Department of History and Political Science

With an intentional focus on scholarship, faith integration, diversity, and internationalization, APU provides high-quality academic programs within a tight-knit community of disciples and scholars.

Mission Statement

The Department of History and Political Science at Azusa Pacific University:

  1. Offers undergraduate degree programs in political science, history, international relations, and social science, a graduate degree program in public administration, and a single subject waiver for a teaching credential in social science.
  2. Provides General Education courses in history and political science consistent with the outcomes of a liberal arts education.
  3. Prepares students for graduate study, law school, and success in their chosen careers.

Department Overview

This department offers majors in history, international relationspolitical science, and social science, and minors in classics, historyinternational relationspolitical science, prelaw, and public administration. The department is also home to chapters of the national political science honor society, Pi Sigma Alpha; the national history honor society, Phi Alpha Theta; and the international legal community honor society, Phi Delta Phi.

Many courses in the department emphasize the reading of classic texts or the study of primary sources. All courses offered in the department are within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and are designed to contribute to a Christian liberal arts education.

The department’s programs strive to:

  • Develop intellectual curiosity.
  • Equip students with the abilities to write and speak well, think critically, and judge wisely.
  • Enable students to distinguish justice from injustice.
  • Teach students the legitimate purposes and necessary limits of political power.
  • Provide students historical perspective for making judgments in the present.
  • Instruct students in human possibilities and limits.
  • Prepare students for careers calling for clear, cogent reasoning.
  • Familiarize students with other cultures and times.
  • Make available to students the knowledge that is needed by citizens and political leaders.
  • Prepare students to teach various social science disciplines.

Students who want to earn up to 9 units in their major through the American Studies Program in Washington, DC, may do so by arrangement with the Department of History and Political Science.

HIST 120, World Civilizations to 1648, 3 Units

This survey course deals with the customs, cultures, religions, and forms of government of peoples from ancient times to 1648. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HIST 121, World Civilizations Since 1648, 3 Units

Lecture 3 hours; discussion 1 hour. This survey course deals with the customs, cultures, religions, and forms of government of peoples from 1648 to the present. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HIST 151, United States History to 1877, 3 Units

This course surveys the political and cultural history of the United States up to 1877. Areas of study include concepts of government and analysis of political institutions. This course meets the state requirement in U.S. history and government. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HIST 152, United States History Since 1877, 3 Units

This course surveys the political and cultural history of the United States from 1877 to the present. Areas of study include concepts of government and analysis of political institutions. This course meets the state requirement in U.S. history and government. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HIST 200, The Varieties of History, 3 Units

This course introduces students to various approaches to the study and philosophy of the discipline of history, from the ancient to the contemporary and from different cultural perspectives. Particular attention is paid to Christian approaches to the study and meaning of the human story.

Prerequisite: Recommended: Any 100-level history course.

HIST 201, World Civilizations and Geography to 1648, 3 Units

This survey course incorporates human geography as a crucial means to understand the narrative of histories, religions, migrations, and forms of government of people and civilizations from the ancient times to 1648. In doing so, this course aims to study the distribution, processes, and effects of the human population on our planet during this time period.

Prerequisite: Liberal Studies Majors Only

HIST 202, United States History to 1930, 3 Units

This course surveys the political and cultural history of the United States from its colonial origins to 1930. Subject matter includes concepts of government and analysis of political institutions. This course meets the state requirements in U.S. history and government.

Prerequisite: Liberal Studies Majors Only

HIST 210, World Geography, 3 Units

This course is a study of cultural, historical, and political geography. It includes study of the ways people interact with their natural environments, the ways different cultures interact with one another, the global patterns of human migration and settlement, and the distinctive natural, linguistic, cultural, and political features of different regions of the world.

HIST 235, Cultural History/Travel Study, 3 Units

This interdisciplinary course combines visits of major cultural and historical sites with academic study of the geography, history, art, literature, politics, and religion of the respective country, region, or continent. The course is taught by one or more faculty and developed around a history core from which each student may choose to develop an intensive focus upon art and architecture, history, literature, politics, or Church history. May be repeated for credit as topics/locations vary. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

HIST 238, History of California, 3 Units

Students in this course learn about the exploration, colonization, and development of Hispanic California; the coming of the Americans; and the political, economic, and cultural development of California since its acquisition by the United States.

HIST 300, Writing 3: Introduction to Historical Studies, 3 Units

This course instruct students in historical methodology, focusing on the skills necessary for historical research and writing, and a foundational knowledge of historiography. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2

HIST 311, Ancient Greece, 3 Units

This course is designed to introduce students to the laws, religions, art and architecture, philosophy, and governmental forms of Ancient Greece. Covers Myceanean Greece, Classical Sparta and Athens, Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, the Rise of Macedon, Alexander and the Hellenistic world, and the Greek experience under Roman rule.

HIST 312, Ancient Rome, 3 Units

This course is designed to introduce students to the laws, religions, art and architecture, philosophy, and governmental forms of Ancient Rome. Covers Republican and Imperial Rome, the Pax Romana, 3rd Century Crisis, and the Christianization and Fall of Rome.

HIST 320, Modern Africa, 3 Units

This course explores the political, social, cultural, and religious history of Africa from the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present.

Prerequisite: HIST 120 or HIST 121 recommended

HIST 325, Topics in French History, 3 Units

This variable-topics course examines a select topic or theme of French history, and the relationship of France to the world. The course may be repeated for credit, as the topic varies. Taking a 100-level history course or FREN 101 prior to this course is recommended.

Prerequisite: 100-Level History course or FREN 101 recommended

HIST 334, History of American Foreign Affairs, 3 Units

This course is a study of American foreign affairs and international relations from 1776 to the present.

HIST 335, Cultural History/Travel Study, 3 Units

This cultural history course combines visits of major cultural and historical sites with academic study of the geography, history, art, literature, politics, and religion of the country, region, or continent. The interdisciplinary course is taught by a team of two to four faculty and developed around a history core, from which each student may choose to develop an intensive focus upon art and architecture, history, literature, politics, or church history.

HIST 338, History of California, 3 Units

Students learn about the exploration, colonization, and development of Hispanic California; the coming of the Americans; and the political, economic, and cultural development of California since its acquisition by the United States.

HIST 342, The American West, 3 Units

This course offers coverage of the exploration and development of the West, mining and stock-raising frontiers, railroads, and agriculture, and the effects of the frontier on American institutions.

HIST 346, History of American Immigration, 3 Units

This course examines immigration and ethnicity in America from the Colonial period to the present. Themes include ethnic formation, assimilation, nativism, and the relationship of ethnicity to American national identity. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

HIST 350, Medieval Europe, 3 Units

This course is a study of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance.

HIST 352, Renaissance and Reformation, 3 Units

This course is a study of Europe from the 15th century to 1648. It covers intellectual, social, and political changes, and religious revolt and wars.

HIST 357, Enlightenment Europe, 3 Units

This course studies European history from 1648-1789. The course focuses on the intellectual and cultural movement known as the Enlightenment and its effects on politics, diplomacy, economics, society, and religion.

HIST 358, Europe 1789-1914, 3 Units

This course studies European political, intellectual, social, diplomatic, and religious history from the French Revolution to the start of World War I.

HIST 359, Europe 1914-1992, 3 Units

This course studies European political, intellectual, social, diplomatic, and religious history from World War I to the fall of the Soviet Union.

HIST 360, History of the Middle East I: Early and Medieval Islam, 3 Units

This course covers the historical foundations of the premodern Middle East beginning with the pre-Islamic Near East and Arabia and continuing with Muhammad and the origins of the Islamic tradition; the establishment of regional Islamic rule, ideology, and institutions; and the medieval dynasties up to and including the Ottomans. The course primarily focuses on general political narrative, but also considers social and cultural dynamics of the early and medieval Islamic world.

HIST 361, History of the Middle East II: Modern Middle East, 3 Units

This course covers the historical foundations of the early modern and modern Middle East, beginning with later Ottoman history (18th century) and continuing through to the present day. It covers a variety of countries/communities within the region, including Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, and Israel/Palestine, and it also includes a variety of topics within this chronological and geographical expanse, such as nationalisms, ideologies, social movements, and cultural identity.

HIST 365, History of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, 3 Units

This course covers the historical dynamics of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the beginnings of early Zionist thought and settlement in the late 19th century to the present day.

HIST 368, A Year in Time, 3 Units

Taking a global approach, this course examines the political, intellectual, cultural, social, diplomatic, and religious developments of one specific year in history. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of primary resources in historical research and writing. The course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic or year studied

HIST 374, Colonial Era, 3 Units

This course is a study of the English colonies in America during 1609-1776. Themes include institutions, life, and customs, intercolonial relations, imperial control; and the movement for independence.

HIST 376, The Revolution and the Republic, 3 Units

This course examines major topics in the history of the United States between the American Revolution and the early antebellum period, paying special attention to the impact of political development on religion, culture, and economic systems, and gender, ethnic, and racial interactions.

HIST 380, Civil War and Reconstruction, 3 Units

This course is a study of the causes of sectional conflict, the Civil War, and political, social, and economic reconstruction (1850-77).

HIST 382, Emergence of Modern America, 3 Units

This course is a study of the period 1878-1918, including political and intellectual change, the advent of big business, urbanization, reform, and the coming of World War I.

HIST 386, Modern America, 3 Units

This course is a study of the intellectual, political, economic, and social history of America from 1918 to the present.

HIST 389, Modern American Intellectual History, 3 Units

This course introduces students to some of the most important ideas, thinkers, and intellectual debates that have shaped life in the United States from the late nineteenth century through the present. Through a study of movements including pragmatism, progressivism, liberalism, and conservatism, the course examines the role of science, philosophy, and religion in providing intellectual foundations for liberal democracy. It also examines the relationship between modernity and postmodernity, and traces the growth of the American university system as a primary institutional site for intellectual life

HIST 392, Colonial Latin America, 3 Units

Utilizing primary and secondary sources, music, film, and literature, this course examines the history of Colonial America (c. 1460s-1820s), with particular emphasis on the role of Christianity in the development, success, and failure of the Spanish imperial project in the New World.

Prerequisite: HIST 120

HIST 393, Ritual and Re-enactment in Modern Latin America, 3 Units

Utilizing primary and secondary sources, music, film, and literature, this course examines the history of modern Latin America (c. 1820s-present), from its colonial legacy to its nation-building period, revolutions and coups to modern manifestations, with special emphasis on its relationship to the United States and developments in local Christianity.

Prerequisite: HIST 121

HIST 401, Humanities Seminar, 6 Units

Subject matter for this course varies. The pre-announced topic is addressed from an interdisciplinary perspective and includes some of the following: history, literature, sociology, art, religion, biblical studies, and language. Each time this course is offered it is further defined with a subtitle.

HIST 402, Historical Research Skills, 6 Units

Subject matter for this course varies. The course emphasizes one of the following: historical research skills, archaeological methods, or language study. The course includes access to primary archival resources, field experiences, and/or trips to historical sites. Each time this course is offered it is further defined with a subtitle.

HIST 403, Church History Seminar, 6 Units

Subject matter for this course varies. The course includes an intensive study of a specific era in church history. Each time this course is offered it is further defined with a subtitle.

HIST 404, Archaeology Field Experience, 6 Units

This field experience is only offered at the Wadi Natrun archaeological dig in Egypt. It includes hands-on field experience.

HIST 420, Topics in Cinema and History, 3 Units

This course explores the relationship between film and history regarding a specific historical era, studying films made at that era and about that era. Students are expected to attend weekly film screenings in addition to scheduled classes. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies.

Prerequisite: WRIT 110

HIST 484, Historical Themes, 3 Units

Subject matter for this course varies and may include topics in non-Western, European, and United States history. This course may be repeated for credit.

HIST 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This course consists of a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

HIST 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

HIST 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level capstone type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in a formal thesis, published article, electronic media, or artistic creation of a material form. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill the preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this course.

Prerequisite: HIST 300 or instructor consent, and senior standing.

HIST 499H, Thesis/Project - Honors, 3 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis and communication. The one-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, electronic media, or artistic creation of a material form. No more than one unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and upper-division writing intensive course completed. Must also be a student admitted to the Honors Collegeand be considered a member in "active" status.

HUM 201, Intercultural Knowledge and Competence, 3 Units

This course employs a team-taught, transdisciplinary approach to expanding students' intercultural knowledge and experience in three stages. First, through a study of core texts in the humanities, it studies a chronologically arranged variety of cultural perspectives on the meaning and value of the natural world. Second, it punctuates this study with affective experience in a new cultural setting (typically by visiting with a representative from local Native American or Armenian communities). Third, it requires students to reflect upon and analyze their own culturally structured environmental attitudes. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

HUM 202, Civic Knowledge and Engagement, 3 Units

This course employs a team-taught, transdisciplinary approach to expanding students' understanding of and commitment to civic engagement in three stages. First, through a study of core texts in the humanities, it examines a chronologically arranged variety of perspectives on the ethical responsibility of humans to their natural environment. Second, it punctuates this study with affective experience in the pristine Ansel Adams Wilderness, an experience that provides a hands-on encounter with the magnificently fragile world God has charged us to nurture. Finally, this course requires students to reflect upon and analyze their own civic responsibilities toward the environment through a final research project. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

HUM 221, Core Texts in History, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected classic works that shaped and represented different civilizations in a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 221 and HUM 321 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 321. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HUM 222, Core Texts in Literature, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected literary texts from a variety of cultures and genres in a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 222 and HUM 322 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 322. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

HUM 223, Core Texts in Aesthetics, 3 Units

A study of the creative process and of selected aesthetic masterpieces in a variety of cultures and genres from a specified historical era. Taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 223 and HUM 323 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 323. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Fine Arts. 

HUM 224, Core Texts in Philosophy, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected philosophical works illustrating intellectual perspectives of a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 224 and HUM 324 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 324. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Philosophy. 

HUM 321, Core Texts in History, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected classic works that shaped and represented different civilizations in a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 221 and HUM 321 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 321. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

HUM 322, Core Texts in Literature, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected literary texts from a variety of cultures and genres taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 222 and HUM 322 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 322. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

HUM 323, Core Texts in Aesthetics, 3 Units

This course offers a study of the creative process and selected aesthetic masterpieces in a variety of cultures and genres from a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 223 and HUM 323 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 323. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Fine Arts. 

HUM 324, Core Texts in Philosophy, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected philosophical works illustrating intellectual perspectives of a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. HUM 224 and HUM 324 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in HUM 324. This course may be repeated once for credit, as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Philosophy. 

HUM 325, Core Texts in Christianity, 3 Units

This course offers a study of selected Christian classics on Christian life and doctrine from a specified historical era, taught by a faculty tutor in an integrative, interdisciplinary fashion. This course may be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Meets the General Education Requirement: Theology. 

PADM 350, Theory and Practice of Public Administration, 3 Units

Course provides a detailed overview of the theoretical foundation for managing and operating federal, state and local government agencies and nonprofit organizations. Public administrators interact with politicians, community stakeholders, businesses and voters to achieve the public good. Students will examine the role of public administrators through course materials such as texts, scholarly articles, discussion questions and application to real-world scenarios in cases and guest speakers as well as online coursework.

Corequisite: PADM 399

PADM 375, Program Implementation and Evaluation, 3 Units

This course details the rationale for public programs authorized and managed by public agencies and nonprofit organizations. Public policies and management principles applied to the administration of programs are examined using the course textbook, course reader, online discussion Q&A, digital media, and assigned online coursework. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

PADM 399, Public Administration Practicum, 6-8 Units

As part of the Sacramento study away program, this course offers fieldwork internship opportunities in an area chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty director of the Azusa Pacific University Center for Public Affairs in Sacramento. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

Corequisite: PADM 350

PADM 501, Origin of Public Administration, 3 Units

In this introductory course for preservice and midcareer individuals, students learn the theory and practice of public administration. Course material includes an exploration of ethical dilemmas influencing the daily tasks of public administrators, with an emphasis on the core public administration values of accountability, integrity, and leadership and evidence-based decision making for effective and efficient public policy program implementation. Coursework involves textbooks, lectures, discussions, and case studies of application to professional settings to assist managers with problem solving and promote responsive, faithful service that helps vulnerable and diverse populations in our communities.

PADM 502, Organizations and Behavior, 3 Units

Students in this course review public management research, theories, and perspectives that help practitioners assess the issues and challenges of working with people, technologies, and policies to accomplish goals. Students also critique modern public management strategies and behaviors to solve real-world problems. Instructional materials are interdisciplinary (psychology, public administration, political science) and include articles, cases, electronic resources, student experiences, and collaborative discussions to analyze, develop, and communicate ethical evaluative skills that promote management solutions aligned with the values of APU's Four Cornerstones.

PADM 503, The Policy Process, 3 Units

This course offers an in-depth study of the public policy process (analysis, promulgation of statutory laws and administrative rules) and value-based implementation. Public administrators in public, nonprofit, and private organizations must interact with political leaders, administrative staff, and diverse community groups to ensure the implementation of necessary policy programs and services, and that these are accessible to people in need. Coursework involves textbooks, scholarly materials, lectures, discussions, and case assignments.

PADM 504, Economic and Urban Development, 3 Units

This course prepares students for public-sector organization management. Students learn about community development programs, municipal budgeting and expenditures, grants administration, joint powers agreements, public-private partnerships, nonprofit organizations, fiscal management policies, and county, state, and municipal government economic development programs.

PADM 505, Public Sector Research Methods, 3 Units

This course is for preservice and midcareer professionals who use research and data as evidence in public administration to advocate for resources, make effective ethical leadership decisions, and implement and evaluate programs. The importance of research in the policy implementation process and in programs run by public and nonprofit managers is examined.

Prerequisite: PADM 501, PADM 502, PADM 503, and PADM 504.

PADM 506, Ethical Leadership and Management, 3 Units

This course helps leaders in public, nonprofit, and private organizations sharpen their leadership skills. Emphasis is on strategies and tactics used daily by management professionals tasked with achieving agency mission and goals for the common good. Analytical and critical thinking skills are improved by evaluating principles, theories, and best practices for leading and collaborating with diverse community stakeholders. Course materials (discussions, research, lectures) and case studies of real-world problems emphasize strategies, theories and tactics used daily by faithful, efficient and effective management professionals and community leaders.

PADM 510, California's Public Healthcare System [Proposed], 3 Units

The State of California has 21 publicly funded health care systems that support individuals and families regardless of their ability to pay. These systems comprise only six percent of the state's hospitals, but provide more than 40 percent of hospital care to the uninsured. Course provides detailed discussion and instruction about public health systems and federal, state, county and municipal government systems management. Publicly funded health care providers are studied in the course by using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 511, Federal Health Insurance Policy (Implementation and Administration) [Proposed], 3 Units

CalPERS is the nation's largest public pension fund and serves more than 1.9 million members in the retirement system and 1.5 million members in their health care program. Course provides detailed discussion and instruction about CalPERS and public pension programs are examined using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 512, Healthcare Administration, 3 Units

This course covers the foundations of healthcare administration in the United States, introducing students to the structure and function of the healthcare system. Topics include theory and models of healthcare administration, public policy impacts and scarcity, partnerships and achieving equality in healthcare governance at the national, state, and local levels, community environments, and critical issues in health services. Students explore Christian faith-based alternatives for alleviating healthcare burdens, and conduct a community health system analysis.

Prerequisite: Permission of MPA director for students not enrolled in the MPA program.

PADM 513, Community Health and the Built Environment (State/Local) [Proposed], 3 Units

Creating a neighborhood serving built environment that encourages positive public health outcomes results in major policy issues for federal, state, and local government managers and elected officials. Municipal planning departments must manage the development of parks, business centers, malls, and historically preserved landmarks. In addition to the elimination of brownfields, the construction of new rail lines for high-speed transit, and provision of quality water sources for distribution to local residents. Course provides detailed discussion and instruction regarding the public sector management of legislative initiatives regarding public health and land use using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 514, Communicating Public Policy [Proposed], 3 Units

Government communication to citizens evolved due to the creation of social media. Elected officials, department managers, state and federal agencies continue to experience challenges when attempting to communicate public policy to citizens effectively. This course examines the competitive environment governments must now compete in against businesses and nonprofits, when trying to reach everyday citizens and registered voters. Course provides detailed discussion and instruction regarding effectively communicating public policy using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 515, Social Media/Digital Media and the Public Sector [Proposed], 3 Units

Social Media is a major communication channel for businesses and individuals that are designated "influencers" for products and lifestyle brands. Many public sector organizations use social media as an opportunity to enhance citizen engagement in political and social affairs. Course provides detailed discussion and instruction regarding social media, privacy and brand representation using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 516, The Press and Politics [Proposed], 3 Units

Media influence partly shaped the development of American government. National news coverage, local newspapers and social media can greatly influence public opinion and can very much influence the viability of controversial policy proposals and elections. Course provides detailed discussion and instruction regarding mass media, elected officials and public policies that affect government program implementation using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 517, Field Report (Independent Study) [Proposed], 3 Units

Course is a mandated field study requirement for students completing their capstone concentration through use of communication strategies and tactics that advance practice in local government.

PADM 518, Public-Private Partnerships (Economic Development) [Proposed], 3 Units

Public infrastructure investments are opportunities for private investors that seek to do business with government. Public-Private Partnerships or P3 projects are supplemented by businesses and investors that seek returns through the collection of fees and other assessments that are paid by taxpayers. Course provides detailed discussion and instruction pertinent to P3 projects in major U.S. cities and local impact using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 519, Small Business Administration and State/Local Government [Proposed], 3 Units

The United States Small Business Administration (SBA) was created through the adoption of the Small Business Act of 1953. The legislative design for this program includes the delivery of loans, loan guarantees, contracts, counseling sessions and assistance to small businesses. Course provides a detailed discussion and instruction pertinent to SBA activities that encourage the creation of small businesses in U.S. cities and examines the SBA California State Trade Expansion Program (California STEP) using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 520, Education and Workforce Development Policy Administration [Proposed], 3 Units

The Workforce Investment and Opportunity Act (WIOA) provides resources to local government for job training and placement programs. WIOA supersedes the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) and amends the Wagner-Peyser Act, the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.Course provides a detailed discussion and instruction pertinent to the design and implementation of Workforce Investment Boards, Employment Development Department activities and workforce development initiatives in urban and rural cities using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 521, Federal Health Insurance Policy (Implementation and Administration) [Proposed], 3 Units

The Small Business Health Care Tax Credit and Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP) help businesses provide health coverage to their employees. Reproductive rights and cost of care subsidies are major policy issues for private and other employers. Course provides detailed discussion and instruction about health care initiatives for small businesses in urban and rural cities using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 522, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in the Public Sector, 3 Units

This introductory course equips preservice and midcareer individuals with the geographical and spatial intelligence and skills required in most public administration positions. Knowledge of data analysis and of relationships (size, shape, and location) between geographic points of interest are powerful tools to help with descriptive analysis and planning in the social environment. Students acquire the basic geographic information systems (GIS) tools for analyzing, describing, and managing programs essential to public health, environmental science, criminal justice, and business as well as public administration.

PADM 523, Big Data and Elections (Polling/Statistics) [Proposed], 3 Units

Individual privacy and the political process are major issues in the United States of America. Public sector organizations are responsible for managing the collection of data for use during local and state elections. This course provides a detailed discussion about the electoral process and the use of data for elections and polling activities conducted by major universities and media networks using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 524, Smart Cities and Workforce Development [Proposed], 3 Units

Autonomous vehicles drone municipal departments for enforcement related activities and for public works utilize technology and artificial intelligence. This course provides a detailed discussion regarding the evolution of smart cities and policy implications resulting for local government adaption to digital management tactics using course textbook, journal articles, lecture discussion examples, Q&A discussion board assignments and assigned online coursework.

PADM 525, Field Report: Spatial or Statistical Analysis of a Public Challenge (Moral Hazard) [Proposed], 3 Units

Course is a mandated field study requirement for students completing their capstone concentration through use of spatial analysis and application of regional science.

PADM 599, Readings in Public Administration, 1-3 Units

This course is an independent study vehicle through which students and their sponsoring faculty members may pursue approved investigations beyond those provided within regular course offerings.

PADM 600A, Public Administration Capstone A, 3 Units

This course offers credit for fieldwork in an area chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty director of the Azusa Pacific University Center for Public Affairs in Sacramento. The 6-unit public administration capstone (parts A and B combined) is required for completion of the Master of Public Administration degree.

Prerequisite: Second-year good standing in the MPA program.

PADM 600B, Public Administration Capstone B, 3 Units

This course offers credit for fieldwork in an area chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty director of the Azusa Pacific University Center for Public Affairs in Sacramento. The 6-unit public administration capstone (parts A and B combined) is required for completion of the Master of Public Administration degree.

Prerequisite: Second-year good standing in the MPA program.

POLI 150, American Government, 3 Units

This course is a study of the institutions and processes of American government on the local, state, and national levels. This course meets the state requirement for U.S. history and government. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

POLI 160, Introduction to Politics, 3 Units

This course introduces the beginning political science student to the fundamental themes and enduring problems of political life.

POLI 180, Intro to International Relations, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the academic study of international relations, beginning with classical discussions about the interaction of peoples, continuing to focus on modern nations and their trade, diplomacy, foreign aid and conflicts. Students will consider the challenges faced within particular world regions beyond the West, with units on Latin America, Africa, Asia, Middle East, and their particular regional opportunities. Also covered are particular problems of international relations of our time - nuclear/chemical/biological weapons, terrorism, and cyber conflict, as well as international opportunities including strategies to achieve greater economic development, trade, and communication.

POLI 210, Current Events, 3 Units

Students explore selected current domestic and foreign policy issues.

POLI 220, State and Local Government, 3 Units

This course offers a comparison of the organizations, processes, and functions of local government in the United States, including counties, cities, and special districts.

POLI 250, Introduction to Criminal Law, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the concepts of criminal law, including history and development, constitutional limitations on crimes and punishment, principles of criminal liability, criminal defenses, inchoate crimes, and elements of crimes against persons, property, and habitation.

POLI 260, Introduction to Legal Transactions, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of personal and business legal transactions, introducing students to the importance of the law, concepts of business formation and transactions, corporations, contracts, intellectual property, cyberlaw, employment law, bankruptcy, and estate planning.

POLI 271, Political Topics, 3 Units

Subject matter for this course varies and may include topics in political theory, American government, and international affairs. Possible topics include: nuclear arms, religion and politics, and presidential elections. POLI 271 and POLI 471 may not be taken concurrently, and additional work is required in POLI 471. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Up to eight units may be earned for participation in seminars offered by the American Studies Program.

POLI 300, Writing 3: Research and Writing, 3 Units

This writing-intensive course emphasizes the research and writing skills common to the disciplines of history and political science. It is strongly recommended that students take this course before taking any other 300- or 400-level history or political science courses. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2

POLI 310, Political Geography, 3 Units

This course considers the impact of geography on political life broadly understood, including population and migration, governments and political institutions, national boundaries and border conflicts, economic development, trade and cultural relations between nations and peoples, and the development and future of the nation.

POLI 320, Comparative Politics, 3 Units

This course offers a comparative study of major political systems. The communist, socialist, and democratic systems are compared as they have been applied in various states.

POLI 325, Seminar in International Relations, 3 Units

This course facilitates focused inquiry into one or more pre-announced subjects relating to current international relations. Possible topics include nuclear weapons, cybersecurity, or humanitarian relief assistance. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or instructor's consent

POLI 350, Constitutional Law: Fundamental Freedoms, 3 Units

This course analyzes U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to constitutional civil rights and liberties found in the Bill of Rights and 14th Amendment, including freedoms of speech, press, religion, assembly; the right to bear arms; due process and equal protection; and political rights related to representation, voting, and naturalization.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor consent

POLI 351, Constitutional Law: Criminal Justice, 3 Units

The course analyzes U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to the constitutional protections offered to criminal defendants found in the Bill of Rights and 14th Amendment, including the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures, the privilege against self-incrimination, the right to counsel, the right to a jury trial, the protection against excessive bail and cruel and unusual punishment, and other due process guarantees.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor consent

POLI 352, Constitutional Law: National Powers, 3 Units

This course is an inquiry into the Supreme Court's interpretation of the Constitution concerning the powers of the states, the president, Congress, and the courts.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor consent

POLI 353, Seminar on Legal Studies, 3 Units

This course is a study of forms of law school writing, the profession of the law, and the philosophy of law as it has developed from ancient to contemporary times. The course is primarily for students intending to pursue a career in law and should ideally be taken by students in their junior year.

Prerequisite: POLI 350 or POLI 351 or POLI 352 or instructor consent

POLI 360, Classical Political Thought, 3 Units

This course is a study of ancient Greek political thought with some reference to Roman and medieval political thought. The course focuses on ideas of justice, nature, and human nature.

POLI 363, Modern Political Thought, 3 Units

This course is a study of major political thinkers from the 16th century to the present.

POLI 376, The American Founding, 3 Units

This is a study of the central ideas of American constitutional democracy as they are illuminated in selected writings of the American founders and in modern contemporary scholarship on the American founding.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 and POLI 160 or instructor consent

POLI 380, Terrorism and Counterterrorism, 3 Units

This course considers the sources, history, and motivations behind terrorism, the tools and tactics employed by terrorists, and terrorist organizations' political objectives, with emphasis on recent and current terrorism. Students also consider the phenomenon of state terrorism, the theory and practice of counterterrorism, and the variety of Christian responses to terrorism.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or POLI 160

POLI 381, Theories of International Relations, 3 Units

This course is a detailed examination of the major classical, modern, and postmodern theoretical schools of thought that inform the study of International Relations. Readings include original classic treatises and monograph length statements of theory, alongside recent publications.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or Instructor consent

POLI 382, Diplomacy and Foreign Policy, 3 Units

This course provides a comprehensive examination of theoretical approaches to the analysis of foreign policy, as well as an examination of the conduct of U.S. diplomacy abroad. Case studies are used to illustrate analytical models, and active learning through team-based simulation emphasizes the practical aspects of negotiation and statecraft.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or instructor's consent

POLI 383, National Security, 3 Units

This course addresses the definition and pursuit of national security by means of a thorough-going review of essential offices and institutions, assessing the relevant policymaking process, exploring principles of strategic theory, and defining symmetric and asymmetric security threats.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or instructor's consent

POLI 385, Politics of Developing Countries, 3 Units

This course considers the governmental structures and political orientation of developing countries and the essential theories devised respecting their political past, present, and future.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

POLI 390, History and Politics of the Non-Western World, 3 Units

This course offers an overview of historical and political patterns in one pre-announced selected area of the non-Western developing world. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies.

POLI 399, Political Science Practicum, 1-8 Units

This practicum gives credit for field work in an area of government or law chosen by the student. The CCCU American Studies Program (see APU's Center for Global Learning and Engagement) offers internship opportunities in Washington, DC, or students may find opportunities on their own. Local opportunities include federal, state, and local government agencies and legislative offices, political campaigns, and law offices. Up to 8 units may be earned. Only 6 units are counted toward the political science major (3 required units; 3 units as elective credit), and 3 units toward the political science minor. All other units count as elective credit.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission required

POLI 400, Seminar on American Politics, 3 Units

This course facilitates inquiry into one pre-announced aspect of American politics, such as political parties, voting behavior, or interest groups. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor consent

POLI 405, The American Presidency, 3 Units

This course presents an overview of the American presidency, including the historical development of the presidency, contributions of individual presidents to the executive office, presidential authority and politics in the modern era, the presidential election process, and the role of the executive branch.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor consent

POLI 410, Congress, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of the functioning of Congress as an institution. Topics include the historical evolution of Congress, changes in internal rules and procedures that guide congressional action, the role of Congress within the federal system, and external influences on the legislative process.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor consent

POLI 415, The Federal Judiciary, 3 Units

This course provides an overview of the federal judicial system, with particular attention given to the power and function of the U.S. Supreme Court, methods of constitutional interpretation, judicial selection, and the role of the judiciary in the constitutional system of government.

Prerequisite: POLI 150 or instructor consent

POLI 420, Women in Politics, 3 Units

This course examines women's participation in public office at the local, regional, national, and international levels and explores potential differences between men and women in the areas of campaigning and political leadership, policy preferences, and governing styles.

Prerequisite: POLI 150

POLI 421, Regional Studies, 3 Units

This course is a comparative political analysis of a specific global region (e.g., Middle East, Eastern Europe, East Asia, Central America, etc.), with empirical emphases on the region's political history, forms of government, security problems, and cultural dynamics. As regions covered will vary, the course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or instructor's consent

POLI 422, International Organizations, 3 Units

This course examines the variety of modern international organizations, and their respective missions and operations. Organizations with legal, security, economic, health, civil-society, and judicial portfolios are considered.

Prerequisite: POLI 180 or instructor's consent

POLI 450, Principles and Practice of Research Design, 3 Units

This course presents a fundamental overview of the principles and practice of political science research design. Topics include introduction to scientific inquiry, research design construction, ethical principles, modes of observation, types of data analysis, and reading and writing social research.

Prerequisite: POLI 300 or upper division writing intensive course

POLI 471, Political Topics, 3 Units

Subject matter for this course varies and may include topics in political theory, American government, and international affairs. Possible topics include: foundations of liberty, nuclear arms, religion and politics, and presidential elections. This course may be repeated for credit, as the topic varies.

POLI 496, Senior Seminar: Religion and Politics, 3 Units

This seminar focuses on the ethical, political, and historical implications of ideas in their historical context and in contemporary society. Students consider significant ideas and concepts, their integration and interaction with other disciplines and the Christian faith, and consider application of those ideas to current political, social or moral problems. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing, completion of Writing 3 (HIST 300 or POLI 300).

POLI 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

POLI 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

POLI 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, electronic media, or artistic creation of a material form. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Upper-division writing intensive course or instructor consent; and junior or senior standing

PRHI 120, World Civilizations to 1648, 3 Units

This survey course deals with the customs, cultures, religions, and forms of government of peoples from ancient times to 1648. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

PRHI 121, World Civilizations Since 1648, 3 Units

This survey course deals with the customs, cultures, religions, and forms of government of peoples from 1648 to the present. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

PRHI 151, United States History to 1877, 3 Units

This course surveys the political and cultural history of the United States up to 1865. Areas of study include concepts of government and analysis of political institutions. This course meets the state requirement in U.S. history and government. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: History. 

PRPO 150, American Government, 3 Units

This course is a study of the institutions and processes of American government on the local, state, and national levels. This course meets the state requirement for U.S. history and government. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

PRPO 250, Introduction to Criminal Law, 3 Units

This course introduces students to the concepts of criminal law, including history and development, constitutional limitations on crimes and punishment, principles of criminal liability, criminal defenses, inchoate crimes, and elements of crimes against persons, property, and habitation.

PRPO 350, Constitutional Law: Fundamental Freedoms, 3 Units

This course analyzes U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to constitutional civil rights and liberties found in the Bill of Rights and 14th Amendment, including freedoms of speech, press, religion, assembly; the right to bear arms; due process and equal protection; and political rights related to representation, voting, and naturalization.

Prerequisite: PRPO 150 or instructor's consent

PRPO 380, Studies of Terrorism, 3 Units

This course considers the sources, history, and motivations behind terrorism, the tools and tactics employed by terrorists, and terrorist organizations' political objectives, with emphasis on recent and current terrorism. Students also consider the phenomenon of state terrorism, the theory and practice of counterterrorism, and the variety of Christian responses to terrorism.

Prerequisite: PRPO 150 or POLI 160

Faculty

Department Chair

Daniel C. Palm, Ph.D., Political Science

Professor

Daniel C. Palm, Ph.D., Political Science

Associate Professors

Kimberley Garth-James, DPA, Public Administration

Verónica Gutiérrez, MFA, Ph.D., History

Bradley Hale, Ph.D., History

Douglas Hume, JD, Political Science

Ethan Schrum, Ph.D., History

Abbylin Sellers, Ph.D., Political Science

Assistant Professor

Joshua King, Ph.D., Political Science

Adjunct Faculty

Kyu-Been Chun, M.A.

Wade Harrington, M.A.

Michael Hestrin, JD

Chris Jennings, JD

Dong-wook Lee, Ph.D.

Kenneth Leonardo, M.A.

Stephen Nelson, M.A.

Brian Plummer, Ph.D.

Faculty Emeriti

Bryan Lamkin, Ph.D., History