Department of English and Modern Languages

The Department of English and Modern Languages introduces students to significant works of the literary imagination, guides student conversational development in languages other than English, and helps students develop their composition and reading skills.

Mission

The Department of English and Modern Languages introduces students to significant works of the literary imagination, guides student conversational development in languages other than English, and helps students develop their composition and reading skills. The department also heightens their cultural sensitivity, and encourages them to read attentively, reflect deeply, write cogently, and express themselves creatively, all to glorify God and serve others.

Programs

The department offers an English major and minor, as well as an English Education concentration within the major for students interested in becoming English teachers. Also, exceptionally promising undergraduate English students may apply in their junior year for admission to the 4+1 B.A./M.A. degree program; once admitted, these students complete up to 9 units of 500-level graduate coursework during their senior year and complete the remaining 21 units of the M.A. in English program over the next academic year (fall, spring, and summer terms; e.g., 9 units in the fall term, 9 units in the spring term, 3 units in the summer term). For more information about this program, contact the department at (626) 812-3079.

Knowledge of a foreign language is another integral part of a liberal arts education, and to that end the department offers a Spanish major and minor, as well as introductory study in Chinese, French, German, and Japanese.

The M.A. in English provides professional preparation and personal enrichment to students in the field of literary studies, broadly conceived to include literature, cultural/film studies, and creative and/or professional writing. In keeping with the mission of Azusa Pacific, this program encourages an active conversation between Christianity and literature, preparing scholars, writers, and teachers for cultural engagement from a Christian perspective through the development of analytical and creative writing skills enriched by a theologically informed approach to reading, writing, teaching, and thinking about literary and other cultural texts.

Career Opportunities

Teaching is still a strong interest of many English and language majors, but equally valid are career goals in ministry, law, business, medicine, and government services. Communication areas such as advertising, technical writing, editing, publishing, and library science, or any field that requires clarity of written expression and the ability to analyze and organize effective responses, are also valid career opportunities. English majors are encouraged to double major or at least minor in a complementary field, such as business, religion, psychology, or communication, so their language skills can be applied to a different field of professional employment.

The Master of Arts in English equips students for careers in higher education, secondary school teaching, community college teaching, writing, business, government, and nonprofit organizations. The program also develops students’ ability to think critically, write persuasively, and solve problems creatively—strengths that are desirable in many career fields.

Foreign Language Proficiency General Education Requirement

Students must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language by taking the Oral Proficiency Interview by computer (OPIc), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), or Foreign Language Achievement Testing Service (FLATS) test, or by successfully completing a second-semester foreign language course. For more information regarding the proficiency requirement, contact the department or the Academic Success Center. Students under Academic Catalog 2015-16 and earlier should contact the department for a proctored placement assessment.

Language Tutoring

The Academic Success Center offers a Tutoring Center wherein students may receive supplemental practice in Spanish and other foreign languages. Contact the center for more information.

Independent Study

Self-directed language learning is available through the department. A request for a nonscheduled independent language study must be accompanied by a detailed plan and specific objectives as worked out by the student and the advisor. This arrangement is limited to upper-division students who have received department approval, and they may earn 1-3 units per semester. The petition can be obtained from the department or the Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center.

CHIN 101, Elementary Chinese I, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Chinese communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

CHIN 102, Elementary Chinese II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Chinese communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: CHIN 101, or appropriate score on language placement exam.

ENGL 99, College Reading and Critical Thinking, 2 Units

Students actively work to develop prerequisite skills needed to handle the reading demands in a college-level setting. This course is also designed to prepare the limited reader with critical reading material representing controversial issues that are commonly the subject of college debate. This course is required during the first semester for students with SAT I Verbal of 470 and below or ACT Reading at 19 and below. Credit for this course does not count toward graduation.

ENGL 100, Writing Strategies, 3 Units

Diagnostic assessment, group work, and individualized instruction are utilized in this course to improve skills in the grammatical and mechanical features of academic writing including clear, cohesive paragraphs, and essays for diverse purposes and audiences. This is a first-semester, required course for students entering with a SAT I Verbal/SAT Critical Reading score of 470 and below; or ACT English of 19 and below. Does not meet the General Education requirement for University Skills and Requirements. This course counts as elective credit.

ENGL 102, Study Skills and Strategies, 1 Unit

This course helps students become effective, efficient learners. It covers such topics as learning styles, motivational patterns, time management, test taking, study-reading, and note taking.

ENGL 111, Studies in Literature, 3 Units

This course is topically driven according to the most engaging themes, ideas, or bodies of literature, helping students develop skills in literary analysis, genre recognition, and creative expression. Students learn to read, think about, and enjoy great literary works of the past and present. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

Prerequisite: One of the following: SAT Critical Reading 480+, SAT Writing 500+, SAT Redesigned Evidence Based Reading and Writing 530+, ACT Writing 8+, ACT English 20+, TESL 102, ALCI Level 4.

ENGL 211, Film Analysis and Criticism, 3 Units

This course focuses on analyzing and writing about film as a narrative and visual medium, emphasizing the terms, methods, and techniques of film analysis. Students will write about films in terms of plot structure, character development, themes, genres, and literary sources. They will practice a variety of genres, from film reviews to film criticism and theory.

ENGL 212, Literary Critical Strategies, 3 Units

This course introduces majors to specialties within the discipline of English, as well as to literary theory and criticism, including but not limited to major approaches and theories such as Feminist Literary Theory, New Historicism, Marxist Literary Theory, Christian or Theological Approaches, and Postcolonial Theory. Special emphasis will be given to practice in close reading and the application of traditional and electronic research skills in the humanities.

ENGL 215, Introduction to Creative Writing, 3 Units

This course introduces students to poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and script writing, and what it takes to write successfully today in each of these genres. Wide reading introduces students to what is being done in each genre and facilitates writing in them. By the end of the semester, students complete a portfolio of several drafts of their work in each creative writing genre.

Prerequisite: C or above in WRIT 110

ENGL 222, English Literature to 1789, 3 Units

A chronological study of English literature from the beginning through the Neoclassical period is provided in this course. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

ENGL 224, World Literature to the Renaissance, 3 Units

In this course, students review world literature in order to broaden students' literary horizons and expand their understanding of the forms, content, and cultural contexts in which literature is written. Students discover new literatures to further explore and enjoy, and this new enjoyment sheds light on their own literary traditions. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

Prerequisite: WRIT 110

ENGL 232, English Literature Since 1789, 3 Units

English Literature Since 1789 is a 3-unit, lower-division General Education English course that provides a chronological survey of Romantic, Victorian, and Modern literature in multiple genres (poetry, fiction, drama, non-fiction), seeking to place each work in its historical and cultural context. Priority will be given to questions about the literary imagination and human culture. How does literature inspire, nourish, and sustain our search for truth, goodness, and beauty, and what difference does it make to read such literature from a thoughtful Christian perspective? This course is recommended especially for students who intend to study abroad at Oxford University. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

ENGL 234, World Literature Since the Renaissance, 3 Units

The goal of this class is to familiarize students with some major authors of literature outside of England and America, between 1500 and the present. The term World Literature is not meant to imply that there is a unitary literature of the world, but that literature is a product of all languages and cultures and therefore is worldwide phenomenon. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

Prerequisite: WRIT 110

ENGL 244, American Literature to 1865, 3 Units

This course is a survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Students examine major writers and literary movements in America through the Civil War. Topics may include colonialism, Puritanism, religious dissent, captivity narratives, slavery, abolitionism, deism, national identity, race, gender, realism, romance, self-reliance, transcendentalism, and so on. The course also examines the role of religion in American literature and literary history, as well as minority literature that has vastly expanded the literary canon. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

Prerequisite: WRIT 110

ENGL 254, American Literature Since 1865, 3 Units

This course will be a survey of American literature from the Civil War period to the present. Topics to be discussed include the Civil War; slavery and emancipation; literary movements including realism, regionalism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism; race and ethnicity; immigration and assimilation; gender and sexuality; the Great Migration; lynching; consumerism and suburbanization; globalization and transnationalism; and so on. Students will read and analyze American literature in historical context, asking whether and to what extent literary texts perform cultural work in the real world. We will also consider the role that religion has played in American literature and literary history, examining such issues as belief and unbelief, religion and secularism, pluralism and tolerance. Finally, we will study various American ethnic literatures that have vastly expanded the literary canon. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

ENGL 301, Creative Writing: Fiction, 3 Units

In a writing workshop, students read, analyze, and write prose fiction, concentrating on plot, character, setting, and theme in the short story.

ENGL 302, Creative Writing: Poetry, 3 Units

Students survey trends in the prior century's English language poetry in support of their own writing of both an analytical paper and a poetry portfolio that includes traditional and free forms.

ENGL 303, Creative Writing: Drama and Film, 3 Units

This course examines the art and craft of writing for the stage, film, or television. Students learn to analyze and evaluate their audience, their writing tasks, and their communication goals, and then match these exterior concerns of craft to their interior quest to say something meaningful to themselves and others.

ENGL 304, Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction, 3 Units

This course examines the art and technique of creative nonfiction. Students analyze fictional techniques such as plot and characterization, and learn to use them in writing about subjects of their own choosing. Some focus is given to the art of memoir as a literary genre.

ENGL 311, Film and Literature, 3 Units

This course examines similarities and differences between film and literature, with an emphasis on film as a narrative and visual medium. Using the terms, methods, and techniques of film analysis, students will analyze and write about film and literature in terms of plot structure, character development, themes, genres, and so on. Some attention is given to theories of adaptation as well as film criticism and theory.

Prerequisite: WRIT 110 or enrollment in the Honors College

ENGL 324H, World Literature to the Renaissance - Honors, 3 Units

Students review world literature from Confucius to Dante. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

ENGL 360, Technical and Professional Writing, 3 Units

This course acquaints students with the writing conventions of the professional and technical communities. It helps students understand writing as an essential analytical and communication tool in the professional world and gives them experience in writing proposals, incorporating graphics, and writing for clients to solve problems encountered in that world.

Prerequisite: WRIT 110

ENGL 361, Freelance Magazine Article Writing, 3 Units

This course provides training in writing and marketing various types of nonfiction articles in professional magazines. Students gain experience in writing such articles as book reviews, personal experience articles, personal profiles, how-to articles, devotional articles, and human interest features.

ENGL 364, American Ethnic Literature, 3 Units

This course will study American ethnic literature. Students will read works by American writers from various ethnic groups in the United States (e.g. African American, Asian American, Jewish, Chicano, and Euro-American writers who address issues of race and ethnicity). Major topics include the American Dream, literary canon formation, gender, equality, race, ethnicity, immigration, multiculturalism, assimilation/acculturation, and religion, This course is intended to give you practice in close reading and literary interpretation and to emphasize the value of literature and the reading experience. English 364 aims to expand your ability to interact with American ethnic literature through analysis, interpretation, and criticism. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: WRIT 110

ENGL 374, African American Literature, 3 Units

This course examines African American literature from its beginnings in oral tradition to the present. Selected readings vary. Topics to be addressed may include race, class, ethnicity, gender, language, slavery, equality, freedom, folklore, miscegenation, passing, pluralism, religion, segregation, syncretism, canon formation, and more.

ENGL 377, Shakespeare, 3 Units

Students in this course undertake a representative study of Shakespeare's sonnets, dramas, comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances.

Prerequisite: WRIT 110

ENGL 384, Women Writers, 3 Units

This course will enable students to read and analyze literary works by women, which have often been excluded by anthology editors and marginalized in survey courses. Students will also gain a broader understanding of the political, social, and cultural factors surrounding these writers and texts. Topics will vary, but might include Women Poets, Women Novelists, 19th Century British Women Writers, 20th Century American Women Writers, Medieval Women Writers, Women Writing Science Fiction.

Prerequisite: WRIT 110

ENGL 386, Contemporary Global Writers, 3 Units

Students will read short fiction, creative nonfiction, and novels by contemporary global writers of the 21st century. Students will examine assumptions about ethnic and national identities, immigration, cosmopolitanism, global citizenship, and literary cultures around the world. This class will consider the role and reputation of the United States and of Christianity abroad. Student will look at the literary techniques and use of point of view to create an insider's perspective into a culture.

Prerequisite: WRIT 110 or enrollment in the Honors College

ENGL 387, Contemporary Writers, 3 Units

This course introduces students to current trends in literature. Students will read short stories and novels by contemporary writers, paying special attention to the craft, structure, and literary techniques of their work. Students will develop strategies of literary analysis and may respond to these works with literary experimentation of their own at different points in the semester. In this course, we will also examine the role of Christianity in contemporary literature.

Prerequisite: WRIT 110 or Honors standing

ENGL 402, Principles of Language, 3 Units

This course provides an introductory survey of the nature and use of language: basic speech sounds, syllable structure, word formation, grammar systems, language acquisition and variation, historical aspects of language change, and their relevance to language teachers.

ENGL 404, Approaches to Grammar, 3 Units

Traditional and modern analyses of grammar are covered, providing a grounding in the traditional eight parts of speech and a grounding in the modern 12 lexical categories and their subcategories; a study of phrase, clause, and sentence types; and an overview of transformational and other modern perspectives on grammar and grammar teaching.

Prerequisite: ENGL 402

ENGL 405, American English Language History, 3 Units

A study of the origins and development of the English language within the Indo-European language family, and the growth of American English as a unique and dynamic variety among the several major offshoots of British English is the focus of this course.

Prerequisite: ENGL 404

ENGL 406, Writing 3: Advanced Composition, 3 Units

This course is especially for students contemplating teaching at the elementary or secondary level, and of interest to students wanting to learn more about their own writing processes and writing instruction. It includes direct instruction and practice in writing in various forms, examining various composition theories and practices, and observing and practicing the teaching of composition, all based on the idea that writing is best learned through writing and learning how to teach it. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2

ENGL 410, American Novel, 3 Units

Students engage in extensive reading and analysis of selected romances and novels from 1800 to the present. This course traces the development of the genre in its American form and content.

ENGL 425, Advanced Creative Writing, 3 Units

In a workshop setting, students read, write, analyze, and critique advanced work in one of the following areas: poetry, fiction, nonfiction, or playwriting/screenwriting.

Prerequisite: One of the following: ENGL 301, ENGL 302, ENGL 303, ENGL 304

ENGL 434, Children's Literature, 3 Units

Literature, classical as well as contemporary, interesting to children through adolescence and of value to all who work with children either professionally or as parents, is covered in this course.

ENGL 435, Social and Psychological Aspects of Language, 3 Units

Students engage in a study of cognitive and social aspects of language affecting acquisition and use; comprehension and use of sentences; language memory and production; political and social implications of language; social roles, bilingualism, codes, and code switching; and second-language acquisition and language planning.

ENGL 436, Adolescent Literature, 3 Units

This course is a study of literature for adolescent readers, traditionally those in the teen years. It aims to acquaint the students with both popular and enduring works and provides close critical reading of both. Criticisms of adolescent literature, as well as classroom applications for the works, are included in the class. The course is an upper-division elective in English, and of particular use to students planning to teach.

Prerequisite: WRIT 110; ENGL 111 or ENGL 212

ENGL 466, British Novel, 3 Units

Students explore the origins and development of British fiction, reading representative novels from the 18th century to the present.

ENGL 480, Contemporary Literary Criticism, 3 Units

This course explores theories about literature and critical approaches to literature. The testing of theories and the working out of the critical approaches occur through studying excerpts from selected works of literature. This course may be interesting not only to English majors, but also to students of philosophy, theology, and history, for what one learns about critical approaches to a literary text can be applied to all texts.

ENGL 486, Topics in Film Analysis, 3 Units

This course examines the terms, methods, and techniques of film analysis in the context of a special topic that varies each semester depending on the instructor (e.g., Film Noir, Images of Women in Film, Shakespeare on Film, The Western). Emphasis is on formal analysis of film language, with consideration of other critical approaches to film.

ENGL 487, Literary Movements, 3 Units

Students in this course study the literary texts, historical contexts, and critical debates of a significant literary period or movement. Course content may include exploration of corresponding cultural phenomena such as visual and performing arts, music, and film. Possible periods include Romantic, Postmodern, Classical, and Medieval. Selection varies depending on student interest and faculty availability. Repeatable once towards the literature concentration.

ENGL 488, Significant Authors, 3 Units

Students in this course undertake intensive study of one, two, or three major authors. Possible authors include Chaucer, Dickinson, Austen and Woolf, C.S. Lewis, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, and Mark Twain, among others. Selection varies depending on student interest and faculty availability. Repeatable once toward the literature concentration.

ENGL 489, Literary Topics, 3 Units

Students in this course study literary topics and genres in English, American, and world literature. Possible topics include images of women in literature, religious autobiography, science fiction, and literature of the American West, among others. Selection varies depending on student interest and faculty availability. Repeatable once toward the Literature Concentration.

ENGL 490, Writing Internship, 3 Units

This course allows for practical application of the writing skills learned in the classroom. Internships are arranged individually for students and supervised directly by the instructor. Experiences may include working for publishers, magazines, public relations firms, or other organizations in which writing is emphasized. Enrollment is contingent upon department approval. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: Instructor Consent

ENGL 491, Teaching Assistantship, 1-3 Units

The English Teaching Assistantship is a 1-3-unit, upper-division English course that provides upperclassmen with an opportunity for hands-on learning about how to plan and execute a college-level literature and/or writing course. Enrollees will be mentored one-on-one by a full-time English professor in two or more of the following tasks: Research and development of syllabi and/or lecture materials, planning and leading whole-class or small group discussion, creating and managing Student Learning Outcomes through relevant assessments, applying and/or utilizing rubrics, course-related record-keeping, and offering scaffolding to struggling students.

Prerequisite: at least 6 units of ENGL at the 200 level or above

ENGL 496, English and the Professions, 3 Units

This course is designed to help students integrate their Christian faith and values with their private and public lives as professionals in careers established for the English major, such as teaching, ministry, law, business, medicine, government service, and library science. Assigned readings, class discussions, and required essays allow students to practice skills acquired in the major and articulate faith integration. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: Writing 2

ENGL 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

Consists of a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

ENGL 498, Directed Research, 1-4 Units

This course provides instruction in research design and technique, and gives students experience in the research process. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying reading, log, writing, and seminar presentation within the department or in a university research symposium. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

ENGL 499, Thesis/Project, 1-4 Units

This is a senior-level "capstone" type of independent study/research experience, involving the student in a unique project with a sophisticated level of research, synthesis, analysis, and communication. The 1-unit expectation encompasses no fewer than 30 hours of work with accompanying readings, log, instructor discussions, and writing of summary analysis and conclusions. The thesis or project may result in formal thesis, published article, or electronic media. No more than 1 unit may be used to fulfill preparatory readings requirement. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Prerequisite: Upper-division writing intensive course or instructor consent; and junior or senior standing

ENGL 500, The Christian Imagination, 3 Units

Students in this course will explore the history of Christian Aesthetics, especially as it applies to the reading and writing of literature. They will engage with thinkers representing a broad range of historical periods, geographic locations, and faith traditions, seeking to understand various ways that Christians have understood the role of the arts in church and culture. After surveying this variety of approaches, students will begin refining their own convictions about the relationship between literature and faith and begin articulating their own sense of vocation as writers, readers, scholars, critics, and teachers. Students will respond to the extensive reading in this class by writing a scholarly paper.

ENGL 510, Literature and the Bible, 3 Units

Students in this course develop critical strategies for using the Bible as a tool for literary study, learning various ways the Bible has been read as literature, as well as the special challenges of reading the Bible as a sacred text. They gain expertise in bringing the Bible into conversation with secular literature and culture in ways that open rather than shut down dialogue. They also examine biblical imagery, symbols, archetypes, and other storytelling devices in literary and other texts, making applications to genres pertinent to their concentration - for example, poetry and the Bible, parables in film and literature, or critical analysis of biblical archetypes in the work of a particular author or group of authors.

ENGL 520, Literature and Theology, 3 Units

Students in this course read, discuss, and critically analyze literary texts that deal directly or implicitly with religious themes. The main goal is to integrate the study of literary texts with insights gleaned from Christian theology and the Bible; to that end, students familiarize themselves with one or several theological themes within the Christian tradition and develop this theme (or cluster of themes) through analysis of one or several literary texts. The culminating project is a publishable (or conference-worthy) critical paper that examines one or several literary texts from a theologically informed Christian perspective. Theological themes vary according to the interests of students and faculty; previous topics included secularism and the sacred, the problem of evil, materialism vs. supernaturalism, sacramental imagination, social justice, poverty, the sacred land, Christ figures, prodigal sons and daughters, and illness, suffering, and death.

ENGL 530, British Literature Seminar, 3 Units

This course studies various special topics in British literature and culture, including but not limited to authors, genres, movements, periods, and methodologies in British literary studies. Students will study a range of authors and texts as well as relevant secondary sources.

ENGL 540, American Literature Seminar, 3 Units

This course studies various special topics in American literature and culture, including but not limited to authors, genres, movements, periods, and methodologies in American literary studies. Students will study a range of authors and texts as well as relevant secondary sources.

ENGL 550, World Literature Seminar, 3 Units

This course studies various special topics in world literature and culture, including but not limited to authors, genres, movements, periods, and methodologies in comparative literature and literary studies. Students will study a range of authors and texts as well as relevant secondary sources.

ENGL 560, Creative Writing Seminar, 3 Units

The creative writing workshop will enable students to create original texts in a creative genre (poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, playwriting, screenwriting, or hybrid genres) by studying existing texts in that genre, exploring writing craft, and working through revision techniques.

ENGL 568, Writing for Religious Audiences, 3 Units

Millions of readers across the world enjoy works written specifically for a Christian audience. The daily devotional magazine The Upper Room, for example, has a worldwide readership of 2 million. Charles Stanley's In Touch magazine has a readership of 1 million for the print and online versions of the publication. Students in this course will learn to write for this large Christian audience and how to market their work to editors and agents. They will focus on the types of articles that are particularly open to freelance writers, such as book reviews, personal experience articles, and personal profiles. They will also learn and practice the process of writing a book proposal and sample chapters for a non-fiction book targeted to the Christian market. Students will participate in an off-campus professional writers conference where they will pitch their article or book ideas to editors and agents.

ENGL 570, Graduate Research Methods in English, 3 Units

The goal of this class is to help students make the intellectual and emotional transition from undergraduate to graduate work, empower students with the key skills they will need during their graduate work, and prepare them for work and/or further study beyond the MA. The course will introduce students to graduate level standards for doing and presenting research in English and its related disciplines. It will enlarge and deepen students' repertoire of skills in effectively using available research tools, including library databases, WorldCat, Link+, etc. Students will build on the skills acquired as undergraduates in finding, critically evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing primary and secondary sources in order to make a contribution to the existing scholarly discourse. Students will learn to recognize how and where their individual interests and worldview intersect with, challenge, and speak to the larger academic community. Students will also learn to formulate, deepen, and pursue graduate level questions of scholarly interest over a sustained period of time. This class will prepare students for their other graduate level classes in the MA program and equip students to function as independent scholars outside the umbrella of a professor's guidance. Students who intend to pursue doctoral work, the legal field, or other careers involving research are strongly encouraged to take this class. Students who have been away from study for more than a year are also strongly encouraged to take this class.

ENGL 580, Critical Theory Seminar, 3 Units

This course introduces students to critical theory in the context of a specific theme, theoretical movement, or literary topic. Students will examine and practice models of critique and cultural analysis, considering how literature and language develops in particular social and material conditions. Topics will cover both major theoretical movements in critical theory, such as post-structuralism, reader-response, queer theory, hermeneutics, and post-colonial studies, as well as emerging theoretical approaches, such as affect studies, critical race studies, eco-criticism, historical phenomenology, new formalism, and transnational studies. Course assignments are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills required to do interdisciplinary work in literary studies.

ENGL 590, Writing Center Pedagogy and Practice, 3 Units

In this course, students will explore the pedagogical theory behind writing centers and, at a basic level, composition courses. Students will also learn to apply the theory in their own interactions with students, potentially in Azusa Pacific University's Writing Center while enrolled in the Master's program, and/or in their future careers. In addition, students will come to better understand the complexities of writing processes, what successful writing processes look like, process and post-process theory, and how to improve their own processes.

ENGL 591, Literature Pedagogy for Adult Audiences, 3 Units

In this course, students will deepen their work of developing the literary mind as they apply their knowledge of literature to processes of planning, implementing, assessing, and reflecting on lessons, materials (including media), and curricula for adolescent and adult learners. To accomplish these competencies, students will read, discuss, and critically analyze texts and media that deal directly or implicitly with the study of literature, learning theory (e.g., envisionment, transactional theory of the literary work, formalism), and the Common Core State Standards. They will practice research-based teaching pedagogy that addresses the needs of diverse learners (e.g., generational, cultural, linguistic, learning styles, learning needs) at the secondary or college level. Observation of, and interviews with, expert teachers, coupled with curricular (lesson and syllabus) planning, teaching, research, discussion, application, and assessment will provide students with a practical foundation for teaching from a theologically-informed Christian perspective.

ENGL 592, Introduction to Composition Studies, 3 Units

This course provides an introduction to the rich, diverse field that is Composition studies today. The focus in the course is on learning about pedagogy that encourages effective writing, though some reading in theory is recommended to deepen awareness of how unexamined theory can lead to ineffective classroom practices. Topics of focus will include teaching process, understanding discourse models, using assessment for effective learning, studying composition historiographies, understanding how social, expressivist, and cognitive approaches to writing and language are important to pedagogies, understanding post-process theories of rhetoric, and learning new and various ways to assess writing.

ENGL 598, Thesis/Portfolio, 3 Units

Students in this seminar will write a forty to sixty page thesis that examines a well-focused question or problem through an informed context that is critical, theoretical, and/or historical. Students focusing on creative or professional writing may choose to develop a portfolio consisting of various original works of fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, or material formatted for presentation on the stage or screen. To this portfolio of original creative efforts students will append a brief (five to ten page) commentary or critical paper discussing the aesthetic, philosophical, psychological, and/or theological dimensions of their work.

Prerequisite: Sixty percent of MA coursework completed

ENGL 599, Independent Study, 1-3 Units

In this course students pursue a program of individual study with a supervising faculty member on a subject or interest not covered in regular course offerings, which is developed in consultation with the faculty member and approved by the department chair.

FREN 101, Elementary French I, 3 Units

This is the first in a two-course sequence emphasizing practical French communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the French-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

FREN 102, Elementary French II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical French communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the French-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: FREN 101, or appropriate score on language placement test.

FREN 201, Intermediate French I, 3 Units

This two-course sequence is a continuation of FREN 101/ FREN 102, and consists of a thorough review of grammar, expansion of students' vocabulary, conversation practice, and a variety of guided writing experiences. Related cultural media and literary excerpts are integrated into the course.

Prerequisite: FREN 101, FREN 102, or an appropriate French CLEP Exam score, or department consent

FREN 202, Intermediate French II, 3 Units

This course is a continuation of FREN 201.

Prerequisite: FREN 201, or an appropriate French CLEP Exam score, or department consent

FREN 301, Advanced French Conversation, 3 Units

This courses optimizes students' conversation ability, reinforcing grammatical structures and emphasizing communication skills and stylistics.

Prerequisite: FREN 202

FREN 311, The French-speaking World, 3 Units

This course surveys the histories and cultures of the various French-speaking societies of the world, with primary emphasis upon 20th-century France. The class is conducted in French.

Prerequisite: FREN 202

FREN 320, Advanced French Composition, 3 Units

In this writing course, students learn composition techniques and creative writing in the French language. Various writing styles are covered.

Prerequisite: FREN 202

FREN 495, Special Topics in French, 3 Units

This course allows offerings of diverse topics in French studies that are not covered by other required department courses. Special interests of faculty and students may be targeted under this category. Literature, art, historical events, and cultural movements are examples of special topics. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: FREN 202

GERM 101, Elementary German I, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical German communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the German-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

GERM 102, Elementary German II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical German communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the German-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: GERM 101, or appropriate score on language placement exam.

GERM 201, Intermediate German I, 3 Units

This two-course sequence is a continuation of GERM 101/ GERM 102, and consists of a thorough review of grammar, expansion of students' vocabulary, conversation practice, and a variety of guided writing experiences. Related cultural media and literary excerpts are integrated into the course.

Prerequisite: GERM 101, GERM 102, an appropriate German CLEP Exam score, or department consent

GERM 202, Intermediate German II, 3 Units

This course is a continuation of GERM 201.

Prerequisite: GERM 201, or an appropriate German CLEP Exam score, or department consent

JAPA 101, Elementary Japanese I, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Japanese communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces the cultural world of Japan. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

JAPA 102, Elementary Japanese II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Japanese communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces the cultural world of Japan. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: JAPA 101, or appropriate score on language placement exam.

MODL 101, Modern Language I, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical communication skills for beginners in a language that is not normally offered by the department. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces cultural aspects. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

MODL 102, Modern Language II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical communication skills for beginners in a language that is not normally offered by the department. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces cultural aspects. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: MODL 101 of the same language, or appropriate score on language placement exam.

MODL 250, Self-Directed Language Study, 1-3 Units

This is the first semester of a self-directed language study course which requires dedicated individual effort on the part of the students, because the course progresses at an accelerated pace. Students meet with the professor prior to signing up for the course in order to determine goals, method of study, required personal discipline, responsibilities, and schedule of periodic meetings with the professor. Thus, prior acceptance by the professor is required.

Prerequisite: Completed general studies language requirement and Junior/Senior standing or instructor consent

MODL 251, Self-Directed Language Study II, 1-3 Units

This is the second semester of a self-directed language study course which requires dedicated individual effort on the part of the students as the course progresses at an accelerated pace. Students meet with the professor prior to signing up for the course in order to determine goals, method of study, required personal discipline, responsibilities, and schedule of periodic meetings with the professor. Thus, prior acceptance by the professor is required.

Prerequisite: MODL 250 (in the same language), and junior/senior standing or instructor consent

MODL 495, Special Topics in Modern Languages, 3 Units

This course presents topics not covered by regular department courses. Course may be repeated as topics change for up to 6 units toward graduation.

SPAN 101, Elementary Spanish I, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Spanish communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

SPAN 102, Elementary Spanish II, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Spanish communication for beginners. It is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and introduces different cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Classes meet three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 101, or appropriate score on language placement exam.

SPAN 103, Elementary Spanish I for Healthcare Professionals, 3 Units

This is the first of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Spanish communication for beginners, helping students develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Course material emphasizes key vocabulary for the healthcare fields and practical communication skills that students can immediately use on the job, and also introduces different cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Classes meet for three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

SPAN 104, Elementary Spanish II for Healthcare Professionals, 3 Units

This is the second of a two-course sequence emphasizing practical Spanish communication for beginners, helping students develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Course material emphasizes key vocabulary for the healthcare fields and practical communication skills that students can immediately use on the job, and also introduces different cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Classes meet for three hours weekly, and utilize a lecture format. Meets the General Education Requirement: Foreign Language. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 103 or equivalent

SPAN 201, Intermediate Spanish I, 3 Units

This two-course sequence is a continuation of SPAN 101/ SPAN 102, and consists of a thorough review of grammar, expansion of students' vocabulary, conversation practice, and a variety of guided writing experiences. Related cultural media and literary excerpts are integrated into the course.

Prerequisite: SPAN 101, SPAN 102, or an appropriate Spanish CLEP Exam score, an appropriate Spanish Placement score, or department approval

SPAN 202, Intermediate Spanish II, 3 Units

This course is a continuation of SPAN 201.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, or an appropriate Spanish CLEP Exam score, an appropriate Spanish Placement score, or department approval

SPAN 250, Intermediate Conversation and Writing Abroad, 3 Units

This course provides intensive conversation with supportive written language practice in a select site abroad. Discussion of assigned social, cultural, or literary topics at an intermediate level is required. The course is arranged in tour-fashion during summer session.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201 and SPAN 202

SPAN 250H, Intermediate Conversation and Writing Abroad - Honors, 3 Units

This course provides intensive conversation with supportive written language practice in a select site abroad. Discussion of assigned social, cultural, or literary topics at an intermediate level is required. The course is arranged in tour-fashion during summer session.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201 and SPAN 202. Must also be a student admitted to the Honors College and be considered a member in "active" status.

SPAN 301, Spanish Conversation and Community, 3 Units

This course optimizes students' conversational abilities in Spanish, reinforcing grammatical structures and emphasizing communication skills, which are concurrently put in practice through service learning. Meets the General Education Requirement: Intercultural Competence. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 202

SPAN 301H, Advanced Spanish - Honors, 3 Units

This course is designed to optimize students' conversation ability, reinforcing grammatical structures and emphasizing communication skills and stylistics.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201 and SPAN 202. Must also be a student admitted to the Honors College and be considered a member in "active" status.

SPAN 305, Spanish for Heritage Speakers, 3 Units

This course is for native/heritage speakers of Spanish. It gives them opportunities to use their conversational skills in the community and to reinforce their reading and writing skills. It advances awareness and understanding of their cultural heritage.

Prerequisite: SPAN 202

SPAN 310, Advanced Language-Study Practicum, 3 Units

This course features individualized field study in a Spanish-speaking milieu under the combined direction of a faculty advisor and an on-field supervisor. It provides students with a one-term immersion into Spanish language and culture with opportunities for participating in special research and/or service projects, family home stays, and/or field seminars.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201 and SPAN 202

SPAN 310H, Advanced Language-Study Practicum - Honors, 4 Units

This course features individualized field study in a Spanish-speaking milieu under the combined direction of a faculty advisor and an on-field supervisor. It provides students with a one-term immersion into Spanish language and culture with opportunities for participating in special research and/or service projects, family home stays, and/or field seminars.

Prerequisite: To enroll in the course, must be a student admitted to the Honors Program and be considered a member in "active" status.

SPAN 311, Civilization of Spain, 3 Units

The course covers Spanish history from early development through the modern era. The country's art, literature, religion, and architecture are discussed simultaneously with related historical events. Class is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 312, Latin American Civilization, 3 Units

This course surveys the history and aspects of the literature, art, and institutions of Latin America from pre-Columbian time to the modern age. Class is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 315, Politics and Society in Latin America, 3 Units

This course studies political and social themes from across contemporary Latin America, equipping students to become active global citizens. Specific topics of this course vary. Meets the General Education Requirement: Civic Knowledge and Engagement. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 202

SPAN 330, History and Civilization of the Spanish-speaking World, 4 Units

This course introduces students to the history and civilization of Spain and Latin America. Class is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: WRIT 204. Recommended: SPAN 301

SPAN 350, Public Speaking in Spanish, 3 Units

This course teaches oral communication in Spanish. Students will learn how to speak with professionalism in the language, as well as how to research, outline, and deliver speeches and presentations. Meets the General Education Requirement: Oral Communication. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 202

SPAN 421, Survey of Spanish Literature, 3 Units

The development of literature from El Cid and the recently discovered jarchas through the 20th century is reviewed. This is a survey course which acquaints students with the major periods of Spanish literature and the outstanding writers of Spain. The class is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 422, Survey of Latin American Literature, 3 Units

This course begins with pre-Columbian literature in Latin America and continues through the present day. It is intended as a survey of prominent authors and their works. The class is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 431, Spanish Language Poetry and Short Story, 3 Units

An introduction to exemplary poetry and short stories of Spanish and/or Spanish American authors is provided. Several works are explored in-depth during the course. Actual title may vary from term to term.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 432, Literary Masters, 4 Units

This course provides students with a detailed understanding of select outstanding Spanish and Latin American literary works and the great authors who wrote them. Meets the General Education Requirement: Humanities: Literature. 

Prerequisite: WRIT 204 or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended

SPAN 440, Spanish Applied Linguistics, 3 Units

A study of the basic components of language (sounds, word structures, grammatical patterns, and meaning constructions), error analysis, and contrastive analysis in Spanish is offered. The course includes a review of Spanish dialectical differences, their origins, and social implications.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 450, Spanish Language Pedagogy, 3 Units

Analysis and discussion of second-language acquisition theory, and the various instructional strategies, technologies, materials, and assessment techniques in Spanish teaching and learning are covered.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202, and WRIT 204, or department consent. SPAN 301 recommended.

SPAN 460, Writing 3: Survey of the Literature of the Spanish-speaking World, 4 Units

This course offers an overview of the progressive evolution of the Hispanic literary tradition, introducing the major authors and movements up to the twentieth century. It builds on the skills developed in Writing 1 and Writing 2, teaching students how to write professional-quality scholarly articles in the field of Hispanic literary history. Class is conducted in Spanish. Meets the General Education Requirement: Writing 3: Writing in the Disciplines. 

Prerequisite: WRIT 204; SPAN 330 and SPAN 432 are recommended

SPAN 480, Spanish Capstone Seminar, 3 Units

This course provides the opportunity for students to reflect upon, reinterpret and organize the linguistic, cultural, and literary information they have pursued throughout previous semesters. In concert with the professor, a complete overview of students' language experience within the program helps define the direction of their individualized study for the semester. Such study culminates in a personally designed Capstone Seminar project. Meets the General Education Requirement: Integrative and Applied Learning. 

Prerequisite: Spanish majors only; Senior standing

SPAN 494, Internship, 3 Units

For students planning to teach Spanish, this course provides an opportunity for directed experiences in applying foreign language skills to specific tasks. The tasks are arranged individually and supervised directly by the instructor. Tasks are geared to the individual goals of the student. Enrollment is contingent upon department approval and requires the independent study petition process through One Stop I Undergraduate Enrollment Services Center.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201 and SPAN 202

SPAN 495, Special Topics in Spanish, 3 Units

This course allows offerings of diverse topics in Hispanic studies that are not covered by other required department courses. Special interests of faculty and students may be targeted under this category. Culture, politics, and translation are examples of special topics. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: SPAN 421 or SPAN 422

SPAN 497, Readings, 1-4 Units

This is a program of study concentrating on assigned readings, discussions, and writing arranged between and designed by a student of upper-division standing and a full-time professor. An independent study fee is assessed for each enrollment in this class.

Faculty

Department Chair

Windy Petrie, Ph.D.

Director of Graduate Studies

Emily Griesinger, Ph.D.

Professors

Thomas Allbaugh, Ph.D.

Joseph Bentz, Ph.D.

Patricia Brown, Ph.D.

Mark Eaton, Ph.D.

Emily Griesinger, Ph.D.

Andrea Ivanov-Craig, Ph.D.

Carole Lambert, Ph.D.

Christopher Noble, Ph.D.

Windy Petrie, Ph.D.

Associate Professors

Sarah Adams, Ph.D.

Michael Clark, Ph.D.

James Fujitani, Ph.D.

Marcela Rojas, Ph.D.

Matthew Smith, Ph.D.

Aroldo Solórzano, Ph.D.

Caleb Spencer, Ph.D.

Derek Updegraff, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Kristen Sipper-Denlinger, Ph.D.

Faculty Emeriti

Nancy Brashear, Ph.D.

Eric Drewry, JD, Ph.D.

David Esselstrom, Ph.D.

June Hamlow, M.A.

Maximo Rossi, Ph.D.

Adjunct Faculty

Gail Bouslough, Ph.D.

Jonathan Catalan, M.A.

Chiung-Li Chang, M.A.

Edgar Escoto, M.A.

Elizabeth Hauff, M.A.

Paulina Martinez, M.A.

Yumi Parks, M.A.

Michael Pereira, M.A.

William Ripley, M.A.

Douglas Smith, M.A.