign language. Students explore the process of learning another culture and learning their own culture through films, course readings, discussions, and an ethnographic experience. They explore the process of teaching culture by developing and presenting an ESL/EFL unit applying the guidelines for culture teaching presented in class texts, lectures, and discussions. In the Field-based program, courses are offered as three one-unit courses to be taken in sequence (either Summer 2, FI, FII or Spring I, II, and Summer 1), each section (A,B,C) is one unit each. TESL 530A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 530.

Prerequisite: TESL 530A

TESL 530C, Intercultural Communication and Language Teaching: Writing up and Reporting an Ethnographic Inquiry, 1 Unit

This course explores the complex process of intercultural communication and how this affects teaching English as a second or foreign language. Students explore the process of learning another culture and learning their own culture through films, course readings, discussions, and an ethnographic experience. They explore the process of teaching culture by developing and presenting an ESL/EFL unit applying the guidelines for culture teaching presented in class texts, lectures, and discussions. In the Field-based program, courses are offered as three one-unit courses to be taken in sequence (either Summer 2, FI, FII or Spring I, II, and Summer 1), each section (A,B,C) is one unit each. TESL 530A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 530.

Prerequisite: TESL 530A, TESL 530B

TESL 535, Sociolinguistics and Language Teaching, 3 Units

This introduction to sociolinguistics explores multiple expressions of English. These include national, regional, social, and gender varieties, as well as styles, registers, pidgins, and creoles. Also studied are language change, the mutual effect of culture and language, and the influence of cultural patterns on speech acts within the larger perspective of governmental language planning as impacted by the historical legacy of the English language. Students develop more complex understandings of how language and language teaching is influenced by societal, political, cultural, psychological, and interpersonal issues and consider the implications of this enhanced understanding on their classroom pedagogy and their views on language planning and policy.

TESL 535A, Sociolinguistics and Language Teaching: Part I, 1 Unit

This introduction to sociolinguistics explores multiple expressions of English. These include national, regional, social, and gender varieties, as well as styles, registers, pidgins, and creoles. Also studied are language change, the mutual effect of culture and language, and the influence of cultural patterns on speech acts within the larger perspective of governmental language planning as impacted by the historical legacy of the English language. Students develop more complex understandings of how language and language teaching is influenced by societal, political, cultural, psychological, and interpersonal issues and consider the implications of this enhanced understanding on their classroom pedagogy and their views on language planning and policy. TESL 535A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 535.

TESL 535B, Sociolinguistics and Language Teaching: Part II, 1 Unit

This introduction to sociolinguistics explores multiple expressions of English. These include national, regional, social, and gender varieties, as well as styles, registers, pidgins, and creoles. Also studied are language change, the mutual effect of culture and language, and the influence of cultural patterns on speech acts within the larger perspective of governmental language planning as impacted by the historical legacy of the English language. Students develop more complex understandings of how language and language teaching is influenced by societal, political, cultural, psychological, and interpersonal issues and consider the implications of this enhanced understanding on their classroom pedagogy and their views on language planning and policy. TESL 535A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 535.

Prerequisite: TESL 535A

TESL 535C, Sociolinguistics and Language Teaching: Part III, 1 Unit

This introduction to sociolinguistics explores multiple expressions of English. These include national, regional, social, and gender varieties, as well as styles, registers, pidgins, and creoles. Also studied are language change, the mutual effect of culture and language, and the influence of cultural patterns on speech acts within the larger perspective of governmental language planning as impacted by the historical legacy of the English language. Students develop more complex understandings of how language and language teaching is influenced by societal, political, cultural, psychological, and interpersonal issues and consider the implications of this enhanced understanding on their classroom pedagogy and their views on language planning and policy. TESL 535A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 535.

Prerequisite: TESL 535A, TESL 535B

TESL 537, Critical Perspectives on Christianity and English Language Teaching, 3 Units

This course engages students in a critical examination of Christianity and English language teaching, investigating the ethical and professional dilemmas that arise when faith and spirituality enter, or are barred from, the language classroom. Students research, discuss, and present on diverse, opposing perspectives.

TESL 537A, Critical Perspectives on Christianity and English Language Teaching: Part I, 1 Unit

This course engages students in a critical examination of Christianity and English language teaching, investigating the ethical and professional dilemmas that arise when faith and spirituality enter, or are barred from, the language classroom. Students research, discuss, and present on diverse, opposing perspectives. TESL 537A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 537.

TESL 537B, Critical Perspectives on Christianity and English Language Teaching: Part II, 1 Unit

This course engages students in a critical examination of Christianity and English language teaching, investigating the ethical and professional dilemmas that arise when faith and spirituality enter, or are barred from, the language classroom. Students research, discuss, and present on diverse, opposing perspectives. TESL 537A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 537.

Prerequisite: TESL 537A

TESL 537C, Critical Perspectives on Christianity and English Language Teaching: Part III, 1 Unit

This course engages students in a critical examination of Christianity and English language teaching, investigating the ethical and professional dilemmas that arise when faith and spirituality enter, or are barred from, the language classroom. Students research, discuss, and present on diverse, opposing perspectives. TESL 537A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 537.

Prerequisite: TESL 537A, TESL 537B

TESL 545, Second-language Pedagogy I, 3 Units

An introduction to the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages, this course deals with learner needs; approaches and methods of teaching; techniques for teaching speaking, listening, and integrated skills; lesson planning; the use of technology in language teaching and learning; and classroom management.

TESL 545A, Second-language Pedagogy I: Part I, 1 Unit

An introduction to the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages, this course deals with learner needs; approaches and methods of teaching; techniques for teaching speaking, listening, and integrated skills; lesson planning; the use of technology in language teaching and learning; and classroom management. TESL 545A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 545.

TESL 545B, Second-language Pedagogy I: Part II, 1 Unit

An introduction to the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages, this course deals with learner needs; approaches and methods of teaching; techniques for teaching speaking, listening, and integrated skills; lesson planning; the use of technology in language teaching and learning; and classroom management. TESL 545A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 545.

Prerequisite: TESL 545A

TESL 545C, Second-language Pedagogy I: Part III, 1 Unit

An introduction to the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages, this course deals with learner needs; approaches and methods of teaching; techniques for teaching speaking, listening, and integrated skills; lesson planning; the use of technology in language teaching and learning; and classroom management. TESL 545A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 545.

Prerequisite: TESL 545A, TESL 545B

TESL 548, Teaching EFL with Children, 3 Units

This course covers theoretical and practical aspects of language and literacy development opportunities for children learning English as a foreign language (EFL). Teachers in this course study concerns, approaches, and model programs in teaching English to children in non-English speaking contexts where there may be (a) distinctive demands on the use of required curriculum materials, (b) limitations in facilities, resources, and teaching time; and (c) strong expectations on students to pass standardized examinations.

TESL 550, Second-language Pedagogy II, 3 Units

This course focuses on the theoretical foundations, relevant research, and classroom applications of the teaching of reading and writing to those who are considered advanced students of English as a second or foreign language.

TESL 550A, Second-language Pedagogy II: Part I, 1 Unit

This course focuses on the theoretical foundations, relevant research, and classroom applications of the teaching of reading and writing to those who are considered advanced students of English as a second or foreign language. TESL 550A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 550.

TESL 550B, Second-language Pedagogy II: Part II, 1 Unit

This course focuses on the theoretical foundations, relevant research, and classroom applications of the teaching of reading and writing to those who are considered advanced students of English as a second or foreign language. TESL 550A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 550.

Prerequisite: TESL 550A

TESL 550C, Second-language Pedagogy II: Part III, 1 Unit

This course focuses on the theoretical foundations, relevant research, and classroom applications of the teaching of reading and writing to those who are considered advanced students of English as a second or foreign language. TESL 550A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 550.

Prerequisite: TESL 550A, TESL 550B

TESL 557, Reflective Teaching, 3 Units

Students complete classroom observation tasks designed to help them consider various dimensions of teaching and engage in practice teaching under the guidance of a mentor teacher. While observing, teaching, and reflecting, students use several strategies to explore their teaching, discovering alternative ways of achieving desired results.

TESL 557A, Reflective Teaching: Part I, 1 Unit

Students complete classroom observation tasks designed to help them consider various dimensions of teaching and engage in practice teaching under the guidance of a mentor teacher. While observing, teaching, and reflecting, students use several strategies to explore their teaching, discovering alternative ways of achieving desired results. TESL 557A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 557.

TESL 557B, Reflective Teaching: Part II, 1 Unit

Students complete classroom observation tasks designed to help them consider various dimensions of teaching and engage in practice teaching under the guidance of a mentor teacher. While observing, teaching, and reflecting, students use several strategies to explore their teaching, discovering alternative ways of achieving desired results. TESL 557A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 557.

Prerequisite: TESL 557A

TESL 557C, Reflective Teaching: Part III, 1 Unit

Students complete classroom observation tasks designed to help them consider various dimensions of teaching and engage in practice teaching under the guidance of a mentor teacher. While observing, teaching, and reflecting, students use several strategies to explore their teaching, discovering alternative ways of achieving desired results. TESL 557A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 557.

Prerequisite: TESL 557A, TESL 557B

TESL 560, Language Program Design, 3 Units

Based upon their articulated beliefs about language learning and teaching and the anticipated needs of their target ESL/EFL population, students develop a language program by formulating goals and objectives; evaluating, selecting, and developing materials; organizing the content and syllabus; and creating an assessment plan.

TESL 560A, Language Program Design: Part I, 1 Unit

Based upon their articulated beliefs about language learning and teaching and the anticipated needs of their target ESL/EFL population, students develop a language program by formulating goals and objectives; evaluating, selecting, and developing materials; organizing the content and syllabus; and creating an assessment plan. TESL 560A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 560.

TESL 560B, Language Program Design: Part II, 1 Unit

Based upon their articulated beliefs about language learning and teaching and the anticipated needs of their target ESL/EFL population, students develop a language program by formulating goals and objectives; evaluating, selecting, and developing materials; organizing the content and syllabus; and creating an assessment plan. TESL 560A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 560.

Prerequisite: TESL 560A

TESL 560C, Language Program Design: Part III, 1 Unit

Based upon their articulated beliefs about language learning and teaching and the anticipated needs of their target ESL/EFL population, students develop a language program by formulating goals and objectives; evaluating, selecting, and developing materials; organizing the content and syllabus; and creating an assessment plan. TESL 560A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 560.

Prerequisite: TESL 560A, TESL 560B

TESL 570, Second-language Assessment, 3 Units

Participants in this course examine the purposes, design, and administration of language proficiency and achievement tests used in ESL/EFL programs. Class members evaluate a standardized language test, construct a multiskill achievement test, and explore alternative means of classroom assessment.

TESL 570A, Second-language Assessment: Part I, 1 Unit

Participants in this course examine the purposes, design, and administration of language proficiency and achievement tests used in ESL/EFL programs. Class members evaluate a standardized language test, construct a multiskill achievement test, and explore alternative means of classroom assessment. TESL 570A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 570.

TESL 570B, Second-language Assessment: Part II, 1 Unit

Participants in this course examine the purposes, design, and administration of language proficiency and achievement tests used in ESL/EFL programs. Class members evaluate a standardized language test, construct a multiskill achievement test, and explore alternative means of classroom assessment. TESL 570A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 570.

Prerequisite: TESL 570A

TESL 570C, Second-language Assessment: Part III, 1 Unit

Participants in this course examine the purposes, design, and administration of language proficiency and achievement tests used in ESL/EFL programs. Class members evaluate a standardized language test, construct a multiskill achievement test, and explore alternative means of classroom assessment. TESL 570A, B, C combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 570.

Prerequisite: TESL 570A, TESL 570B

TESL 580, TESOL Portfolio, 3 Units

This course supports students in completing their TESOL program portfolio, which contains evidence of the competencies upon which the program is built.

TESL 589, Research Methods in TESOL, 3 Units

This course prepares teachers to conduct their own research in the area of second-language learning/teaching, and helps them become intelligent users of such research. Class members survey research methods applicable to second-language research, review studies exemplifying each approach, and walk through the process of developing a research proposal: selecting a topic, developing a working bibliography and literature review, and constructing a research design.

TESL 590, Thesis Preparation, 3 Units

Students engage in intensive study, research, and writing on a particular topic or problem in TESOL under the direction of a department faculty member. They are guided in reviewing the literature and in carrying out a previously approved research design. Enrollment is by petition only and must be approved by the department chair.

Prerequisite: TESL 589

TESL 595A, Action Research Project, 2 Units

This advanced course designed for in-service teachers, focuses on the planning, implementation, and evaluation of a self-designed action research project. Teachers select an area of teaching to investigate, design a research plan, collect data, observe behavior, reflect on the results, and write a research report. Teachers present their projects to peers and their professor in TESL 595B Action Research Project. Offered only in field-based program.

TESL 595B, Action Research Project, 1 Unit

This course is a sequel to TESL 595A, enabling in-service teachers to present, discuss, and defend the results of their action research project with their peers and professor. (This course is offered in the field-based program only.)

Prerequisite: TESL 595A

TESL 597A, Action Research: Part I, 1 Unit

This set of courses (597A,B,C) is designed for in-service teachers and focuses on the planning, implementation, and presentation of a self-designed action research project. In 597A, teachers select a classroom-based issue or problem and design a research plan to investigate it and implement their plan, by collecting and analyzing data. In 597B teachers complete their research and present the findings to a group of their peers. In 597C teachers write up and submit a written report. In the Field-based program, courses are offered as three one-unit courses to be taken in sequence; however, TESL 597B and 597C can be taken concurrently. TESL 595A and B combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 597A,B,C.

TESL 597B, Action Research: Part II, 1 Unit

This set of courses (597A,B,C) is designed for in-service teachers and focuses on the planning, implementation, and presentation of a self-designed action research project. In 597A, teachers select a classroom-based issue or problem and design a research plan to investigate it and implement their plan, by collecting and analyzing data. In 597B teachers complete their research and present the findings to a group of their peers. In 597C teachers write up and submit a written report. In the Field-based program, courses are offered as three one-unit courses to be taken in sequence; however, TESL 597B and 597C can be taken concurrently. TESL 595A and B combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 597A,B,C.

Prerequisite: TESL 597A

TESL 597C, Action Research: Part III, 1 Unit

This set of courses (597A,B,C) is designed for in-service teachers and focuses on the planning, implementation, and presentation of a self-designed action research project. In 597A, teachers select a classroom-based issue or problem and design a research plan to investigate it and implement their plan, by collecting and analyzing data. In 597B teachers complete their research and present the findings to a group of their peers. In 597C teachers write up and submit a written report. In the Field-based program, courses are offered as three one-unit courses to be taken in sequence; however, TESL 597B and 597C can be taken concurrently. TESL 595A and B combined is interchangeable with/equivalent to TESL 597A,B,C.

Prerequisite: TESL 597A, TESL 597B (May be taken concurrently)

TESL 599, Readings in TESOL, 1-3 Units

This course involves an independent study of subjects and interests beyond regular course offerings. Students explore particular topics or issues in accordance with an individualized study plan developed with a sponsoring faculty member and approved by the department chair.

PRSO 358, Human Diversity, 3 Units

Students examine diversity in a pluralistic society, with a focus on groups that have been assigned subordinate positions because of race, religion, country of origin, disability, age, language, or gender. The nature of prejudice and issues related to discrimination and oppression are explored. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

SPAN 101, Elementary Spanish I, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Spanish communication for beginners. Students develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and explore different cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

SPAN 102, Elementary Spanish II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Spanish communication for beginners. Students develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and explore different cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 101, or appropriate score on language placement exam.

SPAN 103, Elementary Spanish I for Healthcare Professionals, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Spanish communication for beginners, helping students develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Course material emphasizes key vocabulary for the healthcare fields and practical communication skills that students can immediately use on the job, and also introduces different cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Classes meet for three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

SPAN 104, Elementary Spanish II for Healthcare Professionals, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Spanish communication for beginners, helping students develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Course material emphasizes key vocabulary for the healthcare fields and practical communication skills that students can immediately use on the job, and also introduces different cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Classes meet for three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 103 or equivalent

SPAN 201, Intermediate Spanish I, 3 Units

This two-course sequence is a continuation of SPAN 101/ SPAN 102, and consists of a thorough review of grammar, expansion of students' vocabulary, conversation practice, and a variety of guided writing experiences. Related cultural media and literary excerpts are integrated into the course.

Prerequisite: SPAN 101, SPAN 102, or an appropriate Spanish CLEP Exam score, an appropriate Spanish Placement score, or department approval

SPAN 202, Intermediate Spanish II, 3 Units

This course is a continuation of SPAN 201.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, or an appropriate Spanish CLEP Exam score, an appropriate Spanish Placement score, or department approval

SPAN 250, Intermediate Conversation and Writing Abroad, 3 Units

This course provides intensive conversation with supportive written language practice in a select site abroad. Discussion of assigned social, cultural, or literary topics at an intermediate level is required. The course is arranged in tour-fashion during summer session.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201 and SPAN 202

SPAN 301, Spanish Conversation and Community, 3 Units

This course optimizes students' conversational abilities in Spanish, reinforcing grammatical structures and emphasizing communication skills that are concurrently put into practice through service-learning experiences. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 202

SPAN 305, Spanish for Heritage Speakers, 3 Units

This course is for native/heritage speakers of Spanish. It gives them opportunities to use their conversational skills in the community and to reinforce their reading and writing skills. It advances awareness and understanding of their cultural heritage.

Prerequisite: SPAN 202. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 310, Advanced Language-Study Practicum, 3 Units

This course features individualized field study in a Spanish-speaking milieu under the combined direction of a faculty advisor and an on-field supervisor. It provides students with a one-term immersion into Spanish language and culture with opportunities for participating in special research and/or service projects, family home stays, and/or field seminars.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201 and SPAN 202

SPAN 311, Civilization of Spain, 3 Units

The course covers Spanish history from early development through the modern era. The country's art, literature, religion, and architecture are discussed simultaneously with related historical events. Class is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 312, Latin American Civilization, 3 Units

This course surveys the history and aspects of the literature, art, and institutions of Latin America from pre-Columbian time to the modern age. Class is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 330, History and Civilization of the Spanish-speaking World, 4 Units

This course introduces students to the history and civilization of Spain and Latin America. Class is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: WRIT 204. Recommended: SPAN 301

SPAN 332, Literary Masters, 4 Units

This course equips students with a detailed understanding of select outstanding Spanish and Latin American literary works and the great authors who wrote them. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 202

SPAN 415, Politics and Society in Latin America, 3 Units

Students in this course study political and social themes from across contemporary Latin America, equipping students to become active global citizens. Specific topics vary. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 202. SPAN 330 recommended

SPAN 420, Public Speaking in Spanish, 3 Units

Students in this course study oral communication in Spanish, learning how to speak with professionalism in the language, as well as how to research, outline, and deliver speeches and presentations. Meets the General Education Requirement: Oral Communication. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 202. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 421, Survey of Spanish Literature, 3 Units

The development of literature from El Cid and the recently discovered jarchas through the 20th century is reviewed. This is a survey course which acquaints students with the major periods of Spanish literature and the outstanding writers of Spain. The class is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 422, Survey of Latin American Literature, 3 Units

This course begins with pre-Columbian literature in Latin America and continues through the present day. It is intended as a survey of prominent authors and their works. The class is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 431, Spanish Language Poetry and Short Story, 3 Units

An introduction to exemplary poetry and short stories of Spanish and/or Spanish American authors is provided. Several works are explored in-depth during the course. Actual title may vary from term to term.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 440, Spanish Applied Linguistics, 3 Units

A study of the basic components of language (sounds, word structures, grammatical patterns, and meaning constructions), error analysis, and contrastive analysis in Spanish is offered. The course includes a review of Spanish dialectical differences, their origins, and social implications.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 450, Spanish Language Pedagogy, 3 Units

Analysis and discussion of second-language acquisition theory, and the various instructional strategies, technologies, materials, and assessment techniques in Spanish teaching and learning are covered.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 460, Writing 3: Survey of the Literature of the Spanish-Speaking World, 4 Units

This course offers an overview of the progressive evolution of the Hispanic literary tradition, introducing the major authors and movements up to the 20th century. It builds on the skills developed in Writing 1 and Writing 2, teaching students how to write professional-quality scholarly articles in the field of Hispanic literary history. Class is conducted in Spanish. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: WRIT 204. SPAN 330 and SPAN 332 recommended.

SPAN 480, Spanish Capstone Seminar, 3 Units

This course gives students the opportunity to reflect upon, reinterpret, and organize the linguistic, cultural, and literary information they have pursued throughout previous semesters. In concert with the professor, a complete overview of each student's language experience within the program helps define the direction of their individualized study for the semester. Such study culminates in a personally designed Capstone Seminar project. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 460 or department approval.

SPAN 494, Internship, 3 Units

For students planning to teach Spanish, this course provides an opportunity for directed experiences in applying foreign language skills to specific tasks. The tasks are arranged individually and supervised directly by the instructor. Tasks are geared to the individual goals of the student. Enrollment is contingent upon department approval and requires the independent study petition process through One Stop I Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201 and SPAN 202

SPAN 495, Special Topics in Spanish, 3 Units

This course allows offerings of diverse topics in Hispanic studies that are not covered by other required department courses. Special interests of faculty and students may be targeted under this category. Culture, politics, and translation are examples of special topics. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: SPAN 421 or SPAN 422

SPAN 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

MODL 101, Modern Language I, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical communication skills for beginners in a language that is not normally offered by the department. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces cultural aspects. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

MODL 102, Modern Language II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical communication skills for beginners in a language that is not normally offered by the department. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces cultural aspects. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: MODL 101 of the same language, or appropriate score on language placement exam.

MODL 250, Self-Directed Language Study, 1-3 Units

This is the first semester of a self-directed language study course which requires dedicated individual effort on the part of the students, because the course progresses at an accelerated pace. Students meet with the professor prior to signing up for the course in order to determine goals, method of study, required personal discipline, responsibilities, and schedule of periodic meetings with the professor. Thus, prior acceptance by the professor is required.

Prerequisite: Completed general studies language requirement and Junior/Senior standing or instructor consent

MODL 251, Self-Directed Language Study II, 1-3 Units

This is the second semester of a self-directed language study course which requires dedicated individual effort on the part of the students as the course progresses at an accelerated pace. Students meet with the professor prior to signing up for the course in order to determine goals, method of study, required personal discipline, responsibilities, and schedule of periodic meetings with the professor. Thus, prior acceptance by the professor is required.

Prerequisite: MODL 250 (in the same language), and junior/senior standing or instructor consent

MODL 495, Special Topics in Modern Languages, 3 Units

This course presents topics not covered by regular department courses. Course may be repeated as topics change for up to 6 units toward graduation.

ASL 101, American Sign Language I, 4 Units

Lecture, 3 hours; Discussion, 1 hour: American Sign Language is offered for students interested in learning basic ASL linguistic structure, vocabulary, and conversational strategies and understanding deaf culture. Classes meet four hours weekly. Two semesters of the same language are required to meet the General Education requirement.

ASL 102, American Sign Language II, 4 Units

Lecture, 3 hours; Discussion, 1 hour: This is the second semester course of American Sign Language in a sequence that continues the study of structure, vocabulary, and conversational strategies of ASL as it is used within deaf culture. Two semesters of the same language are required to meet the General Education requirement. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: ASL 101 or instructor consent (proficiency determined by instructor-administered assessment)

CHIN 101, Elementary Chinese I, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Chinese communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

CHIN 102, Elementary Chinese II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Chinese communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: CHIN 101, or appropriate score on language placement exam.

FREN 101, Elementary French I, 3 Units

This is the first in a two-course sequence emphasizing practical French communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the French-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

FREN 102, Elementary French II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical French communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the French-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: FREN 101, or appropriate score on language placement test.

FREN 201, Intermediate French I, 3 Units

This two-course sequence is a continuation of FREN 101/ FREN 102, and consists of a thorough review of grammar, expansion of students' vocabulary, conversation practice, and a variety of guided writing experiences. Related cultural media and literary excerpts are integrated into the course.

Prerequisite: FREN 101, FREN 102, or an appropriate French CLEP Exam score, or department consent

FREN 202, Intermediate French II, 3 Units

This course is a continuation of FREN 201.

Prerequisite: FREN 201, or an appropriate French CLEP Exam score, or department consent

FREN 301, Advanced French Conversation, 3 Units

This courses optimizes students' conversation ability, reinforcing grammatical structures and emphasizing communication skills and stylistics.

Prerequisite: FREN 202

FREN 311, The French-speaking World, 3 Units

This course surveys the histories and cultures of the various French-speaking societies of the world, with primary emphasis upon 20th-century France. The class is conducted in French.

Prerequisite: FREN 202

FREN 320, Advanced French Composition, 3 Units

In this writing course, students learn composition techniques and creative writing in the French language. Various writing styles are covered.

Prerequisite: FREN 202

FREN 495, Special Topics in French, 3 Units

This course allows offerings of diverse topics in French studies that are not covered by other required department courses. Special interests of faculty and students may be targeted under this category. Literature, art, historical events, and cultural movements are examples of special topics. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: FREN 202

GERM 101, Elementary German I, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical German communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the German-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

GERM 102, Elementary German II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical German communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the German-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: GERM 101, or appropriate score on language placement exam.

GERM 201, Intermediate German I, 3 Units

This two-course sequence is a continuation of GERM 101/ GERM 102, and consists of a thorough review of grammar, expansion of students' vocabulary, conversation practice, and a variety of guided writing experiences. Related cultural media and literary excerpts are integrated into the course.

Prerequisite: GERM 101, GERM 102, an appropriate German CLEP Exam score, or department consent

GERM 202, Intermediate German II, 3 Units

This course is a continuation of GERM 201.

Prerequisite: GERM 201, or an appropriate German CLEP Exam score, or department consent

JAPA 101, Elementary Japanese I, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Japanese communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces the cultural world of Japan. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

JAPA 102, Elementary Japanese II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Japanese communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces the cultural world of Japan. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: JAPA 101, or appropriate score on language placement exam.

Faculty

Department Chair

Richard Robison, PhD, TESOL

Professors

Tasha Bleistein, PhD, TESOL

Michael Chamberlain, PhD, ALCI

Nori Henk, PhD, Sociology

Richard Robison, PhD, TESOL

Mary Shepard Wong, PhD, TESOL

Associate Professors

David Miyahara, PhD, Sociology

César Aroldo Solórzano, PhD

Adjunct Faculty

Denzil Barnett, MEd, TESOL

Michael Itagaki, MA, Sociology

Abigail Kleier, MA, TESOL

Lisa Lee, MA, MDiv, TESOL

Manar Metry, MA, TESOL

Erin Thorp, MA, TESOL

Terri Ubovich, MA, Sociology

Merari Weber, EdD, TESOL

Professors Emeriti

Richard Christopherson, PhD, Sociology

Paul Hertig, PhD, Global Studies

Carrie Peirce, PhD, Sociology

Richard Slimbach, PhD, Global Studies